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Posted: 6/15/2003 7:04:58 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 6/15/2003 7:14:57 AM EDT by liberty86]
A "Different Political Correctness"??? An e-mail I recieved. There was a time when I would have laughed about it.
Think about the UnConstitutional Patriot Act I and II. Think about the anti-terrorism laws that trash our Bill of Rights and of the judges that uphold the UnConstitutional laws "anti-terrorism" laws. Think about the SO-CALLED War on Drugs. Think about how Americans are under attack by their own government via these anti-terrorism laws.Think about TV and Radio constantly trying to indoctrinate you via public messages on Politically Correct thinking ie: "Tolerance", "Correct Diversity views" etc. Think about the Liberal Nazis' attack on tobacco and smokers and the manner in which the lawmaking Nazis have created laws to protect you from yourself - and have thus, taken away your freedom of choice and freedom to make your own mistakes in life and learn from them. Think about how America is rapidly becoming like the old oppressive and tyrannical U.S.S.R. of the Cold War era. Les ----- Original Message ----- From: "spiker" <> To: Sent: Saturday, June 14, 2003 10:06 PM Subject: Fw: Arsenal Uncovered: Suspect Linked to Extremist Movement Arsenal Uncovered Suspect Linked to Extremist Movement by Winston Smith ------------------------------------------------- Los Angeles - A joint task force of federal agents and state police raided the home of a Santa Monica man Saturday, uncovering an arsenal of illegal books and other media. "It's astounding," said Police Chief John Lynch at a press conference Tuesday. "I've never seen so many books in my life. It was a virtual library." Chief Lynch described a entire room filled wall to wall with books and magazines. In one room officers discovered a computer, printer and thousands of pages of printing paper. The discovery of the computer-printer setup prompted evacuation of the neighborhood while EOD teams rendered the device inactive. Officers and federal agents stood in front of stacks of seized books and magazines at Tuesday's press conference. A leather bound 1400 page copy of War and Peace was the centerpiece of the exhibit. Among the books on display were military field manuals and books on military history. "These military-style books are instruments of war, plain and simple," said Special Agent Gregory Kahn. "They have no recreational purpose. "[red]They have no legitimate civilian use.[/red]" "We're still counting them - we have no idea how many books we're dealing with," said Detective-Sergeant Gary Knowles, another member of the task force. "I'm just glad we got them off the street. Nobody needs that many books. It's scary the kind of stuff people have in their homes." On Monday, agents wearing space-age HAZMAT suits were still removing books from the house. Asked what would become of the contraband, Agent Kahn stated that it would be destroyed in a specially built incinerator. The suspect, 43 year old John Benjamin, is being held without bail pending charges. His arraignment is scheduled for next month. Neighbors and co-workers described a quiet, polite man. "I'd never suspect him of something like this," said community resident Charles Lamb. "He was always so nice. This is a complete shock." Sources close to the investigation tell the Times that Benjamin has been linked to the controversial National Reading Association, an extremist group which encourages private possession of literature. The ACLU believes that the First Amendment of the U.S. Constitution guarantees the right to read and print literature. The Times was unable to obtain a copy of the Constitution for this article, but is submitting a Freedom of Information Act request to access the document. Terrorism expert and author Brian Simmons told the Times that groups such as the ACLU are magnets for disturbed individuals like Benjamin. "This interpretation of the Constitution is very common among the political fringes," said Mr. Simmons. "But history just isn't on their side. The First Amendment was intended to protect the right of major newspapers and libraries. It's absurd to think that they [the framers] would have wanted private possession of word processing software and home printers." Book collectors like Benjamin, Simmons said, suffer from a deep rooted psychological neurosis which drives them to stockpile books. "Who needs this many books? He couldn't possibly read them all. People like Mr. Benjamin do it because they feel inadequate. Reading makes them feel smarter, and publishing their thoughts makes them feel important." Raids of this type have sparked a nationwide debate over the millions unregistered books possessed illegally in the U.S. Under U.S. law, only deactivated and replica books are available to the general public, though in some places they are legal for retired librarians and journalists. Until last year, books printed before 1986 could still be legally possessed by someone willing to submit to a background check and pay a $200 per book, per year tax. One of Benjamin's neighbors, retired army Colonel Vince Scott, questioned the wisdom of book prohibition. "When I was a kid, everyone owned a book, most people more than one," said Scott. "There were book stores on every corner. You could even go to a library and they'd give you a book." Judy Bliss, spokesman for the D.C.-based non profit lobbying group Think of the Children, issued a press release following news of the raid. "It's appalling that these kinds of unlicensed, unregistered books are still on our streets," said Mrs. Bliss, speaking from her limousine. "Books have incited revolutions, led people to depression and suicide, murder, all kinds of horrible things. Take Romeo and Juliet for example. That play was definitively linked to teen suicide. Or take Machiavilli's The Prince, a treatise about political ruthlessness that has been on the nightstands of tyrants around the world. No civilized society allows untrained civilians to possess and use books like these. This 'book culture' needs to be stamped out." Citizens wishing to report illicit book possession are encouraged to call the federal hotline at 1-888-ISNITCH. (Ok folks relax its just SATIRE! However Fahrenheit 451 doesn't sound so farfetched now, does it? Thanks to John T. at www.mythofsisyphus.net who found this posted on the LPI-Discuss board by El Presidente David Hughes. -- Frodo) ##########
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Link Posted: 6/15/2003 7:10:16 AM EDT
Sounds like a book I read titled "Fahrenheit 451" by Ray Bradbury. A classic book with a bleak vision of the future. Unfortunetly this fiction is becoming reality.
Link Posted: 6/15/2003 7:12:12 AM EDT
dude....in 50 years it will be illegal to be fat..... -HS
Link Posted: 6/15/2003 7:13:10 AM EDT
Link Posted: 6/15/2003 7:18:31 AM EDT
First, you get mail from someone named "Frodo"? [;d] Second, the irony of all this is that in my *public school* education, "Farenheit 451" was class reading, as was "1984", "Animal Farm", "The Red Badge of Courage", and "All Quiet on the Western Front" - just to name a few that immediately come to mind. Thanks for reminding me about these great books!
Link Posted: 6/15/2003 7:33:22 AM EDT
I even remember watching the movie(1984) in class in junior high school(back in 1972 or so). Seemed to remember that we wondered if it would really be like that in 1984.
Link Posted: 6/15/2003 7:34:11 AM EDT
Originally Posted By HillBillySasquatch: dude....in 50 years it will be illegal to be fat..... -HS
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[LOLabove]. . . [:|]
Link Posted: 6/15/2003 7:35:50 AM EDT
Originally Posted By DScott: First, you get mail from someone named "Frodo"? [;d] Second, the irony of all this is that in my *public school* education, "Farenheit 451" was class reading, as was "1984", "Animal Farm", "The Red Badge of Courage", and "All Quiet on the Western Front" - just to name a few that immediately come to mind. Thanks for reminding me about these great books!
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i remember reading a news link some time ago about "animal farm" being put on as a play in China go figure
Link Posted: 6/15/2003 7:53:17 AM EDT
Originally Posted By DScott: First, you get mail from someone named "Frodo"? [;d] Second, the irony of all this is that in my *public school* education, "Farenheit 451" was class reading, as was "1984", "Animal Farm", "The Red Badge of Courage", and "All Quiet on the Western Front" - just to name a few that immediately come to mind. Thanks for reminding me about these great books!
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And now for some more irony- All these book were at one time or another and even now may still be banned books someplace in this country. A Clockwork Orange by Anthony Burgess A Wrinkle in Time by Madeleine L'Engle Annie on My Mind by Nancy Garden As I Lay Dying by William Faulkner Blubber by Judy Blume Brave New World by Aldous Huxley Bridge to Terabithia by Katherine Paterson Canterbury Tales by Chaucer Carrie by Stephen King Catch-22 by Joseph Heller Christine by Stephen King Confessions by Jean-Jacques Rousseau Cujo by Stephen King Curses, Hexes, and Spells by Daniel Cohen Daddy's Roommate by Michael Willhoite Day No Pigs Would Die by Robert Peck Death of a Salesman by Arthur Miller Decameron by Boccaccio East of Eden by John Steinbeck Fallen Angels by Walter Myers Fanny Hill (Memoirs of a Woman of Pleasure) by John Cleland Flowers For Algernon by Daniel Keyes Forever by Judy Blume Grendel by John Champlin Gardner Halloween ABC by Eve Merriam Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone by J.K. Rowling Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets by J.K. Rowling Harry Potter and the Prizoner of Azkaban by J.K. Rowling Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire by J.K. Rowling Have to Go by Robert Munsch Heather Has Two Mommies by Leslea Newman How to Eat Fried Worms by Thomas Rockwell Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings by Maya Angelou Impressions edited by Jack Booth In the Night Kitchen by Maurice Sendak It's Okay if You Don't Love Me by Norma Klein James and the Giant Peach by Roald Dahl Lady Chatterley's Lover by D.H. Lawrence Leaves of Grass by Walt Whitman Little Red Riding Hood by Jacob and Wilhelm Grimm Lord of the Flies by William Golding Love is One of the Choices by Norma Klein Lysistrata by Aristophanes More Scary Stories in the Dark by Alvin Schwartz My Brother Sam Is Dead by James Lincoln Collier and Christopher Collier My House by Nikki Giovanni My Friend Flicka by Mary O'Hara Night Chills by Dean Koontz Of Mice and Men by John Steinbeck On My Honor by Marion Dane Bauer One Day in The Life of Ivan Denisovich by Alexander Solzhenitsyn One Flew Over The Cuckoo's Nest by Ken Kesey One Hundred Years of Solitude by Gabriel Garcia Marquez Ordinary People by Judith Guest Our Bodies, Ourselves by Boston Women's Health Collective Prince of Tides by Pat Conroy Revolting Rhymes by Roald Dahl Scary Stories 3: More Tales to Chill Your Bones by Alvin Schwartz Scary Stories in the Dark by Alvin Schwartz Separate Peace by John Knowles Silas Marner by George Eliot Slaughterhouse-Five by Kurt Vonnegut, Jr. Tarzan of the Apes by Edgar Rice Burroughs The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain The Adventures of Tom Sawyer by Mark Twain The Bastard by John Jakes The Catcher in the Rye by J.D. Salinger The Chocolate War by Robert Cormier The Color Purple by Alice Walker The Devil's Alternative by Frederick Forsyth The Figure in the Shadows by John Bellairs The Grapes of Wrath by John Steinbeck The Great Gilly Hopkins by Katherine Paterson The Handmaid's Tale by Margaret Atwood The Headless Cupid by Zilpha Snyder The Learning Tree by Gordon Parks The Living Bible by William C. Bower The Merchant of Venice by William Shakespeare The New Teenage Body Book by Kathy McCoy and Charles Wibbelsman The Pigman by Paul Zindel The Seduction of Peter S. by Lawrence Sanders The Shining by Stephen King The Witches by Roald Dahl The Witches of Worm by Zilpha Snyder Then Again, Maybe I Won't by Judy Blume To Kill A Mockingbird by Harper Lee Twelfth Night by William Shakespeare Webster's Ninth New Collegiate Dictionary by the Merriam-Webster Editorial Staff Witches, Pumpkins, and Grinning Ghosts: The Story of the Halloween Symbols by Edna Barth
Link Posted: 6/15/2003 8:27:41 AM EDT
Originally Posted By photoman:
Originally Posted By DScott: First, you get mail from someone named "Frodo"? [;d] Second, the irony of all this is that in my *public school* education, "Farenheit 451" was class reading, as was "1984", "Animal Farm", "The Red Badge of Courage", and "All Quiet on the Western Front" - just to name a few that immediately come to mind. Thanks for reminding me about these great books!
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And now for some more irony- All these book were at one time or another and even now may still be banned books someplace in this country. A Clockwork Orange by Anthony Burgess A Wrinkle in Time by Madeleine L'Engle Annie on My Mind by Nancy Garden As I Lay Dying by William Faulkner Blubber by Judy Blume Brave New World by Aldous Huxley Bridge to Terabithia by Katherine Paterson Canterbury Tales by Chaucer Carrie by Stephen King Catch-22 by Joseph Heller Christine by Stephen King Confessions by Jean-Jacques Rousseau Cujo by Stephen King Curses, Hexes, and Spells by Daniel Cohen Daddy's Roommate by Michael Willhoite Day No Pigs Would Die by Robert Peck Death of a Salesman by Arthur Miller Decameron by Boccaccio East of Eden by John Steinbeck Fallen Angels by Walter Myers Fanny Hill (Memoirs of a Woman of Pleasure) by John Cleland Flowers For Algernon by Daniel Keyes Forever by Judy Blume Grendel by John Champlin Gardner Halloween ABC by Eve Merriam Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone by J.K. Rowling Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets by J.K. Rowling Harry Potter and the Prizoner of Azkaban by J.K. Rowling Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire by J.K. Rowling Have to Go by Robert Munsch Heather Has Two Mommies by Leslea Newman How to Eat Fried Worms by Thomas Rockwell Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings by Maya Angelou Impressions edited by Jack Booth In the Night Kitchen by Maurice Sendak It's Okay if You Don't Love Me by Norma Klein James and the Giant Peach by Roald Dahl Lady Chatterley's Lover by D.H. Lawrence Leaves of Grass by Walt Whitman Little Red Riding Hood by Jacob and Wilhelm Grimm Lord of the Flies by William Golding Love is One of the Choices by Norma Klein Lysistrata by Aristophanes More Scary Stories in the Dark by Alvin Schwartz My Brother Sam Is Dead by James Lincoln Collier and Christopher Collier My House by Nikki Giovanni My Friend Flicka by Mary O'Hara Night Chills by Dean Koontz Of Mice and Men by John Steinbeck On My Honor by Marion Dane Bauer One Day in The Life of Ivan Denisovich by Alexander Solzhenitsyn One Flew Over The Cuckoo's Nest by Ken Kesey One Hundred Years of Solitude by Gabriel Garcia Marquez Ordinary People by Judith Guest Our Bodies, Ourselves by Boston Women's Health Collective Prince of Tides by Pat Conroy Revolting Rhymes by Roald Dahl Scary Stories 3: More Tales to Chill Your Bones by Alvin Schwartz Scary Stories in the Dark by Alvin Schwartz Separate Peace by John Knowles Silas Marner by George Eliot Slaughterhouse-Five by Kurt Vonnegut, Jr. Tarzan of the Apes by Edgar Rice Burroughs The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain The Adventures of Tom Sawyer by Mark Twain The Bastard by John Jakes The Catcher in the Rye by J.D. Salinger The Chocolate War by Robert Cormier The Color Purple by Alice Walker The Devil's Alternative by Frederick Forsyth The Figure in the Shadows by John Bellairs The Grapes of Wrath by John Steinbeck The Great Gilly Hopkins by Katherine Paterson The Handmaid's Tale by Margaret Atwood The Headless Cupid by Zilpha Snyder The Learning Tree by Gordon Parks The Living Bible by William C. Bower The Merchant of Venice by William Shakespeare The New Teenage Body Book by Kathy McCoy and Charles Wibbelsman The Pigman by Paul Zindel The Seduction of Peter S. by Lawrence Sanders The Shining by Stephen King The Witches by Roald Dahl The Witches of Worm by Zilpha Snyder Then Again, Maybe I Won't by Judy Blume To Kill A Mockingbird by Harper Lee Twelfth Night by William Shakespeare Webster's Ninth New Collegiate Dictionary by the Merriam-Webster Editorial Staff Witches, Pumpkins, and Grinning Ghosts: The Story of the Halloween Symbols by Edna Barth
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Sadly, [b]this quote[/b] is too true: "There is no such thing as an underestimate of average intelligence." (Henry Adams)
Link Posted: 6/15/2003 8:43:43 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 6/15/2003 8:49:20 AM EDT by themadhatter]
illegal books
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whats a illegal book.
"These military-style books are instruments of war, plain and simple," said Special Agent Gregory Kahn. "They have no recreational purpose. "They have no legitimate civilian use."
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your all fu*ked now [wow] [nuts]
Link Posted: 6/15/2003 9:12:47 AM EDT
Link Posted: 6/15/2003 10:00:01 AM EDT
At least 5 of those were required reading when I was in school. I graduated in 94.
Link Posted: 6/15/2003 10:13:22 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 6/15/2003 10:18:28 AM EDT by jchewie]
Man - we listened to James and the Giant Peach in second grade. I don't remember much about it - does anyone have the faintest idea why it would earn a place on the banned book list? Some of these classics are definitely not suited for your average third grader, but the parents should know that and provide access at an appropriate age. Edited to say that at least 10 of these books were included throughout my public education as required reading. I graduated HS in 99
Link Posted: 6/15/2003 10:13:52 AM EDT
God forbid it ever come to that!!
Link Posted: 6/15/2003 10:24:39 AM EDT
Why are you people so resistant to giving law enforcement the tools it needs to fight terrorism? Just the other week john ashcroft, the most pro-gun attorney general in history and nra member, asked for epansion of the patriot act so the government can give us freedom from fear in this great democracy. There is absolutely nothing to worry about as these laws will ONLY be used against non-citizens. It is time that you all realize that this is no longer the 18th century with the entrance of a new era, calls for new laws.
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