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Posted: 11/18/2003 6:59:57 PM EDT
I have always had a problem with the series 80 guns. No particular reason, I have just developed an unfounded bias towards them. I guess I consider them not as good as the older guns or not the real deal.

Anyway what I want to know is--is there any reason to stay away from series 80 pistols? Are they safer than the series 70? If the pistol is cocked and locked how safe is it if is dropped?(which happens with my CCW more than I care to admit)

I guess I just want to know if the series 80s are indeed safer or better?
Link Posted: 11/18/2003 7:05:26 PM EDT
Good question I'd like to know as well, and maybe someone could throw in which manufacturers are still producing 70 series. I know Colt just reintroduced one and maybe Kimbers are 70's? Sorry I couldnt help you out 455SD
Link Posted: 11/18/2003 7:06:49 PM EDT
I prefer, the 70's series, but I have owned three 80's series with no bad experience's.


They all preformed as required. I just prefer the 70's, fewer parts, simpler action.
Link Posted: 11/18/2003 7:08:07 PM EDT
I carried a Delta Gold Cup for many years, As far as it being a 80 series (with the added features), safety was not an issue to me, cocked and locked is all I know. I must say, I never once dropped this firearm so, I cannot comment on such a practice.
Link Posted: 11/18/2003 7:08:54 PM EDT
Springfield Armory makes the 70 series. As for the 80 series IMO a solution for a problem that did not exist, it was proved that you had to drop the gun from a height of like ten feet onto a hard surface, right onto the muzzle to make it go off. Now if your that sloppy with your gun, maybe you do need the 80 series.
Link Posted: 11/18/2003 7:10:09 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Keithl84:
Good question I'd like to know as well, and maybe someone could throw in which manufacturers are still producing 70 series. I know Colt just reintroduced one and maybe Kimbers are 70's? Sorry I couldnt help you out 455SD



Kimber series I were like the 70's, the series II are like the 80's.


STI's are like the 70's and so are the Wilson's and the pre locking MSH Springfields.

There are more than those, just named a few.
Link Posted: 11/18/2003 7:18:19 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Keithl84:
Good question I'd like to know as well, and maybe someone could throw in which manufacturers are still producing 70 series. I know Colt just reintroduced one and maybe Kimbers are 70's? Sorry I couldnt help you out 455SD



It'd be a lot easier to list the guns that DO have firing pin safeties.

Colt Series 80, 1991A1, Enhanced and XSE have the Series 80 FPS.

Para-Ordnance is licensed by Colt to use the Series 80 FPS in all their guns.

Kimber did not have firing pin safeties until the Series II, which uses a Swartz type FPS, activated off the grip safety, not the Series 80 type.
Link Posted: 11/18/2003 7:27:41 PM EDT
Just buy a new series 70, beautiful pistols.
Link Posted: 11/18/2003 8:06:25 PM EDT
So, as far as function and safety, there really isn't much difference?
Link Posted: 11/18/2003 8:13:07 PM EDT

Originally Posted By 455SD:
So, as far as function and safety, there really isn't much difference?


Some poeple claim that you can't get a good smooth & light trigger because of the extra moving parts for the firing pin lock, but personally I can't feel the difference because I'm not that good. Maybe if you're a Mickey Fowler you can feel the difference.
Link Posted: 11/18/2003 8:34:29 PM EDT
I have a series 80 stainless Gold Cup. I shot it for around 5yrs maybe 15,000 rnds when the series 80 parts jammed the trigger so hard that it took fingers from both hands to pull the trigger. This was from one IPSC stage to the next. To take the part out and look at them I could not see uneven wear. So I just left the 80s parts out and have shot the pistol just fine for another 8yrs now.
Link Posted: 11/19/2003 3:02:21 AM EDT
I have a Series 80 and have put 30,000 + rounds through it. I have had no problems of any type.

For what it's worth.
Link Posted: 11/19/2003 3:42:47 AM EDT
I have a colt 1911, a 1991 Gov and a 1991 commander. For carry, I like the idea of the 80 series firing pin stop with a round in the pipe. A hammer does not have a lot of weight but it has enough momentum to send the firing pin to the primer. What would a three foot drop do?

The only issue with the 80's saftey is if you are trying to get a trigger pull down past 4 to 3.5 lbs. That is about where I want my ccw pistol anyway.

Cylinder and Slide make slicked up and polished parts that allow a trigger pull down to 2.5 lb.

I polish mine up with the drimel and polishing compound. Works for me.
Link Posted: 11/19/2003 10:16:45 AM EDT
Series 80 guns work fine, however I prefer the non-Series 80 guns myself. As to safety differences, I suppose the Series 80 is theoretically safer. Practically speaking, not a damn bit of difference unless you're a darwin award contender.
Link Posted: 11/19/2003 10:31:04 AM EDT
As most have mentioned, the only thing is that the trigger is harder to tune due to more moving parts. That's about it. That and nostalgia of the series 70.
Link Posted: 11/19/2003 10:37:18 AM EDT

Originally Posted By FreeAmerican:
I have a colt 1911, a 1991 Gov and a 1991 commander. For carry, I like the idea of the 80 series firing pin stop with a round in the pipe. A hammer does not have a lot of weight but it has enough momentum to send the firing pin to the primer. What would a three foot drop do?




What the heck do you think that the half cock notch on the S70's and older is for?

The series 80's came out due to a PERCIEVED legal issue.

If someone drops a gun and it discharges, then it's the USERS FAULT, not the gun's fault.

Link Posted: 11/19/2003 11:03:25 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 11/19/2003 11:04:07 AM EDT by MAC-DADDY]
Here's my .45matic COLT 1991A1 Stainless Series 80 that I have had NO problems with the FPS AT ALL.It's a great pistol.

Link Posted: 11/19/2003 11:24:11 AM EDT
Let's think this through, fellows.

If you were to drop a series 70 from 10 feet onto the muzzle, the momentum could cause the firing pin to fire the pistol.

So, in the very unlikely-hood that this happened....where would the round go?

Right into the ground.

Why worry about such an issue? Personally, I don't drop my guns.
Link Posted: 11/19/2003 12:27:52 PM EDT
When the FBI went looking for a 1911 for their regional SWAT teams they were originally going to mandate the Series 80 safety. Since thats strictly Colt territory without paying fees, it presented a problem. Springfield successfully demostrated that a 1911 with an extra power firing pin spring and a titanium firing pin would pass the drop test...and it did. I prefer to stick with just the xp spring and a standard firing pin.

Maintain your spring, and inspect your parts for wear and its highly unlikely you'll have a discharge. There was actually a basis for concern with older GI models, in that the ones in military use were VERY old and VERY worn out. If the thing want bang when you pulled the trigger, there was no need to replace parts until they break as far as the military was concerned. I replace the firing pin spring at the same point when I replace my recoil spring (Wolff puts them in the same package), so its no big deal. My guns get torn down and inspected for wear every one to two years depending on the round count. Its simple, maintain your stuff.
Link Posted: 11/20/2003 12:48:09 AM EDT
nothing wrong with the S80s, just people who complain about not being able to get a super light trigger.
the only real problem ive heard is that a dirty gun can cause the firing pin plunger to get stuck and cause problems. like someone said before all these S80 parts can be removed and the gun will work fine, and just as safe as S70.

regarding the S70 vs the S80 hammers, there is very little difference in them, in reality the S80 hammers do not interact at all with the S80 safety parts, and ive heard that many S80 guns came with the S70 hammers.
the difference is on a S70 hammer is a small hook on the half cock notch/ledge, S80 doesnt have this hook. the half cock is to prevent a discharge if your thumb slips off the hammer while trying to cock it.

the S70 hooked hammer means if the gun is in half cock you have to pull the hammer back and then release it by pulling the trigger and thumbing down the hammer, which is an unsafe thing to do.
the S80 hookless hammer means if the gun is in half cock, all you have to do is pull the trigger to Safely reset the hammer forward, so thumbing it down while pulling the trigger is not required.

next time you see a S80 gun, cock it into half cock, then pull the trigger, the hammer will click back forward with very little movement and force.

so you could swap hammers between S70 and 80 and not affect any other parts.
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