Warning

 

Close

Confirm Action

Are you sure you wish to do this?

Confirm Cancel
Member Login
Posted: 6/9/2003 1:19:45 PM EDT
Dumb question, I know. But what exactly is the difference. I have seen both advertised on the same brand of scopes and yet I am told they are both for ranging. Help.
Link Posted: 6/9/2003 1:24:58 PM EDT
Isn't mil-dot simply one form of rangefinding reticle?
Link Posted: 6/9/2003 1:26:28 PM EDT
Originally Posted By mattja: Isn't mil-dot simply one form of rangefinding reticle?
View Quote
Yup. I believe a rangefinding scope gives you a readout of the range, and mil-dot you have to calculate it. (Above advice is not to be taken as 100% true and may simply be conjecture)
Link Posted: 6/9/2003 1:28:33 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Sniper_Wolfe:
Originally Posted By mattja: Isn't mil-dot simply one form of rangefinding reticle?
View Quote
Yup. I believe a rangefinding scope gives you a readout of the range, and mil-dot you have to calculate it. (Above advice is not to be taken as 100% true and may simply be conjecture)
View Quote
The rangefinder scope I looked at the other day had some graphics and you still had to calculate.
Link Posted: 6/9/2003 2:57:27 PM EDT
Link Posted: 6/9/2003 3:20:38 PM EDT
The mil-dot system is really best used as a holdover and windage sighting tool at a known or well estimated range.
Link Posted: 6/9/2003 3:37:08 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 6/9/2003 3:39:54 PM EDT by Imbroglio]
I am not going to stoop to mere ad hominems, like many who do here I will help out. Mildots require some math be performed to determine target distance: target height in yards x 1000/number of mildots= range in yards The rangefinding reticles, only require the target (with a known height) be placed within the scale of the reticle to determine distance. Although this system is easier to use, the drawback is that the scale is calibrated to a specific target height (most likely 2 yards/6 feet). In both cases you must know the bullet drop at the given range for the up/down adjustment, that is if the elevation knob doesn't have bullet drop compensation setting calibrated to your specific load.
Link Posted: 6/9/2003 5:55:30 PM EDT
Ok Imbroglio, enlighten me. Using your formula a target six feet in height, that can be covered by one mil-dot, is two thousand yards away. Also, what are the horizontal mil-dots for?
Link Posted: 6/9/2003 7:55:35 PM EDT
Ok, 1 mil is the distance from the center of 1 dot to another dot. (I call that 1 mildot). For a 6 foot target (2 yards) to be 2,000 yards away it would fit 1 mil. The horizontal dots are used for the same thing when measuring horizontal targets. The dots themselves can also be used as aiming points in substitution of cranking the elevation/windage knobs. A mil dot scope is much easier to use if you have a Mildot Master.
Link Posted: 6/10/2003 1:10:18 AM EDT
Screw that precision crap. Just nuke 'em.
Link Posted: 6/10/2003 3:15:32 AM EDT
I was playing with that long range shooting sim at [url]www.shooterready.com[/url] and on their home page there is a link to a tutorial on the mil dot system.
Link Posted: 6/10/2003 6:36:21 AM EDT
Does any optics maker build a good scope with a laser-rangefinder built right in?
Link Posted: 6/10/2003 6:51:01 AM EDT
Originally Posted By Imbroglio: The dots themselves can also be used as aiming points in substitution of cranking the elevation/windage knobs.
View Quote
I believe the most accurate way to utilize mildots is to actually use your come-ups to adjust the crosshairs based on you calculated estimation of distance. You can use the horizontal mildots to estimate winddrift at the given estimated range. You have to know what a 5mph or 10mph wind will do to your projectile at the estimated distance. Everything else sounds right....and yes I believe a Mildot Master would make it easier.[:D]
Link Posted: 6/10/2003 7:04:30 AM EDT
Originally Posted By Torf: Does any optics maker build a good scope with a laser-rangefinder built right in?
View Quote
[url=www.gunaccessories.com/Swarovski/LaserRangefindingScope/index.asp]yes someone does[/url]
Link Posted: 6/10/2003 8:01:12 AM EDT
Originally Posted By photoman:
Originally Posted By Torf: Does any optics maker build a good scope with a laser-rangefinder built right in?
View Quote
[url=www.gunaccessories.com/Swarovski/LaserRangefindingScope/index.asp]yes someone does[/url]
View Quote
DoH! $4000?!? I could duct-tape a Yardage Pro 1000 to a Leupold for under a grand!
Link Posted: 6/10/2003 8:03:04 AM EDT
Originally Posted By SHIVAN458:
Originally Posted By Imbroglio: The dots themselves can also be used as aiming points in substitution of cranking the elevation/windage knobs.
View Quote
I believe the most accurate way to utilize mildots is to actually use your come-ups to adjust the crosshairs based on you calculated estimation of distance. You can use the horizontal mildots to estimate winddrift at the given estimated range. You have to know what a 5mph or 10mph wind will do to your projectile at the estimated distance. Everything else sounds right....and yes I believe a Mildot Master would make it easier.[:D]
View Quote
It would be easier to do what Imbrog is talking about if they made a [b]grid[/b] scope. It is too hard to estimate 3 mildots down, and 2.5 mildots to the left, because you are off axis.
Link Posted: 6/10/2003 2:07:53 PM EDT
Larry, check out this link for a good explination of the mildot reticle. The key to using the mildot is knowing the size (either height or length) of the target. If you know the size it is pretty simple to figure the distance. [url]http://www.swfa.com/mildot/index.html[/url] If you go with the mildot check out the Mildot Master. It really make the mildot a breeze to use and gives you holdover or moa adjustment info as well as having slope compensating ability. [url]www.mildotmaster.com[/url] Getting a new scope for that AR10? Check out the Springfield Armory Gov't Gen 2 or 3. Might as well have a scope and rifle from the same hometown. I bought the Gen 3 for my AR10 and liked it so well I put it on the 50. I shoot up to 1200yds with the Springfield scope and Mildot Master with great success.
Link Posted: 6/10/2003 3:14:05 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Torf: Does any optics maker build a good scope with a laser-rangefinder built right in?
View Quote
At the 1999 or 2000 SHOT show there was a company displaying a real trick scope that not only laser ranged the target, but automatically adjusted the reticle for bullet drop. Can't remember how much they wanted for it though.
Top Top