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Posted: 6/28/2003 10:06:09 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 6/29/2003 11:34:08 AM EDT by doorgunner84]
I want one... Two guys in my shop just got theirs this summer and I've been wanting one for a while now. I really don't know that much about them though. I like the looks of the Night Train, Duece, and the Dyna Low Rider. Can anybody tell me about this bikes? I've been to the shop in town but they don't have all the bikes there to try on.... DG84
Link Posted: 6/28/2003 10:50:21 PM EDT
Link Posted: 6/28/2003 11:09:35 PM EDT
Ask around among your H-D owning buddies to determine which shop(s) have the most knowledgeable and friendly sales staff. Then visit those shops and talk to the sales people ... they're all trained on all aspects of each model. They should be able to tell you how each of these models "ride". This is their job - to help you decide for yourself which model(s) are the best candidates for you to purchase. But you should go in to the dealership prepared to answer questions about what kind of riding you intend to do (touring, cruising, weekend blasts, etc. or some combination thereof). What features do you think are going to be most important to you for your intended use(s)? Keep in mind that there are tons of aftermarket options you can get to make your ride exactly as you want; so you don't have to hit the bullseye with a production bike. You name the part (e.g., seat, controls, engine components, etc.) and their will be multiple options to select from in the aftermarket, no matter what part you select. A bike may start off life as an FXSTF from the factory, but may be transformed into something that you wouldn't recognize as such after being customized by the owner. If you've already been through this exercise and just want to see the Night Train, Deuce, etc. in person ... then you might have to drive to other dealerships (call first to be sure they have one on the floor that they'll allow you sit on). The end of the 2003 model year is drawing to a close ... the 2004 models should begin arriving in showrooms in August (the dealers already know, or soon will, what new models / colors will be available - although they won't disclose to the public until the new sales brochures are distributed). So, you might want to be patient for another 6 - 8 weeks and you'll be able to see the new stuff. Ask the sales people what's new ... what's different ... and why. They will usually be a good source of comprehensive information. But if you feel they're not responsive to you (some H-D dealerships still have an "attitude") leave and go to another shop who will treat you the way you want to be treated. Good luck!
Link Posted: 6/29/2003 11:32:38 AM EDT
Thanks for the help.....
Link Posted: 6/29/2003 6:02:40 PM EDT
[url]www.hawgeye.com[/url] Rates local dealers & stealers. Taken an MSF course yet? Ever ridden before? What kind of riding to you intend to do, and just what kind of riding CAN you do in AK?
Link Posted: 6/30/2003 9:30:23 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 6/30/2003 9:37:33 AM EDT by Hipower]
Originally Posted By doorgunner84: I want one... Two guys in my shop just got theirs this summer and I've been wanting one for a while now. I really don't know that much about them though. I like the looks of the Night Train, Duece, and the Dyna Low Rider. Can anybody tell me about this bikes? I've been to the shop in town but they don't have all the bikes there to try on.... DG84
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Ok my advice is to think about how and when you'll get to ride. Are you going to use the bike as primary transportation, or a recreational vehicle? Are you going to ride it to your favorite watering hole to make a big arrival, or will you take more long rides over several days at a time? Even more so than with cars, how you are going to use a bike needs careful consideration. If you're like most of us, you want to be able to do a lot of different stuff. The bikes you mentioned cover 2 of the 3 Big twin frame types HD builds (Softail, Dyna, and Touring). We'll rule touring out since you didn't mention a Road King or ElectaGlide as you favorites. Now the Softails (Night Train, Duece, Fat Boy, Standard, Heritage, etc) have a counterbalanced twin cam 88CI engine mounted directly to the frame. This translates to more felt vibration than you get with a Dyna, though with the counterbalanced motor, the comfort delta has been narrowed considerably. Having ridden the new TC88 in a hardmount, I would consider either, whereas in '96 I went with the Wide Glide over the Softail Custom since it rode so much better. The easy identification of Softails is the lack of frame mounted shocks. Softails rear frame section will consist of a triangular swing arm with shocks mounted underneath giving that clean hardtail frame look, yet with all the benefits of a sprung frame. You can identify Dyna's (also Tourers and Sporty's) by the presence of shocks at the rear of the bike supporting the frame from the swing arm. (They'll be covered up by saddle bags on the touring models.) The frame also features a rubber mounted engine that cuts down on felt vibration. Again the difference is less pronouced than it once was. The Lowrider, Wide Glide, Superglide and variants there-of make up the Dyna line. I put over 40K on my 1996 Dyna Wide Glide and have only good things to say about it. I wish I could have kept it and bought a new one, but I can only afford one bike at a time (for me). Since my wife has decided to give up her Sporty and go back to 2 upping I opted to trade for an Electa Glide this year. Loving it, but do miss the ol' 'glide some times. Now if the bikes you mentioned are the styles you tend to like, I'd add two more for consideration. Those being the Softail Standard and the Wide Glide. The Standard is the same frame as the Night Train and the Wide Glide is the same frame as the Lowrider but with a wide set of forks, plus forward controls where the Lowrider has narrow forks and standard controls with added highway pegs. Of the bikes you mentioned the Lowrider is the most versatile, but IMHO it is also the least sexy as a "bar bike". It does make a really decent traveling steed. You can add lots of different types of saddle bags, windshields and other stuff to make it a pretty good bike for long rides, yet still strip it down for around town cruising. That said, it won't be as sexy as your other two choices even stipped down. Think about how you're most likely to really use the bike then surf around a bit and visit some local dealers. Good Luck!
Link Posted: 6/30/2003 9:48:00 AM EDT
Originally Posted By doorgunner84: I want one... Two guys in my shop just got theirs this summer and I've been wanting one for a while now. I really don't know that much about them though. I like the looks of the Night Train, Duece, and the Dyna Low Rider. Can anybody tell me about this bikes? I've been to the shop in town but they don't have all the bikes there to try on.... DG84
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I've been riding Harleys for 25 years. Buy a Road King and you will never regret it. Especially when you do go on those long rides and everyone does eventually. --RR
Link Posted: 6/30/2003 9:51:49 AM EDT
buy a used one. Two types of riders are the ones tht have dropped a bike already and the ones that are going to. A mind 80's bike is plenty reliable and has enough power to get you in trouble without spendin 20k+. Cruizer
Link Posted: 6/30/2003 10:28:04 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 6/30/2003 10:28:47 AM EDT by dbshabo]
Try an make it down to Daytona for Bike Week or Biketoberfest. You can ride every Harley model and make up your mind about each. I'll cast my vote for the Road King as well. For a Harley, an enjoyable ride. I rode the Deuce last Bike Week, it was tolerable. Look at the Honda VTX if you're looking for a big V-twin. 1800cc motor (larger than any stock Harley made) and superb craftmanship thru out. Plus you'll have about $7,000 left in your pocket after the purchase. That'll buy a lot of gas, beer, ammo, or whatever. Shabo
Link Posted: 6/30/2003 10:37:48 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 6/30/2003 10:51:33 AM EDT by Zoomer]
I've been riding Harleys for 25 years. Buy a Road King
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..I bought a heritage in 92.Traded in my 74 sportster.My thoughts were,buy something that I'll like when I'm 65 yrs. old. I don't plain on buying another one in my life time. I vote for the big road bikes but thats just me. If you want a Saturday night look good bike, go with a sport model.(IMHO)Edit to ad[url]http://www.cycletrader.com/[/url]Here you go,I spent many days looking.
Link Posted: 6/30/2003 10:38:12 AM EDT
Do you have your MC lic yet. If not get it and find someplace that rents what you are looking at get it for the week end and ride. This may take a couple of week ends. http://www.streethogs.com/
Link Posted: 6/30/2003 11:16:21 AM EDT
I vote Road King as well. That said, phuck the Softail. They handle like shit and are overly heavy because of the rear suspension. They attempt to appear as a rigid, but have a suspension & fail miserably ay both. Dyna is where it's at in the non-touring class. The rear suspension is good & the weight is lower than the other classes. I have an older FLH that is great for touring, a Road King for anything, an Indian Scout (comparable to the dyna's) for almost anything and a Sportster for zipping. My opinion is that forward controls are neat for a short cruise, but a pain for the long run. If I had only one bike, I'd go with the mid controls & highway pegs unless it's a Sporty. If it's a Sporty & you are over 14 years old or are a woman you will be cramped. If it were mine to do, I'd look for a good used FXR. Rubber mounted engine and tranny. Mid controls. Narrow glide. Light & nimble (like the sporty). Big twin. Accesories galore. If you are gpoing new, Dyna Superglide T-sport would give you a bunch of possibilities. Look at the Indian line as well just to different than your buddies. They are very compirable to the HD line, but seem to be built a bit stronger. All the controls are billit, S&S carb, etc...
Link Posted: 6/30/2003 11:35:14 AM EDT
Real men ride a "ROADOG" [:D] [img]http://www.roadog.com/buzznroadog.jpg[/img]
Link Posted: 6/30/2003 11:36:02 AM EDT
What is the difference in a Harley Davidson and a Hoover vacum cleaner? The location of the dirtbag. :)
Link Posted: 7/2/2003 8:42:56 PM EDT
Hipower summed a lot up. Nicely done! apologies to all - having troubles seeing all screens today w/o waiting 1/2 hour. Softails: Advantages - lots of accessories. Disadvantages - for those of us raised on dual shock (conventional swingarm) rides, it feels like you're riding a rubberband. FXR/FXD/DYNA series. ADV-Smallest of the "big" twins (i.e. non-sportster) hogs. Good power-to-weight ratio (Most HD custom drag bikes are dyna derivatives). Rubber mount engines+ less vibe. DIS- Smallest of the "big" twins (i.e. non-sportster) hogs. Tougher to haul "2-up" for long (i.e. luggaged) trips. I bought my Superglide (FXR) used, with goals of solo touring. With wife who loves to ride, next bike will probably be a Road King with removable windshield and leather bags. Got MSF?
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