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Posted: 7/2/2003 5:29:10 PM EDT
Link Posted: 7/2/2003 5:32:20 PM EDT
Link Posted: 7/2/2003 6:02:04 PM EDT
umm...again....for a newbie: what does IBTL mean anyway?
Link Posted: 7/2/2003 6:06:00 PM EDT
it means In B4 The LOck, its when a topic gets outa hand or is mindless. although i dont see why this one would be? seems harmless to me. lol
Link Posted: 7/2/2003 6:10:10 PM EDT
... truly amazing history. Another along those lines was the story of quote:
The Hughes Glomar Explorer [HGE] was built in 1973 by Sun Shipbuilding and Drydock Co. for an intricate CIA undertaking. The mission of Glomar Explorer was to raise a Soviet nulear submarine that had sunk in the Pacific, resting on the ocean floor nearly 17,000 ft. (5,200 m) down. The Soviet Golf-II Class ballistic missile submarine sank on April 11, 1968, approximately 750 miles northwest of Hawaii. Naval intelligence at Pearl Harbor had tracked the submarine and learned of its fate through underwater listening devices. After months of futile searching by Soviet vessels, it became apparent that only the US knew the location of the sunken submarine.
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... amazing stuff
Link Posted: 7/2/2003 7:14:30 PM EDT
Link Posted: 7/2/2003 7:23:55 PM EDT
You want to read amazing Cold War submarine stories? Read [u]Blind Man's Bluff[/u]. I guarantee, this book will make your jaw drop. Here is a teaser: A US Navy submarine captain got his SSN so far into a Soviet harbor, he could see the docks 40 yards away through his periscope. Fly Navy
Link Posted: 7/2/2003 8:49:33 PM EDT
I worked in a shipyard repairing subs for over 30 years and saw a lot of them come in during "the cold war" with damage to odd areas with stories that were even stranger. First sub was the Grampus(diesel) and the last was the Hampton at the base(vertical launch, bow planes and lots of other good stuff). My favorite was the 637 class. I just finished watching "Red October" again and am still surprised when I see the Dallas,supposed to be a 688,but it has vertical stabilizers on the stern planes and they didn't put them on 688's. I was a kid delivering newspapers when the Thresher went down. The photo and story was on the front page of our local paper. I saw some films and got the details years later in the yard.There were a lot of changes in welding, inspection and shipboard systems as a result of that sinking.We lost the crew and about 15-20 yard workers from Portsmouth Naval Shipyard. I did work on the Scorpion a year before it sank. It was due in for some more work shortly after it failed to return. Don't know what happened there, some speculate that it could have been 'A hot run" on a torpedo that got stuck in the tube. I never got a chance to go out on a sub, not much need for a shipfitter on post repair trails. My youngest son is a marine machinist and he went out on the Rickover PRT for 5 days and did a deep dive.
Link Posted: 7/2/2003 9:07:15 PM EDT
I went on a tiger cruise on my brother's SSBN, the Wyoming. The governor of Wyoming was on the ship, as well as some members of some of the crews family. We went out for two days, but before diving they showed us a video about this hood you put over your head, how to pressurize the escape hatch thing, and how to breath on the way up. After this 10-15 minute instructional video, the XO proceeds to tell us that we will be operating below "critical depth" and if there was a breach in the hall, none of us would ever know. Also, they showed us the movie, new at the time, "Crimson Tide" while we were out on a ballistic missile submarine.[BD] The Kursk pissed the hell out of me. Watching that on the news, and the Russians declining help made me imagine how I'd feel if my brother was on a sub in that situation. Oh, BTW, SSBN's are full-auto MIRV tipped ballistic missile launchers. And I thought quake was ridiculous. You pull the trigger back on this pistol grip connected to a wire to the computer, and it continues to launch ICBMs every 20-30 seconds. So, you need a form 4 to buy one. And its pre-ban, 24 rounds.
Link Posted: 7/2/2003 9:12:50 PM EDT
Reloader-Bob: USS DALLAS (SSN-700) is a Flight I 688-class boat. Starting with Flight III (SSN-751), the fairwater planes are on the BOW, not the SAIL. Here is my reference: http://www.warships1.com/ships-US/USssn688_LA.htm
Link Posted: 7/2/2003 9:39:34 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Fly-Navy: You want to read amazing Cold War submarine stories? Read [u]Blind Man's Bluff[/u]. I guarantee, this book will make your jaw drop. Here is a teaser: A US Navy submarine captain got his SSN so far into a Soviet harbor, he could see the docks 40 yards away through his periscope. Fly Navy
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Ditto!
Link Posted: 7/2/2003 9:44:43 PM EDT
James Bamford's BODY OF SECRETS is also a great book about the NSA with chapters about submarine espionage.
Link Posted: 7/2/2003 10:16:47 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Winston_Wolf: ... truly amazing history. Another along those lines was the story of quote:
The Soviet Golf-II Class ballistic missile submarine sank on April 11, 1968
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... amazing stuff
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Yeah amazing, the EXACT day, month and year of my birth!!!!!!!!! Some luck.
Link Posted: 7/2/2003 10:23:28 PM EDT
I watched Das Boot about 8 times. Dubbed, subtitled, directors cut and regular release versions.
Link Posted: 7/2/2003 10:38:16 PM EDT
I only worked on the Boats for 3 years (1971-73) as a Nuclear Project Engineer at EB in Groton, CT. Worked on a lot of overhaul nukes and some new construction (including one 688 class prior to my quiting EB). I worked with a couple of retired Navy Chiefs and only asked about the Thresher once! The Chief I worked with was detailed to call the next of kin and lost a lot of friends on that Boat, so I had to do my own research. There were a few good books on the subject, but it is so long ago that I can't recall titles. A neighbor was on one of the SSBNs and told me that he once went up to the Con and looked at the maps of where they were and swore never to do that again! They were in inland waters of a river in the USSR. They were frequently depth charged by the not so friendly Russians. I got to work on the SSN571 (USS Nautilus) up to the SSN68x (can't recall the number). Had the most fun with the Navy crews on the SSBN634 and SSN650 (USS Pargo, IIRC). Never did get to go out on a cruise. Refused to go on one when my turn came up for sea trials(it was SSN68x) as the Captain and a few of his officers were total assholes and I wouldn't trust my life in their hands. These three officers were the only ones that I ever worked with that I couldn't trust, all other officers and enlisted were "aces" and I'd trust them any day of the week! Had an opportunity to go on a cruise with the SSN650 but blew it, we came up to Boston that weekend instead. They were a great crew to work with. XO (IIRC) of SSBN634 was a Cmdr Henry Morgan (from Boston area IIRC) and he had a great sense of humor . . . kept us in stitches much of the time. Submarine Service is unlike any other part of the US Navy. It's a real "family" on the Boats, as they must all rely on each other to survive. Very little formality in addressing officers, etc. but they work well as a team.
Link Posted: 7/3/2003 4:01:27 AM EDT
Link Posted: 7/3/2003 4:44:24 AM EDT
Former crewmember of the USS Tucson (SSN 770)
Link Posted: 7/3/2003 4:54:22 AM EDT
Blind Man's Bluff was amazing. I know a couple guys who were on subs and they said "I can't tell you if what's in the book is true, but I was there." A friend of mine got me on the Tecumseh in Charleston between patrols for a tour. Cool stuff. It takes a special kind of man to get into a boat that is intentionally sunk! [;)]
Link Posted: 7/3/2003 4:56:52 AM EDT
Originally Posted By BYU:
Originally Posted By Fly-Navy: You want to read amazing Cold War submarine stories? Read [u]Blind Man's Bluff[/u]. I guarantee, this book will make your jaw drop. Here is a teaser: A US Navy submarine captain got his SSN so far into a Soviet harbor, he could see the docks 40 yards away through his periscope. Fly Navy
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Ditto!
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Ditto! Ditto!
Link Posted: 7/3/2003 5:56:16 PM EDT
Link Posted: 7/3/2003 6:23:59 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Steve-in-VA: Just went to dinner with my wife and stopped off at Borders and bought BMB. Hope it's as good as you guys say.
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Its even better than they say.
Link Posted: 7/3/2003 7:04:20 PM EDT
Blind Man's Bluff doesn't even BEGIN to describe what was/is being done. I worked Naval Intelligence in DC and we use to get the after action reports (????? Blue was the report name, but can't remember the 1st word). Stuff was classified up the ying-yang. Going into harbors, tailing new vessels, 'observing' tests and trials, putting spooks ashore, 'stealing' torpedoes/missle test shots. Even got to see a few of the spook reports. Pretty incredible stuff.
Link Posted: 7/3/2003 7:47:39 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Red-Bucket-98: Reloader-Bob: USS DALLAS (SSN-700) is a Flight I 688-class boat. Starting with Flight III (SSN-751), the fairwater planes are on the BOW, not the SAIL. Here is my reference: http://www.warships1.com/ships-US/USssn688_LA.htm
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That's not what he's talking about. He's talking about the vertical stabilizers on the stern planes. Think mini-tails on the end of each stern plane.
Blind Man's Bluff doesn't even BEGIN to describe what was/is being done. I worked Naval Intelligence in DC and we use to get the after action reports (????? Blue was the report name, but can't remember the 1st word). Stuff was classified up the ying-yang. Going into harbors, tailing new vessels, 'observing' tests and trials, putting spooks ashore, 'stealing' torpedoes/missle test shots. Even got to see a few of the spook reports. Pretty incredible stuff.
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Navy Blue? That's the name for super urgent messages to/from the Navy. I can't remember if Navy Blue or Navy Gold is higher. Fly Navy
Link Posted: 7/3/2003 7:57:52 PM EDT
Damned Bubbleheads.
Link Posted: 7/3/2003 8:16:16 PM EDT
I was on a 688 class sub for four years. I am glad to be out, I had a Navigation officer that was a major ASSwipe.
Link Posted: 7/3/2003 8:59:07 PM EDT
On the other side of the cold war stories: My uncle spent over a decade in the SOVIET navy.. He's told some pretty crazy stories over the years. Soviet subs got just about as far into American harbors as Americans, BTW [:)]
Link Posted: 7/3/2003 9:43:58 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Andreuha: On the other side of the cold war stories: My uncle spent over a decade in the SOVIET navy.. He's told some pretty crazy stories over the years. Soviet subs got just about as far into American harbors as Americans, BTW [:)]
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I always wonder about the Soviet side of things. We used to send soooo many flights near or in their airspace, many were shot down. I always wonder if the same happened here. By the way, about getting in our harbors, this may sound insulting, but it is in no way meant to be: Are you sure? I know that Soviet subs could NEVER match the US subs quietness. Though a diesel on batteries is damn quiet. Fly Navy
Link Posted: 7/3/2003 10:17:52 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Fly-Navy: I always wonder about the Soviet side of things. We used to send soooo many flights near or in their airspace, many were shot down. I always wonder if the same happened here. By the way, about getting in our harbors, this may sound insulting, but it is in no way meant to be: Are you sure? I know that Soviet subs could NEVER match the US subs quietness. Though a diesel on batteries is damn quiet. Fly Navy
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Well, The only thing I know about the flights is that they did many fly-by's on some of the ships my dad served on ('merchant' vessels [;)]... Actually, my grandma DIDNT OK him to stay and live here while he was on one, shes still kicking herself for it as we came here later anyway, and at less advantage). As for the subs, Soviet subs werent known for their stealth until the engineers finally bothered fixing that (LATE cold war era). My uncle served until I belive mid 70's, so he probably didnt get to scrape his periscope against any american ships. the first Soviet Nuclear subs only entered service in the mid-late 70's. He was offered a Nuclear sub (He was a full.Admiral), but refused(left the navy actually, as my cousin had been born and the whole 'wife+kids=less suicidal stunts' equation came into play)
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