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Posted: 12/10/2003 5:19:18 PM EDT
I'm contemplating go back to school for an engineering degree. My question to you guys is, do you work in a lab or do you sit in a cube all day? I'm thinking of going back for chemical or mechanical engineering degree (I have business degree already). However, the catch is, I don't want to sit in a cube all day in front of a computer, I want to work in a lab, work hands on with things. Which degree will help me work in a lab and not sit in a cube?

Secondly, which degree will (or should) make myself more marketable in the workforce?

My third question is, will the business degree help at all with getting a job and/or at the job itself once I complete my degree? I’d hate to see it go to waste, but you gotta do what you gotta do.

Thanks for all you input.
Link Posted: 12/10/2003 5:43:57 PM EDT
For petrochem, Mechanical can get you into the fab yard or off shore. But most engineering jobs are sitting in cubes If you want to actually work in a lab, a PHd is usually required in chem-e. Sorry.
Link Posted: 12/10/2003 5:44:23 PM EDT
[b]xbigfootx[/b]: I'm a Civil Engineer, and I finished my degree pretty late in life, and after nearly 20 years in construction and engineering. Go for it, man. With regard to working in a lab, one of the really rapidly expanding fields is Environmental Science. At most engineering schools, this is part of the Civil Engineering program, but is closely tied to ChemE. There is a real demand for hard-working EnviroEs right now, and will continue to be so, since the field consists largely of moving targets. I think you will be very pleasantly surprised to find a generally right-leaning philosophy among Enviro types, since many of the researchers are very familiar with the truth about the environment and see the current state of the regulations a real travesty. Lots of hunters, too! If you're really interested in lab work, be prepared for an advanced degree. A Master's degree will be the absolute minimum for most research assignments, and a PhD is getting to be a more common requirement. Of course, by the time you finish an advanced degree, you'll be completely fed up with lab work, and ready for a job sitting in a cubicle all day! Good luck, and keep us posted on your decision.
Link Posted: 12/10/2003 5:56:55 PM EDT
Mech E all the way. Most marketable and stable of the engineering degrees. In aerospace, you can work on hardware until you become management, then you are stuck in meeting hell and your office for the rest of your life. Been in the biz for 24 years, watch some of my stuff land on Mars Jan 3. CW
Link Posted: 12/10/2003 6:01:42 PM EDT
You can choose to do research during undergrad for ChemEng (instead of higher level classes), once you get out its all a question of who your employer is and where they want you (labs, cubes or on the road). Otherwise, you'll have about one lab class a year. Kharn Chem Eng, UDel class of '04 (hopefully [;)] )
Link Posted: 12/10/2003 6:04:01 PM EDT
Go for a degree in metalurgical engineering or some kind of materials engineering. Generally lots of lab time with that field.
Link Posted: 12/10/2003 6:24:10 PM EDT
Link Posted: 12/10/2003 6:27:24 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 12/10/2003 6:28:37 PM EDT by Winston_Wolf]
... (1) Manufacturing and Quality engineering will keep you "on the floor probably more than you'd desire after several years, however any company worth their salt will start you out getting your hands dirty in an apprentice postition. ... (2) A degree in mechanical engineering and a well-rounded knowledge of the strength of material (stress) will open a lot of doors for you in the field. Especially in the defense industry. ... (3) A business degree is very valuable, after all, every organization watches the bottom line closely if they expect new business or more research funds. You'll need to present a thorough business case analysis for every proposal or design you're trying to get shareholders or investors to buy into. No ones ideas are adopted, developed and deployed without all conceivable risks minimized. ... For me, nearly half of my average day is in the composites, machining or tooling shop, laboratory or climbing on an aircraft. ... This year, I was on a stint with a prime supplier bringing them up to speed with a newly designed system for a military aircraft. I had to get them AS9100 ready with new advanced composite materials, tooling, processes and specifications as well. Not only engineering involved but also it required diplomacy, liaison with the USG, Army DCMA regional representatives and Redstone Arsenal. That was very interesting and rewarding (in more ways than one) and except for getting homesick in Manhattan I feel I am cutout for that kind of work. ... Sure, I spend time in my "cubicle" but when I am, I'm usually deeply involved with a complex para-solids CAD/CAM/CAE system in the thick of a complex design, between that and formal presentations, data reduction and analysis and surfing ARFCOM my day is full and quite involved. ... If aerospace is your ultimate goal, another nice benefit is December slowdown I usually take the entire month off. Like I'm inching into now, woo hoo. ... Good luck, it's a challenging yet rewarding field.
Link Posted: 12/10/2003 6:27:36 PM EDT
I'm a ChemE (16 yrs). It's very difficult to stay out of a cube with any engineering degree. I did work in a Pulp Mill for few years. It was great hands on work. But guess what. the Mill closed. They don't build hands-on plants or facilities in the US anymore. Too much regulations and labor is too high and environmentalists don't like it. They want everyone to sell insurance or Lattes or something. Your business degree will just make it worse. Odds are against cube escape as an engineer.
Link Posted: 12/10/2003 6:31:02 PM EDT
Originally Posted By xbigfootx: I'm contemplating go back to school for an engineering degree. My question to you guys is, do you work in a lab or do you sit in a cube all day? I'm thinking of going back for chemical or mechanical engineering degree (I have business degree already). However, the catch is, I don't want to sit in a cube all day in front of a computer, I want to work in a lab, work hands on with things. Which degree will help me work in a lab and not sit in a cube?
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First: What industry do you want to work in? What do you want to do in a lab? Design validation, reliability, research, prototype, etc.?
Secondly, which degree will (or should) make myself more marketable in the workforce?
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Again, this depends on what you want to do. I have been a QE, QM, SQE, and I have a Master in Quality. I can get most QC jobs I apply for. What do you want to do?
My third question is, will the business degree help at all with getting a job and/or at the job itself once I complete my degree? I’d hate to see it go to waste, but you gotta do what you gotta do. Thanks for all you input.
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It is part of your tool kit. It is never a waste. My undergrad is in Criminology and Aviation Maintenance. The statistical analysis of crime fit well with QC. The aviation maintenance background gives me great insight into trouble shooting complex mechanisms.
Link Posted: 12/10/2003 6:42:49 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 12/10/2003 6:59:57 PM EDT by Cold_Warrior]
Originally Posted By Troy:
Originally Posted By Cold_Warrior: Been in the biz for 24 years, watch some of my stuff land on Mars Jan 3. CW
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Even though I'm not a raving space-brain like a few people I know, that's still cool as hell! [beer] -Troy
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Thanks, but I'll take a bow after we know we haven't created another crater. CW
Link Posted: 12/10/2003 6:51:28 PM EDT
Want something different? Swing by Michigan State University and check out the School of Packaging.
Link Posted: 12/10/2003 7:33:53 PM EDT
You might look into mine engineering. Don't laugh, look at where the price of metals is going. The past ten years has been hard on the mining industry, but it has definitely picked up in the past year or two. Mining companies went through some serious belt tightening and now they need to start hiring again with the increased profits they're realizing. Many universities no longer teach mine engineering (a civ eng degree with some geology would work) and nobody seems to want to get a degree in a mining related field (I'm a production geologist). Since there's not too many people with the technical skills in the market and demand is high, you'll find it very easy to get a good paying job. There will always be some demand for jobs in this field, but the way the market is going it could be good for many years to come.
Link Posted: 12/10/2003 7:39:53 PM EDT
I just want something where I can build something. I also want to same decent money. I worked inspection and I am working tech support now, inspection was ok, I hate techsupport Im 21 already getting my chest hurting from dealing with morons.
Link Posted: 12/10/2003 9:09:07 PM EDT
Have you considered electrical engineering? Plenty of opportunities for lab time there...prototyping and testing circuits, characterizing devices, testing for EMI compliance, etc. It's not uncommon to divide your time roughly equally between office work (selecting the right devices and designing them in to the circuit) and lab work (building and debugging the product). Often, the lab work is shared with one or more technicians or engineers, so it's not like there's never any interaction with coworkers – plus the coffee breaks and office bull sessions, natch...
Link Posted: 12/11/2003 3:46:49 AM EDT
As a mining engineer, you will be VERY hands on. You are in school for a supervisory slot, and it is a make-it-or-break-it kind of feild. I am an extractive metallurgist (Don't do it, very narrow clannish job feild), and our General Manager does it all. Mine planning, contract writing, running heavy equipment, tree feller, septic tank shoveller. [:)] He had to take the lead on shovelling the septic tank after the labourers threatened to quit before they did that sort of work. Lo and behold, it was not as bad as anticipated, and it is not a dreaded job by anyone anymore. As an enviromnental engineer, you will be playing a political game in the office with regulators, argueing things with no basis in common sense. The most thankless job in the world.
Link Posted: 12/11/2003 4:00:26 AM EDT
I'm contemplating go back to school for an engineering degree. My question to you guys is, do you work in a lab or do you sit in a cube all day? I'm thinking of going back for chemical or mechanical engineering degree (I have business degree already). However, the catch is, I don't want to sit in a cube all day in front of a computer, I want to work in a lab, work hands on with things. Which degree will help me work in a lab and not sit in a cube?
View Quote
It would really depend on what YOUR goals are and in what industry you intend to work. I am also pursuing an engineering degree (BSME) as an "older" student (no such thing anymore). Where I work, at an electric utility, the staff engineers (BSMEs, EEs, and some industrial) spend the majority of their time in the field or at a plant. They have a moderate amount of travel and work mostly independently. Some of the engineering consulting firms with whom we've worked employ engineers for research and design projects (as in cube work). A business degree would be beneficial if you intend to get into management (definitely not my gig). I know a lot of engineers who've gone back to school for business degrees just for that purpose.
Link Posted: 12/11/2003 4:12:13 AM EDT
Geotechnical Engineering (a branch of civil engineering) is generally a hands on field. At least in the early years. Geotech work is usually required for any construction project (roads, buildings, railroad, utilities, mining) of any size. The use of a business degree in the engineering field will usually mean that you are doing less engineering and more business of engineering. If you have experience in a business area (marketing, human resources, accounting, etc.), there is use for this in the engineering fields.
Link Posted: 12/11/2003 4:48:59 AM EDT
Originally Posted By Winston_Wolf: ... (1) Manufacturing and Quality engineering will keep you "on the floor probably more than you'd desire after several years, however any company worth their salt will start you out getting your hands dirty in an apprentice postition. ... (2) A degree in mechanical engineering and a well-rounded knowledge of the strength of material (stress) will open a lot of doors for you in the field. Especially in the defense industry. ... (3) A business degree is very valuable, after all, every organization watches the bottom line closely if they expect new business or more research funds. You'll need to present a thorough business case analysis for every proposal or design you're trying to get shareholders or investors to buy into. No ones ideas are adopted, developed and deployed without all conceivable risks minimized. ... For me, nearly half of my average day is in the composites, machining or tooling shop, laboratory or climbing on an aircraft. ... This year, I was on a stint with a prime supplier bringing them up to speed with a newly designed system for a military aircraft. I had to get them AS9100 ready with new advanced composite materials, tooling, processes and specifications as well. Not only engineering involved but also it required diplomacy, liaison with the USG, Army DCMA regional representatives and Redstone Arsenal. That was very interesting and rewarding (in more ways than one) and except for getting homesick in Manhattan I feel I am cutout for that kind of work. ... Sure, I spend time in my "cubicle" but when I am, I'm usually deeply involved with a complex para-solids CAD/CAM/CAE system in the thick of a complex design, between that and formal presentations, data reduction and analysis and surfing ARFCOM my day is full and quite involved. ... If aerospace is your ultimate goal, another nice benefit is December slowdown I usually take the entire month off. Like I'm inching into now, woo hoo. ... Good luck, it's a challenging yet rewarding field.
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Winston... what's your email address? I'm sending my resume... [:D]
Link Posted: 12/11/2003 5:34:32 AM EDT
Link Posted: 12/11/2003 5:43:50 AM EDT
Originally Posted By fight4yourrights: Want something different? Swing by Michigan State University and check out the School of Packaging.
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Not a bad idea. That type of degree actually crossed my mind a while back. I'm at MSU working on a ME degree (soph) with hopefully either a manufacturing or biomedical option by the time i'm done. Any questions about MSU, let me know, I'll do my best to answer them.
Link Posted: 12/11/2003 5:48:58 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 12/11/2003 5:49:51 AM EDT by StariVojnik]
Im sorry to burst your bubble, but most companies are hiring engineers from India and China for diddly squat. My uncle worked for Fairchild, Grumman and I think Patent. He worked for nearly 20 years at the last engineering stint and was hacked, and replaced by a 24 year old Chinese immigrant. I suggest you go into the Health industry. They are always hiring and need people....Physical Therapists, OTR, Nurses...these are good jobs and you wont have to worry about finding a work or being laidoff .
Link Posted: 12/11/2003 6:00:53 AM EDT
Im sorry to burst your bubble, but most companies are hiring engineers from India and China for diddly squat. My uncle worked for Fairchild, Grumman and I think Patent. He worked for nearly 20 years at the last engineering stint and was hacked, and replaced by a 24 year old Chinese immigrant. I suggest you go into the Health industry. They are always hiring and need people....Physical Therapists, OTR, Nurses...these are good jobs and you wont have to worry about finding a work or being laidoff
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That's about the most bullshit quote I've seen yet this morning.
Link Posted: 12/11/2003 6:12:47 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 12/11/2003 6:15:51 AM EDT by StariVojnik]
Oh, Mr. Hootersville...Like im gonna take your remark seriously...come to NY and try and land a great paying job as an engineer and you'll find yourself collecting unemployment for a long time. Troll!
Link Posted: 12/11/2003 6:22:36 AM EDT
Originally Posted By StariVojnik: Oh, Mr. Hootersville...Like im gonna take your remark seriously...come to NY and try and land a great paying job as an engineer and you'll find yourself collecting unemployment for a long time. Troll!
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You need to come to Michigan, I have recruiters calling everyday.
Link Posted: 12/11/2003 6:23:19 AM EDT
Oh, Mr. Hootersville...Like im gonna take your remark seriously...come to NY and try and land a great paying job as an engineer and you'll find yourself collecting unemployment for a long time. Troll!
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Troll? Well, that took a lot of thought, didn't it? If you had ANY idea about this subject (obviously you don't), you'd know medical professionals have experienced downsizing and layoffs just like every other industry (the wife has been an RN for almost 15 years). You'd also know thast there has been a constant demand for engineering disciplines such as electrical, mechanical, industrial, aerospace, civil/environmental, and chemical. Now maybe you're getting your employment figures from "The Daily Worker," but they sure as hell don't reflect reality.
Link Posted: 12/11/2003 7:04:19 AM EDT
Originally Posted By Cold_Warrior:
Originally Posted By Troy:
Originally Posted By Cold_Warrior: Been in the biz for 24 years, watch some of my stuff land on Mars Jan 3. CW
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Even though I'm not a raving space-brain like a few people I know, that's still cool as hell! [beer] -Troy
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Thanks, but I'll take a bow after we know we haven't created another crater. CW
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This is way too cool!...Thanks Warrior and you to Campybob. You guys give us inspiration.
Link Posted: 12/11/2003 7:38:36 AM EDT
Originally Posted By StariVojnik: Im sorry to burst your bubble, but most companies are hiring engineers from India and China for diddly squat. My uncle worked for Fairchild, Grumman and I think Patent. He worked for nearly 20 years at the last engineering stint and was hacked, and replaced by a 24 year old Chinese immigrant. I suggest you go into the Health industry. They are always hiring and need people....Physical Therapists, OTR, Nurses...these are good jobs and you wont have to worry about finding a work or being laidoff .
View Quote
The first sentence in this post is wholly inaccurate at best, and an outright untruth on the bias. With the possible exception of software development, there has been no substantiated evidence of any type of wholesale transfer of day-to-day design engineering from US companies overseas. The liability issues alone generally preclude this type of shenanigans in a typical consuulting engineering practice, and QA/QC issues would keep most manufacturers from outsourcing any meaningful quantity of work. I keep hearing this load of horseshit, and what it always comes down to are light manufacturing and technical assembly jobs that are being contracted overseas, in addition to the ubiquitous use of Mr. Patel for customer disservice. That said, I did receive an unsolicited resume by email from a designer in Indonesia. He attached samples of his work, and a blanket proposal to do design work, for projects that my company does, for a lump sum fee of US$250 per drawing. Right now, with my crew, I'm sending out drawings at a cost of between $1600 and $2400 a sheet, depending on the project. Sure, the $250/sheet price looks good on the outset, but by the time I "manage" the overseas contractor, I'll have as much in it as I do now, plus I don't have any control over the security of the intellectual property contained in the drawings. Now, on [b]StariVojnik[/b]'s point about the health care industry, I think he is dead on the money there. However, the original poster has recognized engineering as his chosen field (for now). Sorry for the hijack, but the dissemination of the false rumor that pick-and-shovel engineering is being farmed out overseas should not go unchecked.
Link Posted: 12/11/2003 7:47:38 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 12/11/2003 7:51:35 AM EDT by StariVojnik]
Im just stating what happened to my uncle. He is a good engineer, many of the scafolding that you see on building sites were designed by him and his staff at Patent. But the company has been suffering and he was laid off almost a year now. He had found out that Patent had hired younger engineers to do the same work (Chinese imports) for less money. Maybe the engineering hiring situation is more regional and the NY area is in a slump. Its good to know that recruiters are calling you, but are they paying a decent salary or are the low-balling? BTW, I think my uncle has a good age-discrimination case. also, here is a good idea in keeping with his original intentions of becoming an engineer....you can design equipment for the health care industy. Im know there's mega bucks in that field. Just an idea. :)
Link Posted: 12/11/2003 7:56:38 AM EDT
Now, on StariVojnik's point about the health care industry, I think he is dead on the money there.
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That's not even correct either. There have been hospital and unit closings and cutbacks all over the country from time to time and even now. His whole statement is one of someone with limited perception and knowledge of either area of employment. Thankfully bullshit isn't a crime.
Link Posted: 12/11/2003 8:06:46 AM EDT
Jim I don't know what planet your on, but Health Care has been growing since I can remember. I look at the help wanted ads and all you see is RN's wanted, OTR's wanted, PTR's wanted, techical personel for machines like in the Nuclear Medicine departments of major hospitals...There people are in demand. They are expanding Bellvue Hospital, they just added a whole new building. Beth Israel had bought the old Stuyvesant High School recently and expanded its health service in that building. Thats just a couple. If you go to NJ, you will see many out-patient care places being erected all over. We have a growing elderly population in this country and they will need health services.
Link Posted: 12/11/2003 8:09:22 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 12/11/2003 8:13:58 AM EDT by Jim_Dandy]
Jim I don't know what planet your on, but Health Care has been growing since I can remember.
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I'm on Planet Reality where we don't suffer from short-term memory loss, Jack. You, my man, have adequately earned the TROLL moniker for the WEEK. Yeah, I must've just imagined this. [url]http://www.channeloklahoma.com/health/2690146/detail.html[/url] Tell me, does your mommy and daddy know you have access to the internet? Go here, this is more your style: [url]http://www.pbskids.org[/url] Get an adult to help you navigate.
Link Posted: 12/11/2003 8:22:54 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 12/11/2003 8:25:48 AM EDT by StariVojnik]
You know what Jim, im not gonna respond to you...you haven't added anything positive to this thread. All your doing is being a Bully and you seem to have a limited vocab. But then again what should I expect from someone whos handle is taken from a "Friendly's" ice cream dessert. Eat your Jim_Dandy and be a good boy and try to be quiet if you can't add something positive. And if anyone has earned it, it is you! Go smoke your crank.
Link Posted: 12/11/2003 8:26:32 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 12/11/2003 8:27:50 AM EDT by ghengiskhabb]
Mech Eng. Been in the Biz 9 years, 7 in Automotive. It is cool to see people driving trucks with my stuff all the time. Have been doing misc. engineering and have been far removed from hardware for last 2 years. Currently trying like hell to get back into the hardware side. Business will not help you much, and if it does, it will take you out of the lab. Materials has the best chance to get you into a lab. Marketability requres a sex change for major companies (assuming you are male). Graduating into a good economy helps. Degree selection depends on industry you are interested in. All require LOTS of math. Best thing to do is get a Monster.com account and do regular searches to see which kind of engineers are needed in locations and industries you are intested in.
Link Posted: 12/11/2003 9:04:53 AM EDT
Originally Posted By QCMGR: First: What industry do you want to work in? What do you want to do in a lab? Design validation, reliability, research, prototype, etc.?
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I like to build stuff and play with things, so I'm leaning toward an ME degree. Building or testing stuff would be nice.
My third question is, will the business degree help at all with getting a job and/or at the job itself once I complete my degree? I’d hate to see it go to waste, but you gotta do what you gotta do. It is part of your tool kit. It is never a waste. My undergrad is in Criminology and Aviation Maintenance. The statistical analysis of crime fit well with QC. The aviation maintenance background gives me great insight into trouble shooting complex mechanisms.
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Hey if you are the shoot we have at the end of december, I'll talk to you there. Thanks for your input.
Link Posted: 12/11/2003 9:08:14 AM EDT
Originally Posted By Winston_Wolf: ... For me, nearly half of my average day is in the composites, machining or tooling shop, laboratory or climbing on an aircraft. ... This year, I was on a stint with a prime supplier bringing them up to speed with a newly designed system for a military aircraft. I had to get them AS9100 ready with new advanced composite materials, tooling, processes and specifications as well. Not only engineering involved but also it required diplomacy, liaison with the USG, Army DCMA regional representatives and Redstone Arsenal. That was very interesting and rewarding (in more ways than one) and except for getting homesick in Manhattan I feel I am cutout for that kind of work. ... Sure, I spend time in my "cubicle" but when I am, I'm usually deeply involved with a complex para-solids CAD/CAM/CAE system in the thick of a complex design, between that and formal presentations, data reduction and analysis and surfing ARFCOM my day is full and quite involved. ... If aerospace is your ultimate goal, another nice benefit is December slowdown I usually take the entire month off. Like I'm inching into now, woo hoo. ... Good luck, it's a challenging yet rewarding field.
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If you don't mind me asking, what is your degree in and what level is it? If you don't want to post on the boards, feel free to email or IM me. Thanks.
Link Posted: 12/11/2003 9:12:01 AM EDT
Originally Posted By StariVojnik: Im just stating what happened to my uncle. He is a good engineer, many of the scafolding that you see on building sites were designed by him and his staff at Patent. But the company has been suffering and he was laid off almost a year now. He had found out that Patent had hired younger engineers to do the same work (Chinese imports) for less money.
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Evolve or die. BTW… what do you do for a living?
Maybe the engineering hiring situation is more regional and the NY area is in a slump.
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You have to go where the work is. (Apparently the Chinese guy understands that.)
Its good to know that recruiters are calling you, but are they paying a decent salary or are the low-balling?
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Top dollar. But then my expertise is Automotive Quality. Outside of Detroit the prospects drop off.
BTW, I think my uncle has a good age-discrimination case.
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Nice to know.
also, here is a good idea in keeping with his original intentions of becoming an engineer....you can design equipment for the health care industy. Im know there's mega bucks in that field.
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There is "Mega" bucks in any field if you have talent.
Just an idea. :)
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Ok
Link Posted: 12/11/2003 9:12:22 AM EDT
I have an Electrical Engineering degree. I sit in a cube all day. My title is Software engineer. But look on the bright side. Being in a cube all day allows me to look at ARFCOM all the time. [:)]
Link Posted: 12/11/2003 9:14:35 AM EDT
Originally Posted By xbigfootx:
Originally Posted By QCMGR: First: What industry do you want to work in? What do you want to do in a lab? Design validation, reliability, research, prototype, etc.?
View Quote
I like to build stuff and play with things, so I'm leaning toward an ME degree. Building or testing stuff would be nice.
My third question is, will the business degree help at all with getting a job and/or at the job itself once I complete my degree? I’d hate to see it go to waste, but you gotta do what you gotta do. It is part of your tool kit. It is never a waste. My undergrad is in Criminology and Aviation Maintenance. The statistical analysis of crime fit well with QC. The aviation maintenance background gives me great insight into trouble shooting complex mechanisms.
View Quote
Hey if you are the shoot we have at the end of december, I'll talk to you there. Thanks for your input.
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I will be there. What type of industry?
Link Posted: 12/11/2003 9:23:53 AM EDT
Originally Posted By QCMGR:
Originally Posted By StariVojnik: Im just stating what happened to my uncle. He is a good engineer, many of the scafolding that you see on building sites were designed by him and his staff at Patent. But the company has been suffering and he was laid off almost a year now. He had found out that Patent had hired younger engineers to do the same work (Chinese imports) for less money.
View Quote
Evolve or die. BTW… what do you do for a living?
Maybe the engineering hiring situation is more regional and the NY area is in a slump.
View Quote
You have to go where the work is. (Apparently the Chinese guy understands that.)
Its good to know that recruiters are calling you, but are they paying a decent salary or are the low-balling?
View Quote
Top dollar. But then my expertise is Automotive Quality. Outside of Detroit the prospects drop off.
BTW, I think my uncle has a good age-discrimination case.
View Quote
Nice to know.
also, here is a good idea in keeping with his original intentions of becoming an engineer....you can design equipment for the health care industy. Im know there's mega bucks in that field.
View Quote
There is "Mega" bucks in any field if you have talent.
Just an idea. :)
View Quote
Ok
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[b]Evolve or die. BTW… what do you do for a living?[/b] Building Manager/Engineer for commercial Hi-Rise buildings in NYC.
Link Posted: 12/11/2003 9:30:03 AM EDT
Originally Posted By StariVojnik: Building Manager/Engineer for commercial Hi-Rise buildings in NYC.
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Isn’t that the same thing as a building Superintendent or do you work for the “Super”?
Link Posted: 12/11/2003 9:43:10 AM EDT
Originally Posted By Cold_Warrior: Thanks, but I'll take a bow after we know we haven't created another crater.
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[lol] CW, do you know [url=http://www.marsguy.com/]Jeff Slostad[/url]? Late of that same program. Nothing causes problems like space exploration on a budget. [:|]
Link Posted: 12/11/2003 9:57:00 AM EDT
Originally Posted By QCMGR:
Originally Posted By StariVojnik: Building Manager/Engineer for commercial Hi-Rise buildings in NYC.
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Isn’t that the same thing as a building Superintendent or do you work for the “Super”?
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Not the same thing. I have super's, fire safety directors and cleaning staff that I manage in various buildings. I mostly deal with building owners and realty people. Im responsible for establishing Fire Safety Plans for the buildings and making sure the buildings are up to code. I also deal with all OC3/T1 line installations with Verizon, etc. I contract construction when floors need to be renovated....theres a lot of work....luckily its been slow and I can kick back a little. Its a great job. Very secure and especially when one has a good repoire with the building owners.
Link Posted: 12/11/2003 10:17:17 AM EDT
Building Manager/Engineer for commercial Hi-Rise buildings in NYC.
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I think the title of this thread is "Question for you engineers or those knowledgeable." You are neither, so quit wasting everyone's time.
Link Posted: 12/11/2003 10:25:07 AM EDT
TROLL. What up your brown eye today?
Link Posted: 12/11/2003 10:28:31 AM EDT
TROLL. What up your brown eye today?
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Don't you need to tend to a backed-up commode somewhere, or an old lady's furnace? You posted some fairly obvious bullshit and were taken to task since you don't know what in the hell you're posting. You dig? Just give everyone a break and go AWAY.
Link Posted: 12/11/2003 10:34:15 AM EDT
You obviously have issues...goodbye!
Link Posted: 12/11/2003 10:36:29 AM EDT
You obviously have issues...goodbye!
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Is this REALLY good-bye, or are you just wasting more time?
Link Posted: 12/11/2003 10:47:20 AM EDT
Originally Posted By StariVojnik: Oh, Mr. Hootersville...Like im gonna take your remark seriously...come to NY and try and land a great paying job as an engineer and you'll find yourself collecting unemployment for a long time.
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The problem isn't the degree, its the location. The Engineers in NY like things like UNIONS (Ugh what kind of professional even thinks about a union?). I workde for a while for Unisys - they moved part of the company to CT because we didn't have Engineer Unions or the other silly things NY has. Now come down to the DC area there is always a need for Engineers - Mechanical, Electrical, Computer.. [b]To answer the Original Question[/b] I'm a computer engineer with 15 years experience. I've worked in the lab (lots of fun - but there can be LONG hours), in cubicles, and in my own office. Its tough when you come out of school to 'pick' that you want to be in a lab (unless you go to a really prestigeous engineering school and graduate with excellent grades). Best bets for being in a lab environtment: Integration & Test Teams (especially for .Mil & .Gov projects). Every time I've been on an I&T team I've done heavy lab work (and there were always ME's EE's and CS/CEs). The other is getting a job in a University Lab doing research (what I am doing now). As for 'I want to build things' - Keep in mind as a Jr Engineer you will be at best designing or test small sub components. The 'BIG components'/Projects don't come till you have your advanced degrees, Professsional Engineering certification, and/or lots of experience. The only 'specialization' where you can be responsible for large components at a young age/experience level is Software Engineering. 3 Years out of college I was designing test software for Mars Observer and has some programmers working under my direction.
Link Posted: 12/11/2003 10:59:26 AM EDT
The problem isn't the degree, its the location.
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That's over [b]StariVojnik[/b]'s head, he won't get it. He tried to make a statement about the medical professions and wound up getting in too deep. It's the same with them, too. HMOs (among others) have bought out various clinics, hospitals, etc., and reorganized them. Either move with the job flow or do without. That's pretty simple for most people to understand, but then again, [b]StariVojnik[/b] seems to be something less than most people.
Link Posted: 12/11/2003 11:00:41 AM EDT
Originally Posted By Tweak: Nothing causes problems like space exploration on a budget. [:|]
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Don't I know it. I worked on Mars Observer I&T. It was [i]supposed[/i] to be an inexpensive family of exploration vessels, ended up costing mega $$. Lots of money cut from testing since we were using 'proven' components. Yeah proven in Earth's orbit - but not in interplanetary space. Seems the valve seals that work so well in protected earth orbit didn't hold up to the stronger radiation in interplanetary space. Oh well it was only $1 Billion.... Luckily my other projects fared better.
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