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Posted: 6/18/2003 9:33:19 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 6/18/2003 9:34:30 PM EDT by prk]
So with all the pressure changes, is there any danger of damage to the fillings from very small bits of air underneath?? Or is it always about 1 atmosphere inside?
Link Posted: 6/18/2003 9:34:45 PM EDT
Isn't the pressure within the submarine itself regulated?
Link Posted: 6/18/2003 10:04:39 PM EDT
I want to make a seamen joke, but Im too tired.
Link Posted: 6/18/2003 10:24:04 PM EDT
Originally Posted By prk: So with all the pressure changes, is there any danger of damage to the fillings from very small bits of air underneath?? Or is it always about 1 atmosphere inside?
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It would make sense that the pressure is regulated, since regulating the pressure makes max depth a function of hull integrity, not 'how far down can we go before the internal pressure gets too high'...
Link Posted: 6/18/2003 10:30:04 PM EDT
It is pretty closely regulated, but you get a sudden increase in air pressure when they launch a torpedo or a slug of water as practice. Not enough of a change to hurt fillings, but your ears take a hit due to the sudden increase.
Link Posted: 6/18/2003 10:32:43 PM EDT
I don't know alot, but I know that air pressure changes as the sub changes depth. I knew a guy who was discharged from the service when they found out his ears wouldn't "pop" or adjust to air pressure.
Link Posted: 6/18/2003 10:45:50 PM EDT
Hey with a submariner whats another hole in the head more or less?
Link Posted: 6/19/2003 3:28:16 AM EDT
Well, it's kinda regulated. Just as long as you can come up to periscope depth once a day and equalize, it's usually around 29"Hg. But before you dive you normally "take a pressure on the ship(30-31"Hg)." This way if you have to charge the air banks(located outside the pressure hull), it will end up between 28-29"Hg. But, occasionally you don't have the opportunity to go up to periscope depth and equalize. And, if you are using a lot of air, you can end up around 26"Hg. When you do equalize, though, it happens over the course of a couple of minutes, so it doesn't really bother you that bad. It definately doesn't bother your fillings.
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