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Posted: 11/15/2003 9:52:01 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 11/16/2003 7:16:18 PM EDT by Corey]
Our sink is starting to come loose in the countertop.

I've seen other sinks that have a little lip running underneath the insides for securing the sink with clips and screws. Our sink doesn't have any type of attachment point for these clips.

How is a sink like this secured?

It looks like it was originally just held in place with plumbers putty or something like that.

Any ideas? I'd kind'a like to crank this project out this afternoon.

Thanks,

Corey
Link Posted: 11/15/2003 9:55:31 AM EDT
It was glued down. Water probably got under it and started to lift it. Only thing I can think of is dry it out and put more caulk around it.
Link Posted: 11/15/2003 9:59:29 AM EDT
Ditto. Use a tube of silicone caulk/adhesive.
Link Posted: 11/15/2003 10:00:36 AM EDT

Originally Posted By ZRH:
It was glued down. Water probably got under it and started to lift it. Only thing I can think of is dry it out and put more caulk around it.



you could pull it up, clean it and reinstall and it should be good as new as long as your counter top is good
Link Posted: 11/15/2003 10:08:37 AM EDT
do yall know what the term "secure building" mean for different branches of Armed Forces? such as cop/navy/army/marine?
I thought something like 'evacuate the hostage? set up perimeter for extraction?'
Then he says...let me tell ya future leaders what the term of "secure building" means. You must remember this because you would need to know this term in the service of your branches.
The term "secure building" for the cop is to move out all the people near the building safely without cost any lost lives, or even injuries.
As for the few and the proud U.S marine, your definition of "secure building" is storm the building and kill everyone.
Being the army of one, you, as a soldier, your job for "secure building" is call for air strike. So the air force can help y'all and drop some bombz on da target.
lastly the navy boys... your job of "secure building" is to turn off the light, shut down computer, and lock the door, run for cover and call back up.

Link Posted: 11/15/2003 10:10:10 AM EDT

Originally Posted By superdav:

Originally Posted By ZRH:
It was glued down. Water probably got under it and started to lift it. Only thing I can think of is dry it out and put more caulk around it.



you could pull it up, clean it and reinstall and it should be good as new as long as your counter top is good



Yeah, I was going to say tear it out and get a quality sink but not everyone is that involved.
Link Posted: 11/15/2003 10:19:22 AM EDT
Thanks for the quick replies guys. I just might get this done today.

Now, last question:

Is standard bathroom silicone caulk okay? I looked at an old tube downstairs and it did say that it was "adhesive."

Thanks again.

Corey
Link Posted: 11/15/2003 10:29:06 AM EDT
Dont know what you have but the stuff you use in the bathroom to seal around the shower and stuff isnt the right kind. You need waterproof+adhesive silicone caulk. You probably have the right stuff.
Link Posted: 11/15/2003 10:40:11 AM EDT
Pull that puppy out and clean the whole mess, then reinstall it with silicone caulk adhesive. Be generous with the caulk and use a wet sponge to shape it when your done.
Link Posted: 11/15/2003 10:56:45 AM EDT
Thanks everyone! I'll give it a shot.

Corey
Link Posted: 11/15/2003 5:01:34 PM EDT
Well? How did it turn out?????
Link Posted: 11/15/2003 5:17:17 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Corey:
Thanks for the quick replies guys. I just might get this done today.

Now, last question:

Is standard bathroom silicone caulk okay? I looked at an old tube downstairs and it did say that it was "adhesive."

Thanks again.



I'd use DAP!

Corey

Link Posted: 11/15/2003 6:53:21 PM EDT
Hey! I bought DAP! Kwik seal plus, kitchen and bath adhesive caulk.

Didn't get it done during nap time today. Spent some quality time sorting our my SHTF ammo stash -- just got another (big!) ammo can last night at the funshow. Now, I can grab one can and have [intentianally left blank] rounds of M193, as well as .45, 9mm and .22LR (there is a 1911 conversion kit in my future, I can feel it...). Oh, and cleaned my 1911.

So, the sink had to wait until tomorrow's nap time.

I'll report back in tomorrow. But I think things will go fine.

(which reminds me )
Link Posted: 11/15/2003 7:04:27 PM EDT
You can get a brand new kitchen sink for about $75. Stainless steel and 9" deep. Bite the bullet and drop some Benjamins.
Link Posted: 11/15/2003 7:30:54 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Pangea:
You can get a brand new kitchen sink for about $75. Stainless steel and 9" deep. Bite the bullet and drop some Benjamins.



Yeah, I would do that but we're building a new house in the next 9-12 months and if we started sticking money into this house on things like this it would never end.

But don't worry about me being a cheapskate. When we moved into this house and had to replace our garbage disposal, I asked what HP is recommended for general home use. I bought the model 2 levels above that.

Corey
Link Posted: 11/15/2003 9:22:05 PM EDT
Sounds like you were lucky. We had a couple of handyguys here before us. (Handyguy is about 90% handyman and 10% flaming idiot) Probably about half the counter top would have come up. You know they used epoxy where caulk should have been used, caulk instead of regrouting caused leaks into wall spaces. Replaced 2 prong electric outlets with grounded outlets but didn't ground half of them.

We're still finding goof-ups 15 years later.
Link Posted: 11/15/2003 9:39:18 PM EDT
Just call a freacking plumber, you cheap ....

Link Posted: 11/15/2003 9:40:04 PM EDT

Originally Posted By DoubleFeed:
do yall know what the term "secure building" mean for different branches of Armed Forces? such as cop/navy/army/marine?
I thought something like 'evacuate the hostage? set up perimeter for extraction?'
Then he says...let me tell ya future leaders what the term of "secure building" means. You must remember this because you would need to know this term in the service of your branches.
The term "secure building" for the cop is to move out all the people near the building safely without cost any lost lives, or even injuries.
As for the few and the proud U.S marine, your definition of "secure building" is storm the building and kill everyone.
Being the army of one, you, as a soldier, your job for "secure building" is call for air strike. So the air force can help y'all and drop some bombz on da target.
lastly the navy boys... your job of "secure building" is to turn off the light, shut down computer, and lock the door, run for cover and call back up.



heh.. well I thought he meant in case of a robbery.. as a joke
"they took everything 'cept the kitchen sink"
Link Posted: 11/16/2003 7:13:25 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 11/16/2003 7:27:11 PM EDT by Corey]
Okay, here's the deal.

At approximately 1230 hours I commenced this operation. Following is an AAR.

1. Disassemble the sink, including the water and drain pipes, garbage disposal, etc. (and major PITA dishwasher vent). Realize that we actually have a spray nozzle, it's just taped to a pipe underneath the sink as there isn't enough holes in the sink to pop it through [insert music for Monster Kitchen].

2. Clean everything up, including inside the sink cabinet.

3. Talk with my wife about possibility of new sink. Research new sinks on the internet, realize that basic stainless steel sinks will be $125 or so and still not be likely to have clamp down rails (some companies use "no need for sink clamps!" as a selling point -- WTF??). Add to that the fact that a new sink will probably mean we'll want a new faucet, etc. ($200+), I decide to drive on with our current sink. The current sink is an otherwise nice stainless steel unit with nice looking faucet/knobs.

4. If we've got everything all ripped apart, I'm going to replace the 4 year old (ripped up) garbage disposal splash guard and drain J joints that were prone to leaking. I'm also adding (dammit!) The spray nozzle now that I'm into this thing up to my eyeballs. So it's off to True Value for a splash guard, 2 J joints, sink coupling (“holster”?) for the spray nozzle, another tube of adhesive caulk, a ¾” drill bit and centering bit to drill the spray nozzle hole, and a needle nose pliers (needed for the C clip on the spray nozzle – I lost/misplaced my needle nose pliers about a year ago and spent $15 on the higher end model) – TOTAL: $75 minus a return on $12 worth of sink clips (that I found out didn’t work on my sink).

5. Back home I started with drilling the spray nozzle hole. Hmmm, a 1” stainless steel disk that shows evidence of extreme heat and sports an approximate 9mm center hole…. And tonight is garbage night. Can I assume that “someone else” will be picking up my garbage tomorrow morning?? [:\]

6. Install the spray nozzle coupling/”holster” with caulk under it to insure a water tight fit.

7. Okay, so now let’s start by spreading caulk (generously) underneath the sink. Sink goes on, and everything looks cool. Detail work on the caulk will have to wait until I’ve got everything hooked up as it will probably cause the sink to shift. The caulk is dripping down the inside of the sink hole in the countertop, which should really hold it in place. I subscribe to the “Bigger Hammer” theory.

8. Install all the other pipes, and the new rubber J joints work great.

9. Heave the garbage disposal up and torque it on – luckily it has a QR sleeve and only needs to be positioned under the sink coupling, with a quick turn locking it on. The new splash guard was installed before this.

10. Now, it’s back to finishing the caulking. Our sink isn’t really level, so I had to be really careful to get a good caulking seal all the way around. I basically finished it with my fingers – just like I did during my successful rebuild of the master shower glass doors. After letting it sit for a few hours, I put duct tape over the seam b/w the top of the sink and the countertop(but not touching the caulk). At least this way, we can use the sink for “light duty” for the next 2 hours.

11. Everything is hooked up, working well and not leaking. The whole project took about 5 hours from start to finish, including about 1 hour searching for parts at the hardware store.

12. After getting the family in bed for the night, I retreat (“advance to the rear!!”) to the computer room where these words are typed – while the History channel provides a subtle distraction, and I get a few beers down my throat.

So, all in all a very busy weekend.

Thanks for the advice!

Corey

PS Next “advice needed” thread will be about the front suspension bushings in my ’97 Honda Accord EX that are squeaking during the colder months (they’re still good, but just “dry” per the mechanics – though they offer to replace these annoying but still mechanically sound bushing for $500+). BTW, I’ve maintained this vehicle very well and want to run it for a few more years. But dang this squeaking I annoying….
Link Posted: 11/18/2003 6:38:33 PM EDT
Corey,
For your Honda, a generous application of spray on Silicone grease should do the trick and not harm the rubber....

Link Posted: 11/18/2003 6:48:07 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Corey:
Okay, here's the deal.
PS Next “advice needed” thread will be about the front suspension bushings in my ’97 Honda Accord EX that are squeaking during the colder months (they’re still good, but just “dry” per the mechanics – though they offer to replace these annoying but still mechanically sound bushing for $500+).


I would also drown the the bushings in silicone spray. GEt them at Wal-mart. If that don't help, at an auto-parts store they have this stuff called rubber lube, it has small crystals of wax to help lube the bushing to prevent squeaking.
Link Posted: 11/18/2003 7:26:38 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 11/18/2003 7:55:55 PM EDT by Corey]
TheKill and warlord:

Thanks for the advice on my Honda!

I think I should be able to poke around and locate the bushings.

But how do I get the spray down deep inside of them?

Our mechanics say they tried to lube them, but I don't necessarily think they did much more than a cursory spray.

If this works I think I'm going to send you each a bottle of beer!

Corey

EDITED to add that the sink project was a HUGE success! Thanks again.
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