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Posted: 6/14/2003 2:28:59 PM EDT
I just purchased a 02 Explorer with 16k miles.I always change the oil on used vehicles soon after purchased no matter what the previous owner tells me. Over my 20+ years of driving I have only used conventional motor oils but have been studying up on synthetics. I usally keep my vehicles for 150k or more. Wahts your experience with synthetic oils like Mobil 1/Amsoil/castrol and the like. Do they really work as advertised?? Thanks
Link Posted: 6/14/2003 2:31:22 PM EDT
Make sure there is enough oil in there. Change oil and filter when oil turns gray.
Link Posted: 6/14/2003 2:34:19 PM EDT
I keep my vehicles until the wheels fall off, literally. In my wife's '92 Toyota Camry & my '99 Merc Village, I use Catrol 5/50 Synthetic exclusively. No problems so far.
Link Posted: 6/14/2003 2:36:25 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 6/14/2003 2:37:55 PM EDT by dbrowne1]
Well, I have been labeled something of an "oil guru" on another board, so I'll chime in. For your vehicle, I doubt you'll see any benefit so long as you regularly change the oil and filter. The base and additives in synthetics can extend drain intervals, but this requires oil analysis trending to do properly. Even w/o the analysis, it will not save you any money. If your explorer is to be used for any extensive hill climbing or heavy towing, I might consider synthetic. If you do go synthetic, get REAL (PAO/Ester) synthetic. This means Mobil 1, Amsoil, or Redline. I run Mobil 1 0W40, but I have an extensively modified turbocharged car than would probably cook conventional oil, or at the least, cause coke buildup in the turbo housing and oil lines. EDIT: Go to the forums here: [URL]bobistheoilguy.com[/URL]
Link Posted: 6/14/2003 2:38:31 PM EDT
synthetics, while costly, are very good. if you change your oil every 3000 or 3 months however, i dont think they have any great advantage over conventional oils. except in performance engines, hell, royal purple can actually gain you HP.
Link Posted: 6/14/2003 2:48:48 PM EDT
What he said above, also the regular motor oils made today have much better additives, they don't break down as easily, just change your oil at the proper interval and use the correct weight, if your cars manual calls for 5W-30 use it, not anything heavier. New 2003 models are using 5W-20 it's like water.
Link Posted: 6/14/2003 2:49:53 PM EDT
Synthetic PAO types are excellent for turbocharged engines as the high speed turbo bearings need quality lubrication. PAO oils were first used in turbine engines where the heat and pressure require such a lube.
Link Posted: 6/14/2003 3:07:18 PM EDT
I use synthetic everywhere I can... When I was still racing, I'd tear down my motor once a season to freshen it up... First couple years, I noticed scuffed cylinder walls, piston skirts, and worn rod bearings... After switching over to full synthetic, the internals looked almost new at teardown... Even after melting down a few pistons, the cylinder walls saw very little scuffing. The rear diff would get pretty hot after a run down the track when I used standard gear oil,(So hot you couldn't touch it) but after switching to Mobil 1 synthetic, the temp stayed noticably cooler. Oh, I forgot to mention, my '94 Suburban has approx 220,000 miles on it, and has never had the motor torn down...(knock on wood)
Link Posted: 6/14/2003 3:10:44 PM EDT
Originally Posted By HappyJack97: What he said above, also the regular motor oils made today have much better additives, they don't break down as easily, just change your oil at the proper interval and use the correct weight, if your cars manual calls for 5W-30 use it, not anything heavier. New 2003 models are using 5W-20 it's like water.
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There is some strong evidence that these 5W20 recommendations are being made in order to increase CAFE (corporate average fuel economy) numbers and NOT to minimize wear. For example, certain identical engines get 5W20 recommendations in the U.S., and 5W30 or 10W30 overseas in similar climates. Something that thin is bound to have crappy hydrodynamic barrier properties under load. I wouldn't use it, esp in an SUV.
Link Posted: 6/14/2003 3:22:52 PM EDT
Originally Posted By dbrowne1:
Originally Posted By HappyJack97: What he said above, also the regular motor oils made today have much better additives, they don't break down as easily, just change your oil at the proper interval and use the correct weight, if your cars manual calls for 5W-30 use it, not anything heavier. New 2003 models are using 5W-20 it's like water.
View Quote
There is some strong evidence that these 5W20 recommendations are being made in order to increase CAFE (corporate average fuel economy) numbers and NOT to minimize wear. For example, certain identical engines get 5W20 recommendations in the U.S., and 5W30 or 10W30 overseas in similar climates. Something that thin is bound to have crappy hydrodynamic barrier properties under load. I wouldn't use it, esp in an SUV.
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Not an expert at engine wear etc, but I think that most wear occurs on start-up in the morning before the oil has a chance to circulate. So you would to the oil circulating ASAP, so that is the reason for the 5W rating.
Link Posted: 6/14/2003 3:27:59 PM EDT
In my experience, personal and retail sales, if your engine has [u]any[/u] oil leaks they will become much, much bigger oil leaks with synthetic oils. Something else to think about if it's an older engine.
Link Posted: 6/14/2003 3:33:02 PM EDT
Originally Posted By dbrowne1: For example, certain identical engines get 5W20 recommendations in the U.S., and 5W30 or 10W30 overseas in similar climates.
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And speaking of foreign markets...what's with the oil changes every 3,000 miles or 3 months recommended here in the US? Elsewhere, the car manufacturers recommend every 15,000 kilometers (= 9,320 miles), or once a year (after the breaking-in period).
Link Posted: 6/14/2003 3:34:09 PM EDT
Originally Posted By warlord: Not an expert at engine wear etc, but I think that most wear occurs on start-up in the morning before the oil has a chance to circulate. So you would to the oil circulating ASAP, so that is the reason for the 5W rating.
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That's true, but there is no difference in the respect between a 5W20 and a 5W50. If you really want the stuff flowing cold, get a 0WXX oil. If you are an anal bastard, get a preoiler.
Link Posted: 6/14/2003 3:53:27 PM EDT
I've run nothing but extra virgin olive oil in my '58 Edsel and have over 485,000 miles on it. I don't change the oil, I just change the filter and top off with a little water and vinegar. [;D]
Link Posted: 6/14/2003 4:10:54 PM EDT
Mobil 1 is the ultimate SHTF supply. If you think you'll ever find yourself in a situation where, for whatever reason, you don't/can't change your oil, you'll be glad you used synthetic.
Link Posted: 6/14/2003 5:08:27 PM EDT
Link Posted: 6/14/2003 7:50:59 PM EDT
Originally Posted By dbrowne1:
Originally Posted By HappyJack97: What he said above, also the regular motor oils made today have much better additives, they don't break down as easily, just change your oil at the proper interval and use the correct weight, if your cars manual calls for 5W-30 use it, not anything heavier. New 2003 models are using 5W-20 it's like water.
View Quote
There is some strong evidence that these 5W20 recommendations are being made in order to increase CAFE (corporate average fuel economy) numbers and NOT to minimize wear. For example, certain identical engines get 5W20 recommendations in the U.S., and 5W30 or 10W30 overseas in similar climates. Something that thin is bound to have crappy hydrodynamic barrier properties under load. I wouldn't use it, esp in an SUV.
View Quote
Not quite. The viscosity required is based on what the oil pressure needs to be to prevent boundary lubrication on the journals. Newer engines are better toleranced and require a lighter oil. Consequently, the lower viscosity allows for lower ring tensions, therefore reducing friction in this boundary lubrication area. CAFE isn't the direct reason, lighter oils are not as available in different countries. See what oil the current M3 uses. BTW, my VW TDI (2000) uses a 5W-30 PAO synthetic. And its immune from CAFE @ 48 MPG. And that TDI engine has far greater bearing loads than ANY gasoline engine with its compression ratio of 19.5:1.
Link Posted: 6/14/2003 8:13:17 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 6/14/2003 8:15:59 PM EDT by ScrubJ]
Oh God, here we go again!!! Use whatever oil you wish. The synthetics are better oils in the long run, but you still have to stay within the OEM recomended oil change limits. Synthetics handle high heat better, so if you tow, can be a better way to go. Look at all the 200,000 mile cars on the road using dino oil then decide. I used Rotella 15W-40 for 167,000+ miles in my '92 Probe. I am using synthetic (Mobil 1) in my new ride because I get a break in price.
Link Posted: 6/14/2003 8:32:08 PM EDT
Manufacturers pushing lighter oils is a direct result of CAFE and emission standards, run a lighter oil you get better gas mileage and 'cleaner' emissions but you kill wearability (for the same reason oil manufacturers are being pressured to remove the friction protection additives - ZDDPs- from motor oil for cars). Which means that the manufacturers can 'push the envelope' on the standards set up by the government, and they get to sell you a car sooner because your old one has worn out.
Link Posted: 6/15/2003 5:11:26 PM EDT
Originally Posted By marvl: I've run nothing but extra virgin olive oil in my '58 Edsel and have over 485,000 miles on it. I don't change the oil, I just change the filter and top off with a little water and vinegar. [;D]
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Maybe you should be on the Food Network. [img]http://www.click-smilie.de/sammlung/aktion/action-smiley-035.gif[/img]
Link Posted: 6/15/2003 10:41:47 PM EDT
I run Mobil1 5-30 in the motor and 75-90 in the gear boxes, front and rear ends of my Tacoma. The gas mileage increased slightly with the motor oil at 18K and then with the gear oil at 30K. I had a 79 ford F350 that I swithed at 50+K and put on another 100K without any motor problems.
Link Posted: 6/16/2003 5:26:49 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 6/16/2003 5:27:01 AM EDT by zx2dragon]
I've used Mobil 1 and Valvoline synthetic oils and no complaints at all. However, if you change the oil on a regular basis and do not overly stress the vehicle, you really do not need a synthetic oil. Me, I like to tinker. [:D]
Link Posted: 6/16/2003 8:51:14 AM EDT
What's everyone's take on non-synth oils by brand? I have always used Texaco Havoline--10w30 in the cooler months and 10w40 in the summer months. That was on all vehicles Honda and Nissan.
Link Posted: 6/16/2003 8:56:56 AM EDT
Castrol GTX makes the best standard dino-oil. If you change your oil every 3K, who needs the expensive stuff? Not anyone I know, but they all do anyways.
Link Posted: 6/16/2003 9:14:35 AM EDT
I've heard good things about synthetics, especially Amsoil, and another brand called Royal Purple. Those two have been rated the best by several other discussion boards I've seen. The Mobil 1 synthetic is pretty good too. I plan on switching to Amsoil exclusively after a good break in period on my new car. I will also use their oil and air filters, as they are also rated very well compared to other name brands. Bottom line: Synthetic oil? Can't hurt nothing. Go for it.
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