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Posted: 6/23/2003 6:25:55 PM EDT
I'm probably moving to Va Beach next summer, it's not final but it's starting to look that way. Anyway if I do I'm going to buy a boat, I've come down to a Sea Hunt 186 center consol. The boat is 18.5 feet with a Yamaha 115 four stroke, kinda an entry level offshore boat. Money and the fact my truck will not pull much more has had a great deal to do with my choice. I understand that I will have to pick my day's to go offshore, that's not the question. Do any of ya'll own a Sea Hunt and if so are they good boat's, after all my research it seems like a lot of boat for the money. Thank's Pluckmaster
Link Posted: 6/23/2003 6:49:47 PM EDT
I don't know a thing about that brand of boat, a lot of boat manufacturer's are regional in market, especially fishing boats. I do know the Yamaha 115's however, they are very good motors. You may want to also look at a kicker motor, for trolling and get "Get home" insurance. A dual battery setup is a plus too. You are right in assuming 18 feet is a little small for offshore, My Bayliner is 21 ft and it get's a little bouncy and wet at times. Nothing you can't handle as long as you pay attention to the weather. One thing, Get a GOOD VHF radio and antenna setup, and a solid set of survival gear for everyone on the boat.
Link Posted: 6/23/2003 7:40:40 PM EDT
A good GPS can be a real lifesaver.
Link Posted: 6/24/2003 2:49:34 AM EDT
I've been fishing offshore Hatteras for many years. A 24 footer is the smallest boat I would want to be in out there in the blue water as most of the time it's rough as hell.
Link Posted: 6/24/2003 2:59:37 AM EDT
No offense but a 18.5 footer is NOT an 'offshore' boat. You can "pick your days" but you're talking about the Atlantic Ocean and she has no mercy. Good luck.
Link Posted: 6/24/2003 3:08:37 AM EDT
Originally Posted By osprey21: No offense but a 18.5 footer is NOT an 'offshore' boat. You can "pick your days" but you're talking about the Atlantic Ocean and she has no mercy. Good luck.
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AMEN And to repeat ITS NOT A OFFSHORE BOAT. Start at about 22 minimum deep"V" Not to be a smart asz but BASS boats are 18'.
Link Posted: 6/24/2003 3:16:51 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 6/24/2003 3:19:15 AM EDT by TomJefferson]
Link Posted: 6/24/2003 3:43:57 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 6/24/2003 3:46:56 AM EDT by propguy]
Originally Posted By TomJefferson: The Sea Hunt is a fine boat for what it is designed for which is a coastal runner and bay runner. She'll take water over the bow fine but would not recommend offshore. The break water can be pretty rough in a small boat. A thing alot of boaters don't realize is if you go out real early typically the break water will be at it's calmest point. Coming back in will be much rougher and many newbies get out and can't get back in. A GPS is nice but for coastal running a compass will typically find you shore. In a small boat, it is much more important to have a weather radio so you can keep track of fronts and wave heights. A boats speed is greatly influenced by waves. Stay close to shore till you get to know what you boat can handle as compared to the weather radio. Hearing it on the radio and being in it can be two entirely different things. In my 10 years on the Gulf, I would not even go out with a front approaching. The Ocean is Gods way of telling us just how insignificant we really are. It's force is greater than anything man has ever created. One time, I went out in a 40' flying bridge and got caught in a tropical depression with 25' waves. It was nothing like the movies. There was no pattern, up, side, side, down, up side,down, down, etc. You can't stand up and you can't set down just hang on and flap like a flag in the wind. Sometimes we would crest a wave and drop the 25'. I though the hull would crack with the jar. Other times, we would go into a trough and the walls would just crash from all sides on the boat. We would bob back to the surface. I would have be scared to death but to tell you the truth I was so sick I wanted to die and I spend about 30 days a year on a boat. I'm not trying to scare you but hopefully give you a little respect for the mother of all life is not to be messed with. Tj
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Ya know TJ that story brought back so many memories some great some not so good WHEN THE FORECASTERS SAY 2-3 or 3-4' ITS NOT LIKE LOOKING AT A TAPE MEASURE AND SAYIN AHHH THATS NOT TO BAD.[shock] itS WHOLE DIFFERENT 2-3'OR 3-4' PG Edited to add being a little scared of the OCEAN is kinda good you could also say a whole lot of respect is DUE.
Link Posted: 6/24/2003 4:31:00 AM EDT
Dont listed to these guys trying to talk you out of fishing in the ocean in a 18.5' boat. I spent this weekend in a 22' hydroSport ....that had to be towed from 10 miles out. And, then, a 19'. I was off shore at Holden Beach NC The ocean was pure glass Sat and sun. However...the waters up past Hatterass may be rougher.... I'd follow the advice about having solid equipment. And, fofr $100 a year you can be a member of Sea Tow. They will come and get ya if something goes wrong....no extra charges. If you have to call in for a tow without being a member, it may take hours and cost $500 or more. Get to know someone(or spend the $ to charter a boat) and have them show you the ins and outs. -HS
Link Posted: 6/24/2003 4:35:34 AM EDT
Originally Posted By HillBillySasquatch: Dont listed to these guys trying to talk you out of fishing in the ocean in a 18.5' boat. [b][red]I spent this weekend in a 22' hydroSport[/red][/b] ....that had to be towed from 10 miles out. And, then, a 19'. I was off shore at Holden Beach NC The ocean was pure glass Sat and sun. However...the waters up past Hatterass may be rougher.... I'd follow the advice about having solid equipment. And, fofr $100 a year you can be a member of Sea Tow. They will come and get ya if something goes wrong....no extra charges. If you have to call in for a tow without being a member, it may take hours and cost $500 or more. Get to know someone(or spend the $ to charter a boat) and have them show you the ins and outs. -HS
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[:)]
Link Posted: 6/24/2003 4:43:15 AM EDT
I will add the cost difference between the boats is fairly small look for something thats a year or 2 old STILL UNDER WARRANTY in a 22' its a huge difference in ability to go out or stay home .
Link Posted: 6/24/2003 4:54:04 AM EDT
I have not fished in the Atlantic, but have fished a lot in the Gulf of Mexico. It could be a lot different. I have gone out many times in a small boat, sometimes 50 plus miles. Its one thing to go a few miles offshore, but I would not go further than that in a small boat without a friend in a second boat nearby. And, the weather needs to be very good. You can make good speed in a small craft when the weather is nice, but when/if you detect even a slight weather problem, you need to head home. A radio and a good compass are essential. The other comments are right ... the ocean is pretty merciless.
Link Posted: 6/24/2003 5:50:18 AM EDT
I'm no expert, but: In big water, dual engines can save your butt. If you get an aluminum hull, welded is better thant riveted, especially for rough water. There is GPS, and Marine GPS. Know what you need. Don't forget the compass and chart. But also know how to read the chart AND all the content. By the way, the U.S. Power Squadron used to have great classes on operating and navigating boats. Highly recommended. You better have a 2-way marine radio. Check with the Coast Guard on what equipment is required. IMHO, you are approaching your boat requirement this backwards (what truck will pull>>>your size limit). Maybe better would be: what ocean requires>>>>can I get this or not? Also keep in mind the possibility that with the demostration of your ability (perhaps Power Squadron ticket), you may be able to rent a proper sized boat to take out and not have all the maintenance, payments, insurance, etc.
Link Posted: 6/24/2003 5:52:11 AM EDT
Originally Posted By prk: I'm no expert, but: In big water, dual engines can save your butt. If you get an aluminum hull, I think welded is better than riveted, especially for rough water, if both are high-qualtiy. There is GPS, and Marine GPS. Know what you need. Don't forget the compass and chart. But also know how to read the chart AND all the content. By the way, the U.S. Power Squadron used to have great classes on operating and navigating boats. Highly recommended. You better have a 2-way marine radio. Check with the Coast Guard on what equipment is required. IMHO, you are approaching your boat requirement this backwards (what truck will pull>>>your size limit). Maybe better would be: what ocean requires>>>>can I get this or not? Also keep in mind the possibility that with the demostration of your ability (perhaps Power Squadron ticket), you may be able to rent a proper sized boat to take out and not have all the maintenance, payments, insurance, etc.
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Link Posted: 6/24/2003 5:58:20 AM EDT
Dude, 24 ft and twin engines are the only way to go offshore. It ain;t the smooth water that kills you dead. Its the sudden squall and the front that pops up and catches you out becuase you tried to stay at the fishin hole an hour too long. Get the bigger boat.
Link Posted: 6/24/2003 6:17:52 AM EDT
I live in Newport News which is like 20 minutes from the oceanfront at Virginia Beach. An 18 foot boat with one engine is good for the Bay, but you don't want to go offshore around here in a 18' single. Don't get me wrong you can certainly cruise up and down the Va. Bch. oceanfront within sight of shore, but you don't want to go offshore fishing in that boat. Also I think I'd wait till I got here to get the boat. Several reasons. It's one more thing to move. Do they service them here? Warranty work? I have a buddy who has a 27' footer with a single Merc Optimax. When you get 40 MILES offshore that boat is REALLY small. He's got a great radio and GPS etc all the latest color radar, color fishfinder and he's an experienced boater. He grew up around here, been on the water his whole life, KNOWS these waters. I still get weird out there. He's looking at a 39 footer with 2 inboards.
Link Posted: 6/24/2003 6:33:43 AM EDT
Link Posted: 6/24/2003 6:34:09 AM EDT
[img]http://photos.ar15.com/ImageGallery/Attachments/DownloadAttach.asp?iImageUnq=14063[/img]
Link Posted: 6/24/2003 10:18:05 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 6/24/2003 12:48:47 PM EDT by rogerdodger]
Pluck, hows it goin I currently have a 21' Mako and love it. I have always had center console boats. As long as ur aware of the weather conditions u can go anywhere. I have been on Sea Hunts before and they are ok. I prefer more established brands honestly. The best 18' center consoles on the market are the Boston Whaler Outrage or the Edgewater, but they are pricey. If i were u i would check out Century, Cobia, Wellcraft, Proline, or Aquasport If u want a great boat (the best i owned} was an 18' Nautico center console catamaran, Cats can handle much worse conditions than V hulls definately take a safety boating class ciao
Link Posted: 6/24/2003 1:23:17 PM EDT
When I did lots of work with the USCG I really grew to like the Boston Whaler boats. I plucked many fishermen off other craft, but thought the Whaler was a very solid, well built craft. Its a bit more expensive than some others out there, but its money well spent. Don't compromise on the boat because of $$. Wait another year or 2 then get a better boat.
Link Posted: 6/24/2003 6:15:13 PM EDT
When I said off shore I was thinking of the tower/reef, I believe that the light tower is about 12 miles off shore. I'm not thinking off taking the boat out 30 miles, just the CBBT and maybe the tower on a good day. My truck is a 3.7 liter V6 dodge, so I'm limited as to what I can tow. Also this is about my limit financially. Thanks for everyones input. Simon
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