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Posted: 6/27/2003 8:49:42 AM EDT
Yesterday my wife gave the dogs some roast chicken leftovers. They was a bit greasy and ain't sitting well with one of them. Didn't sleep much last night, had to walk him about every 2 hours. Poor guy didn't seem to enjoy it much either. Anyway, the dog is still running like a faucet every 3 hours. I know somethings humans can eat (like chocolate) are toxic to dogs. Is Pepto safe or even advisable? Any other alternatives?
Link Posted: 6/27/2003 9:03:57 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 6/27/2003 9:27:19 AM EDT by Hawkeye]
Link Posted: 6/27/2003 9:11:26 AM EDT
Originally Posted By Hawkeye: Yes, pepto is safe. You didnt feed him the chicken bones did you? Contrary to some opinion, chicken bones, and to a lesser extent, pork bones, are NOT good for dogs. Chicken bones will splinter and can puncture the intestines and cause internal bleeding.
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Knew about chicken bones.
Link Posted: 6/27/2003 9:12:28 AM EDT
As Hawkeye said, if you are unsure if he ate the bones, feed him as much bread as he'll eat. This will help 'cushion' any bone particles and help soak up some of that grease. Just don't let him run around too much afterwards. As for the pepto, not sure and wife is busy at work. I'll try to find out when she gets home. So, go ahead and start feeding him white bread, just keep giving it until he doesnt want anymore.
Link Posted: 6/27/2003 9:17:51 AM EDT
[b]You didnt feed him the [i]cooked[/i] chicken bones did you? Contrary to some opinion, [i]cooked[/i] chicken bones, and to a lesser extent, pork bones, are NOT good for dogs. [i]Cooked[/i] [c]hicken bones will splinter and can puncture the intestines and cause internal bleeding.[/b]
Link Posted: 6/27/2003 9:26:14 AM EDT
Link Posted: 6/27/2003 9:40:58 AM EDT
I use pepto on my goats and my wolf.. I too am guilty of feeding chicken bones.. only the big bones though.
Link Posted: 6/27/2003 9:47:26 AM EDT
Just to clarify, he got no chicken bones of any kind. I'm positive. I already knew about the dangers of chicken bones. Just a older dog who doesn't handle chicken grease very well. It kinda ran through his system.
Link Posted: 6/27/2003 10:04:55 AM EDT
Okay Steyr, the resident Vet Tech just got home - heres what she says, No to the Pepto - it has asprin in it. Kayopectate (sp?) is okay, but call the vet and find out what dose with regards to the weight. Too much will poison him, so you need to check. The bread will probably work on containing some of that upset stomach, but as you stated, no bones, so dont run out and get another loaf of bread [:)]
Link Posted: 6/27/2003 10:21:47 AM EDT
Crap, what will the asprin do? I just gave him some bread with Pepto.
Link Posted: 6/27/2003 10:26:46 AM EDT
My vet tells me the best thing for this is Immodium AD. Give about 1.5 times the dose you would to a human of similar weight. I give my MASTIFF (185#) 3 pills at the first sign of distress, and usually that takes care of it. Asprin is OK for dogs too. My mastiff is well aged, minor arthritis in his hips, gets 2 asprin (unbuffered 325mg asprin) in the morning and night. Has been taking it for well over a year without any detrimental effects. Ibuprofen is a no-no. Their livers can not metabolize it and they quickly sustain liver and kidney damage. However, for upset stomach, the runs, and similar symptoms, hit him with Immodium AD. Geoff
Link Posted: 6/27/2003 10:27:47 AM EDT
Just got off the phone with the vet. He's gonna be fine.
Link Posted: 6/27/2003 10:31:50 AM EDT
Dogs and aspirin [url]http://www.vetinfo.com/daspirin.html[/url]
Link Posted: 6/27/2003 10:46:22 AM EDT
HKgnnr, Check the bottle on kayopectate. They just changed the formula and it now carries a warning on Reyes syndrome. In fact, it contains the exact same active ingredient as Pepto. I'm just curious if this is a concern or if it's the salicylic acid listed on the pepto. I'm surprised on the no aspirin for dogs. Can she clarify? I knew aspirin was dangerous for cat and irritating to the stomach lining of dogs. In fact, I know dogs on aspirin therapy for joint problems. Thanks Hawkeye, By chance is your vet any of these? Dr. Ian Billinghurst B.V.Sc. Veterinary Surgeon says, "Sixty to eighty percent of a dog's diet should be raw meaty bones." Dr. Tom Lonsdale B. Vet. Med. MRCVS Veterinary Surgeon says, "Raw meaty bones, chicken wings, whole fish, rabbit or similar should form the bulk of the diet." Dr. Richard Pitcairn DVM says, "There is no better natural cleaner for teeth." Dr, Jean Dodds ....
Link Posted: 6/27/2003 11:05:00 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 6/27/2003 11:09:40 AM EDT by Boomholzer]
Im not a vet and my amatuer opinion will differ............so take it any way you want. I have given my labs pepto. Pepto should not be a problem with dogs, the only active ingredient is: Bismuth Subsalicylate (sp?). rileyindy: Aspirin is acetylsalicylic acid. Pepto has Salicylic Acid. I do not see the connection to aspirin as its not the same. Aug, pepto is OK for Steyr puppy. FYI: Salicylic Acid is the active ingrediant in ACNE PADS (like Stridex). :P
Link Posted: 6/27/2003 12:23:27 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 6/27/2003 12:26:11 PM EDT by magnum_99]
Originally Posted By rileyindy: Hawkeye, By chance is your vet any of these? Dr. Ian Billinghurst B.V.Sc. Veterinary Surgeon says, "Sixty to eighty percent of a dog's diet should be raw meaty bones." Dr. Tom Lonsdale B. Vet. Med. MRCVS Veterinary Surgeon says, "Raw meaty bones, chicken wings, whole fish, rabbit or similar should form the bulk of the diet." Dr. Richard Pitcairn DVM says, "There is no better natural cleaner for teeth." Dr, Jean Dodds ....
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WTF do you think a dog would eat in the wild? Milkbones? Gravy Train? Kibbles and Bits? Processed dog food is merely a convenience for lazy dog owners. Until about 50 years ago, there was no such thing as "pet food" for dogs. You just gave them table scraps, or, guess what, raw meaty bones. Dogs are adapted to eating meaty bones, partially digested stomach contents, and just about anything else that has nutritional value to include plant matter. They are also set up to binge in times of plenty and to go for quite a while without food when scarce, just like any other wild carnivore. I feed my dog raw meaty turtey legs, chicken wings and legs (breasts are too expensive), beef bones with meat on them, lamb sometimes, and a concoction of vegetables, hamburger, and other scraps that approximate stomach contents. I rotate this on a daily basis so he gets a variety. Even dogs get bored with the same ole same ole.
Link Posted: 6/27/2003 12:35:47 PM EDT
I agree with Mag_99 HOWEVER, IF YOU HAVE EVER HAD A 85 POUND INDOOR/OUTDOOR DOG "[b]LOSE IT[/b]" ACROSS THE WALLS AND FLOOR, YOU WILL LEARN TO BE CONSCIENCE OF IT'S DIET!
Link Posted: 6/27/2003 12:36:22 PM EDT
My vet tells me the best thing for this is Immodium AD.
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Good, because I've given that to my neighbor's Great Dane a couple of times. We didn't know if it was safe or not, but we were desperate. Half a pill worked well each time. Aside: this dog take so much medicine the owner has it trained to take pills. You lay it down on a hard floor, tell him to "take your pill," and he'll like the pill and swallow it!z
Link Posted: 6/27/2003 12:54:29 PM EDT
Ha ha ha! The thought of all those fox and wolves slinkin off in the woods to die slow painful deaths after raiding a henhouse make me laugh. Hee Hee! WHAT were they thinkin?
Link Posted: 6/27/2003 1:11:22 PM EDT
Originally Posted By magnum_99: Processed dog food is merely a convenience for lazy dog owners.
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Uhh, not entirely true. It also keeps them "regular", as previously mentioned. Those of us who work with dogs on a daily basis can appreciate that fact. However, I do feed my non-working dogs a varied diet, based upon cheap processed food supplemented with real food. Steyr, personally, I wouldnt give any of my dogs Pepto, unless the shits were causing a concern for the dogs health. (Dehydration, projectile shitting, etc.) The last thing you want is a stopped up dog, and be required to manually 'loosen" the stool. No fun. No fun indeed.
Link Posted: 6/27/2003 1:52:35 PM EDT
Feed him a can of cooked pumpkin. Settles a dog's tummy. No drugs. All organic.
Link Posted: 6/27/2003 2:13:44 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Hannah_Reitsch: Feed him a can of cooked pumpkin. Settles a dog's tummy. No drugs. All organic.
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I'll vouch for this. Just make sure it's the canned pumpkin and not the pumpkin pie filling.
Link Posted: 6/27/2003 2:19:10 PM EDT
magnum_99, Don't understand why that was directed at me. I was agreeing with you -- or you were agreeing with me. Guess I better take some Midol.
Link Posted: 6/27/2003 2:34:38 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Boomholzer: I agree with Mag_99 HOWEVER, IF YOU HAVE EVER HAD A 85 POUND INDOOR/OUTDOOR DOG "[b]LOSE IT[/b]" ACROSS THE WALLS AND FLOOR, YOU WILL LEARN TO BE CONSCIENCE OF IT'S DIET!
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Once my 185# mastiff got into some snail poison the neighbors left out, and literally sprayed the walls black. That was a nasty couple of days. Geoff
Link Posted: 6/27/2003 2:44:15 PM EDT
well, there are lots of ways to treat uncomplicated diarrhea.. first, make sure your pet is not dehydrated - if so, that might necessitate a trip to the vet's....as well as unrelenting diarrhea... but for home treatment this is what i suggest... withold food for 24 - 48 hours - can have water as long as he is not vomiting pepto is fine - about 1 ml/10 lbs up to three times a day.. i would only use Immodium for severe diarrhea...if your pet has is real bad - go to the vet please - additional medication may be needed... then, when ready to get back to eating, feed small amounts of a highly digestible low-fat diet for several days...like boiled chicken and rice the controversy over feeing raw bones/meats is one that is hotly contested in the veterinary community. I do not like a diet solely based on processed dos foods - there are some out there that are alot better than others, but i would encourage top dressing your dog food with some veggies (carrots, broccoli), hard-bolied eggs, cottage cheese, yogurt, and meats - i always recommend that people cook the meat because of the human health risk - kinda have to tell them that... as far as bones - i understand what you are saying magnum, but some breeds do not have the dentition that would enable them to adequately mascerate those "natural" food stuffs - you should always exercise caution when feeding bones..again, i always have to recommend that you don't...seen too many problems with it... but with any diet - GO SLOW when introducing something new - animals can have food sensitivity/allergies just like us...
Link Posted: 6/27/2003 2:59:53 PM EDT
My lab thinks Tum's are candy.
Link Posted: 6/27/2003 5:54:41 PM EDT
Pupto Bismil is the answer,now what was the question? Bob [:D]
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