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Posted: 12/7/2003 1:35:09 AM EDT
How long does it take before you can stop walking around, looking at people, or listening to people before you stop thinking..... "you people have no fucking clue what's going on."

Will people always look at you like you're crazy when you say "I'd go back in a heart beat."?

And when does life go back to normal?

Thanks for the help and thank god for the VFW,
DG84

Link Posted: 12/7/2003 1:57:25 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 12/7/2003 2:00:05 AM EDT by osprey21]
Originally Posted By doorgunner84:
How long does it take before you can stop walking around, looking at people, or listening to people before you stop thinking..... "you people have no fucking clue what's going on."
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I still think that way. [b]Will people always look at you like you're crazy when you say "I'd go back in a heart beat."?[/b] I don't say it in public. [b]And when does life go back to normal?[/b] It took me about 6 years, but even after 33 years I still have the occasional nightmare. Ditto on the VFW.
Link Posted: 12/7/2003 2:06:11 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 12/7/2003 2:13:14 AM EDT by doorgunner84]
Thanks, just wondering.... I know there's people out there that have seen far worse shit then I. But I guess when you've seen a 3 y/o Afghanie kids grey matter you can't help but think about it after you drink a few beers. Guess the press is reporting that we hit 9 kids in a raid. Why doesn't the press report some of the good stuff we're doing there? my unit's been there since June and when I left in November we had 32 saves, one of those being an American, the rest being Afghanie civilians. Why the fuck doesn't he press pick up on that shit?
Link Posted: 12/7/2003 2:43:22 AM EDT
Oh, and when does the guilt of being home go away?
Link Posted: 12/7/2003 2:52:48 AM EDT
I understand were you're coming from DG but try and not let it get you down. Far more good things were done than bad and in your heart you know that's true. I saw some horrific things in my 2 tours but I've also seen some horrible things in everyday life today as well. You just have to keep moving forward my freind and not dwell on the negative aspects. [:)] As to the press, they are what they are and will continue to be so, so fuck them. Thanks for your service!
Link Posted: 12/7/2003 3:00:30 AM EDT
Unless my dad (Cam Rah Bay, '66-'67) is lying, combat is the [b]last[/b] place he'd want to be.
Link Posted: 12/7/2003 4:00:00 AM EDT
Take up skydiving. You will still walk around thinking:"you people have no fucking clue what's going on." ....but now you might just be thinking about skydiving. Our community is tight like yours and the LEO's. There's always risk and danger but its more under YOUR control. We like to live on the edge too.
Link Posted: 12/7/2003 4:10:37 AM EDT
Originally Posted By doorgunner84: How long does it take before you can stop walking around, looking at people, or listening to people before you stop thinking..... "you people have no fucking clue what's going on."
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BTW, some of those people you may be talking about may genuinely care about "what's going on," so be aware of this and don't write them all off. You just might be shutting out a few people who you can depend on later on in life. I've seen some vets who lived lonely lives b/c they decided that too many people weren't fit for their trust or friendship. Also, thank you for your service.
Link Posted: 12/7/2003 4:19:34 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 12/7/2003 4:20:53 AM EDT by echo6]
Originally Posted By doorgunner84: How long does it take before you can stop walking around, looking at people, or listening to people before you stop thinking..... "you people have no fucking clue what's going on." [blue]Never. Most people really DONT have a clue to whats really going on in the world. "But the man on the news said"....[/blue] Will people always look at you like you're crazy when you say "I'd go back in a heart beat."? [blue]Ditto what osprey said, unless you are with people who understand, keep that thought to yourself, unless you feel like dealing w/ the looks & comments"[/blue] And when does life go back to normal? [blue]What is "normal"? IMHO, seeing personal combat up close and personal changes you in a fundmental way. Its up to you to insure that change impacts your life in a positive way.[/blue] Oh, and when does the guilt of being home go away? [blue]I've been out since '91 & I still feel like I should be there.[/blue] Thanks for the help and thank god for the VFW, DG84
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Link Posted: 12/7/2003 5:50:50 AM EDT
Originally Posted By doorgunner84: How long does it take before you can stop walking around, looking at people, or listening to people before you stop thinking..... "you people have no fucking clue what's going on." Will people always look at you like you're crazy when you say "I'd go back in a heart beat."? And when does life go back to normal? Thanks for the help and thank god for the VFW, DG84
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First off, realize there is your world and the real world. They are clueless about your world but you have to live in theirs, unless you stay in. If you'd go back in a heart beat, why get out? Some people like the life and enjoy it. Reminds me of that Clint Eastwood movie, Heartbreak Ridge. AS you integrate back into society by getting a job, raising a family, etc. the old life gets to be more like just a memory and not so real. Wean yourself away from the VFW as fast as possible, unless you want to be one of those guys still reliving his war after 20 years. Make some new memories. 1/327 101 St. Abn (Airmobile)
Link Posted: 12/7/2003 5:58:42 AM EDT
As a Gulf vet, I agree with Echo6 wholeheartedly on all three points. I've been out since '95 and there isn't a day that passes that I don't want to be over there now. There also isn't a day that goes by that I'm not supefied by the complete horseshit and total lack of sense that I see and hear around me. Face it...you have been to a place where the vast minority of Americans will ever go and it changes you for life. What's even more sickening are the people who HAVE been there and still don't have a fucking clue. I can think of one presedential wannabe...
Link Posted: 12/7/2003 6:11:43 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 12/7/2003 6:12:34 AM EDT by DSVET91]
Originally Posted By doorgunner84: How long does it take before you can stop walking around, looking at people, or listening to people before you stop thinking..... "you people have no fucking clue what's going on." [blue]Its been 13 years for me and to this day, I still think that about most people I meet. I just try to ignore them now, all except the non-vet POS that told me one day that Desert Storm wasn't a real war. I punched his lights out, not something that I am proud of but, sometimes you just have to matters in hand and deal directly with assholes.[/blue] Will people always look at you like you're crazy when you say "I'd go back in a heart beat."? [blue]Yes.[/blue] And when does life go back to normal? [blue] Never really gets back to "normal", you just adjust and move on with life and try to live it to the best of your ability. I still have nightmares, especially with certain smells. And yes thank God for the VFW, I have been a member for 10 years now. If you need to talk or anything shoot me a email or IM me here.[/blue] Thanks for the help and thank god for the VFW, DG84
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Link Posted: 12/7/2003 6:16:54 AM EDT
Keep your chin up and your chest out. Everyone adjusts to their surroundings at a different pace. Some adjust completely some never adjust at all. Make your own decisions and choose your own paths.
Link Posted: 12/7/2003 6:19:00 AM EDT
It never goes back to normal....... You are you and only Combat VEts will understand You.... Fuck Everyone who isnt willing to accept the way you are. I havent had a good night sleep in years.....
Link Posted: 12/7/2003 6:22:13 AM EDT
especially with certain smells.
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Why is it that smells are (at least to me) the STRONGEST sensory input to trigger memories?
Link Posted: 12/7/2003 6:33:18 AM EDT
Originally Posted By echo6:
especially with certain smells.
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Why is it that smells are (at least to me) the STRONGEST sensory input to trigger memories?
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I have noticed the same; however, it is the food. My favorite foods are now the ones that are part of the "hostile" environment gatherings that I have been invited to. I had some YUMMY middle eastern yesterday for lunch......
Link Posted: 12/7/2003 6:38:30 AM EDT
Originally Posted By echo6:
especially with certain smells.
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Why is it that smells are (at least to me) the STRONGEST sensory input to trigger memories?
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I have wondered that myself, diesal exhaust is one that gets me every time, as well as overcooked/burned meat. One smell that I don't care to smell ever again is burning shitters. I hated being in charge of that detail.
Link Posted: 12/7/2003 6:41:41 AM EDT
God bless every single one of you vet's. I mean that with all sincerity, as I get older I really wish I had made some different choices as a young man. College and getting some military service is just the tip of the iceberg. Sounds crazy but, we need people who want to get in combat. I wish I could go right now and fight for my country. [USA]
Link Posted: 12/7/2003 6:43:59 AM EDT
Originally Posted By doorgunner84: How long does it take before you can stop walking around, looking at people, or listening to people before you stop thinking..... "you people have no fucking clue what's going on."
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I got out in '68, and I'm STILL thinkin' it...
Will people always look at you like you're crazy when you say "I'd go back in a heart beat."?
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I never had THAT problem, I'd NEVER go back, not after the govt lied to us in OUR war..Fuck 'em, when the threat is within my AO, I'll act.
And when does life go back to normal?
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It's "normal" now, get used to it. It will NEVER be like it was for you.
Thanks for the help and thank god for the VFW, DG84
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Spending many sleepless nights??? Welcome to the crowd...... [:D] You'll get tired of the same old shit/stories at VFW, or anyplace else for that matter... Married? got kids?? Hope not........ Good luck.
Link Posted: 12/7/2003 6:45:47 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 12/7/2003 6:46:42 AM EDT by armabill]
I was in 'Nam in 1965, Marines (Div. Recon). I thought that I was over the feeling but when 9/11 happened, I wish that I could go back in and kick some ass. Man, was I pissed!!! Still am.
Link Posted: 12/7/2003 6:55:08 AM EDT
Please don't let that PTSD monster eat you alive. Get to the VA and get into the PTSD program. Lots of good info and a lot of good people.
Link Posted: 12/7/2003 11:10:06 AM EDT
Originally Posted By echo6:
especially with certain smells.
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Why is it that smells are (at least to me) the STRONGEST sensory input to trigger memories?
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The sense of smell is closely connected to the memory processing center of the inner brain. It is a matter of brain function. Thus smells trigger strong memories.
Link Posted: 12/7/2003 1:19:41 PM EDT
As some have suggested to disconnect IE get away from the VFW, that is their way but I gave that a shot and it did'nt work for me. I could not just flush certain negative feelings away no matter how hard I tried. For me talking to others that saw more "shit" than me helped. Just try to stay busy and when your having a downy talk to somebody who understands. My wife knows she can't help but can see it setting in on me and gives me ride to VFW two hours later she picks me up and all is better.
Link Posted: 12/7/2003 1:23:07 PM EDT
Nationwide killing sprees relieve tension.
Link Posted: 12/7/2003 5:05:15 PM EDT
combat vets: thank you for serving
Link Posted: 12/7/2003 10:31:41 PM EDT
A friend of mine served for 26 years. His day in combat was during the 1st war in Iraq. He told me he would happily go back. He doesnt like being deployed, or seeing action, but he still feels he's not doing his job.
Link Posted: 12/7/2003 10:39:07 PM EDT
30 years after Vietnam, I have gotten used to the fact that until you do some time in the field, I probably won't take you seriously.
Link Posted: 12/7/2003 10:59:28 PM EDT
I have wondered that myself, diesal exhaust is one that gets me every time, as well as overcooked/burned meat.
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Oh Jesus, me too… No fucken way would I go back. I’ll never step foot in a VFW either. I don’t blame anyone for being cereous, but I hate the questions. I’d just rather civilian didn’t know. I get along fine until my wife or family start bragging on me. I don’t have the heart too tell ‘em I hate it. My worst episode was walking under breeze way between buildings in College after I got out. Lightning struck the building nearby and I hit the deck instantly. There I was sprawled flat on the ground, books and papers everywhere, and all my peers looking at me like I am a fucking crazy man. To this day I still catch my self looking for booby traps. My wife is out of town on business so I just finished 3 stiff drinks and ”Apocalypse Now Redux”…
Link Posted: 12/7/2003 11:13:47 PM EDT
Link Posted: 12/7/2003 11:19:54 PM EDT
Originally Posted By markl32: My worst episode was walking under breeze way between buildings in College after I got out. Lightning struck the building nearby and I hit the deck instantly. There I was sprawled flat on the ground, books and papers everywhere, and all my peers looking at me like I am a fucking crazy man.
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Same thing happened to me, but in different circumstances. It was August '91 and I was at my 3rd Ga. NG drill. We was all sitting around inside the open bay cleaning weapons, because of a pretty serious thunderstorm going on, I was sitting on a pile of camo nets when a bolt of lightning hit a tree outside, sounded just like an arty round impacting. Needless to say I rolled off them nets and was flat on my stomach in a split second. After I realized that everything was all right, I slowly stood up. Every body was looking at me like I was some kind of nut. Fuck 'em, if they had been worth a shit, they would have went to Saudi instead of NTC.
Link Posted: 12/8/2003 5:58:58 AM EDT
Originally Posted By Da_Bunny: 30 years after Vietnam, I have gotten used to the fact that until you do some time in the field, I probably won't take you seriously.
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Some of us didn't grow up until it was too late. But I did grow up and respect the hell out of those who serve(d). I wish I had known better when I was that age. There is nothing more important than the thing you believe in. Like God, Country and Family. I realize somethimes we feel like we can't believe in Country anymore, but most of us citizens live our lives the way America was supposed to be, with the exception of many being "sheeple", and believing what they hear and allowing politicians to get away with what they do. Thanks for your service and now find a way to move on. You did what you had to do then and now you need to do what you have to do today and tomorrow. No one can make you be happy unless you want to be happy. Believe that. Your outlook will temper how outside conditions affect you. Life is part of moving on. Don't feel bad you are gone from duty. That's life. Others come along to take your place. And time moves on. Sometimes I wish I could o back to the good times in my past. I wish my Grandfather was still around and I could go back to that time and place. He was the closest I have ever been to anyone besides my wife. And obviously in a different way that mainly only men can relate to. I assume that is why you mention wanting to go back. Most of the vets I talk with tell stories about the guys they served with, much more than "war stories." If you were able to go back again, most of the guys you remember would have moved on by now, most likely. Good luck.
Link Posted: 12/8/2003 6:16:34 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 12/8/2003 6:19:41 AM EDT by EdAvilaSr]
Link Posted: 12/8/2003 6:33:11 AM EDT
I agree with what most have said. What used to be "normal" isn't, what is now "normal" will forever be that way. Call it "enlightenment" or whatever, but it will always be with you as your new lifestyle. For me, there isn't a day when I would not go back. I loved being deployed and doing my job at whatever mission was thrown my way. I hated garrison and the BS that it entailed. Those of us who have been there or are there know what your are feeling. It is a brotherhood that will always stand and listen to you and others who have served. God bless you all and be safe. P.S. A day at the range usually helps me to quell the demons.
Link Posted: 12/8/2003 6:42:39 AM EDT
I spent almost 36 months in Vietnam but I never looked back. I don't define my life with my time in combat. It was one hell of an experience. I would not take 10 million dollars to go back but I would not sell my experience for 10 million dollars. To this day I cannot visit the Wall in DC. I would fall apart. I very seldom talk about any of my experiences with anyone except fellow veteran and even that is rare. I have been married for 32 years and have not spent more than 15 minutes talking about Vietnam with my wife. Recently I came across my old uniform and some pictures and with nobody around I just sat and cried for ten minutes. It took me a couple of years to get over being nervous when going to the range and hearing SKS or AK gunfire. One of my friends has a Class III AK and I hate to hear it being shot full auto. It makes my blood run cold. I cried to myself when seeing "We Were Soldiers". You never get over but life goes on. I feel the same way as Da Bunny: Originally Posted By Da_Bunny: 30 years after Vietnam, I have gotten used to the fact that until you do some time in the field, I probably won't take you seriously.
Link Posted: 12/8/2003 7:09:54 AM EDT
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