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Posted: 6/1/2003 5:50:47 AM EDT
I'm in an arguement right now in another site with a gun grabber. This person is argueing that the National Guard serves the purpose of the "States Militia". What I want to know is: *Did you ever swear an oath to an individual state? *Does the National Guard chain of command extend through the U.S.Army? *What the official title of the National Gaurd e.g. U.S. Army National Guard, or "State Name" National Guard
Link Posted: 6/1/2003 6:28:43 AM EDT
*Did you ever swear an oath to an individual state? No, the oath taken is the same exact one that is taken by active duty members. The differance is that the NG has a state mission and a federal mission. *Does the National Guard chain of command extend through the U.S.Army? During peacetime each state National Guard answers to the leadership in the 50 states, three territories and the District of Columbia. During national emergencies, however, the President reserves the right to mobilize the National Guard, putting them in federal duty status. While federalized, the units answer to the Combatant Commander of the theatre in which they are operating and, ultimately, to the President. Even when not federalized, the Army National Guard has a federal obligation (or mission.) That mission is to maintain properly trained and equipped units, available for prompt mobilization for war, national emergency, or as otherwise needed. The National Guard Bureau (NGB) was formed to assist the states, territories and District of Columbia procure funding for the Guard, administer policies and act as a liaison between the Departments of the Army and Air Force and the states. The NGB is a joint bureau of the Departments of the Army and Air Force, and functions in both a staff and an operating capacity for each component. The NGB performs the federal functions of the Army National Guard (ARNG) and the Air National Guard (ANG). The senior leader at NGB is the Chief, National Guard Bureau, usually a Lieutenant General. The Army National Guard and the Air National Guard are each led by their own director. The two directors are selected by the Secretary of the Army (for the Director of the Army National Guard) and the Secretary of the Air Force (for the Director of the Air National Guard.) Both directors report to the Chief of the NGB. Full-time staffs support the Chief of the NGB and the directors of the ARNG and the ANG. When ARNG units are not mobilized under federal control, they report to the Adjutant General of their state or territory, or in the case of the District of Columbia, the Commanding General. Each Adjutant General is responsible to the Governor of his state (or in the case of the District of Columbia, the mayor.) *What the official title of the National Gaurd e.g. U.S. Army National Guard, or "State Name" National Guard Army National Guard or Air National Guard. If you examine the II Amendment, "A well regulated Militia, being necessary to the security of a free State, the right of the people to keep and bear Arms, shall not be infringed." It is clear that it is composed of 2 parts. The first addressing the need for a military (A well regulated Militia being necessary to the security of a free State.) and the second addressing the right of the people to be armed in addition to that militia (The right of the people to keep and bear Arms shall not be infringed.). Those that say that the II Amendment only gives the right to bear arms to the militia are simply wrong.
Link Posted: 6/1/2003 6:34:43 AM EDT
Our state laws actually list Four militia forces of the state: 1) The National Guard 2) The State Guard. They go to unpaid drills, are subject to call-out and generally can't be called to federal service. Wear the same uniform as the National Guard. Armed with shotguns and pistols. Last major deployment was during WWII when they did martial law in couple of towns that were having violent labor strikes, and the National Guard was all in Italy killing Germans. They still do minor stuff at major disasters and events; 3) The State Reserve Guard (hasn't been staffed since the 19th Century); 4) The unorganized Militia, which is all able-bodied males between 18-60 who aren't on active duty, serving in another recognized statemilitia component, or are Peace Officers or Firefighters. When I was sworn in to the National Guard several years ago, I took the same oath I did for Active Duty and the Army reserves, which oddly enough is the exact same oath I have taken as a cop.
Link Posted: 6/1/2003 6:36:00 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 6/1/2003 6:37:09 AM EDT by centermass181]
Mass has its own recognized "militia", theyre supposed to step in if the MAARNG gets called up to storm the beaches of (insert country here) again. They have theyre own equip, trucks, etc. Kind of scary actually, we use them for OPFOR once and again Ditto on Natez's oath statement.
Link Posted: 6/1/2003 6:46:28 AM EDT
I just found out that there are state militias, completely seperate from federal control. [url]http://www.sgaus.org/[/url] I had no idea.
Link Posted: 6/1/2003 6:52:23 AM EDT
Now thats an answer! Thanks Stryker. I'm argueing with a member of "Handgun Free America" and of course the issue of The right to keep and bear arms as an individual right is totally unacceptable to these people. This person directed me to their interpretation of the 2nd amendment[url]http://www.handgunfree.org/HFAMain/topics/secondamendment/default.htm[/url] in which it states that the states militia should be free from interferance from the federal government. I just wanted to show them that the Guard does not fufill this roll.
Link Posted: 6/1/2003 7:40:36 AM EDT
This is why we have lawyers I suppose, so they can argue the definition of the word "is". The II Amendment can be interpretated either way I suppose, depending upon your personal beliefs. The use of a compound complex sentence in the II Amendment confuses the issue. When the Bill of Rights was ratified, personal ownership of firearms by citizens who were not a part of the militia was common and not an issue. This did not become an issue until the 20th century and organized crime became a media sensation. If you want to know exactly what the origional framers of the Constitution meant when the wrote the II Amendment, look no further than the origional 13 colonies state Constitutions. Pennsylvania: Article I, Section 21. The right of the citizens to bear arms in defense of themselves and the State shall not be questioned. Seems pretty clear to me.
Link Posted: 6/1/2003 12:43:27 PM EDT
I swore the standard oath, and a second to the state of Michigan and to obey that chain of officers.
Link Posted: 6/1/2003 8:58:49 PM EDT
Took an oath the defend the USA and the state of CT. Defending the constitution was also thrown in there, but the chain of command doesn't care about that part.
Link Posted: 6/1/2003 9:15:32 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Mmanwitgun: Took an oath the defend the USA and the state of CT. Defending the constitution was also thrown in there, but the chain of command doesn't care about that part.
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Great, now do something about 53-202a! [:D] -934
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