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Posted: 6/1/2003 5:15:35 AM EDT
Guys: I've got a Leupold Vari-X III 6.5-20x40mm that I would like to put on my BM V-Match. Only issue is that scope is gloss and looks out of place on an AR. Anyone have any suggestions on how to make finish matte w/o making an fXXXing mess? ZT
Link Posted: 6/1/2003 5:20:50 AM EDT
very simple, sell it and buy one with a matte finish!
Link Posted: 6/1/2003 5:40:31 AM EDT
Call Leupold they have a scope rebuild/recondition service, I'm sure they could replace the tube and eyepiece, it would have to be cheaper than a new scope.
Link Posted: 6/1/2003 5:47:35 AM EDT
Krylon makes a clear "Matte Finish" that will easily do the trick, IF you really want to put paint on it.
Link Posted: 6/1/2003 5:49:40 AM EDT
400 grit sandpaper, small circular motion [:D]
Link Posted: 6/1/2003 5:51:29 AM EDT
Wipe the scope off with some solvent. Put it on it's end on a tabble and put a piece of glass or ceramic tile on the lens pointing up. Paint it with some BBQ grill paint. Make sure you press lightly on whatever you use to cover the lens that is pointing up. Wait an hour, flip it over, and repeat the process to get any places that were missed. Balming
Link Posted: 6/1/2003 5:54:36 AM EDT
After you paint it, the scope will be worthless to anyone but you. That's a fairly nice scope to be using paint on it. Some folks have used the 'Bow-Flage' to camo their entire rifle/scope/rings/bipod with and had good results. I think this is removable paint, too. Might try that on your scope. I've painted one scope. Old Redfield. Matte black over gloss. It worked, but it still looks like it's painted...
Link Posted: 6/1/2003 6:01:45 AM EDT
Burlap and a hot glue gun worked for me, It's been on there for 3 yrs. The older it gets the better it looks. plus it's Carlos Hathcock cool.
Link Posted: 6/1/2003 6:09:02 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 6/1/2003 6:11:24 AM EDT by zutrooper]
Originally Posted By BusMaster007: After you paint it, the scope will be worthless to anyone but you. That's a fairly nice scope to be using paint on it.....It worked, but it still looks like it's painted...
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Paint has me real concerned. I have used the Krylon "ultra flat" on acessoires, but not on a $500+ scope. I'll e-mail Leupold for suggestions. BTW, this in AO model. Paint would probably work its way into the focus mechanism and mess things up bad.
Link Posted: 6/1/2003 6:38:11 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 6/1/2003 6:41:56 AM EDT by oneshot1kill]
We used to paint everything in the Marines, either with spray or by hand, inluding the old Unertl scopes. I'm not sure what kind of paint we used because it was in plain packaging with an NSN number. It looks good at first but it will chip after some field use. If you go that route here are a few tips from a class on painting a scope. I can't remember what website posted this originally so I don't have a url. MATERIAL. Lens paper and tape are the only materials necessary. Any solid tape will work. Masking tape is preferred. The reason for this is that it doesn’t leave any residue behind and can be torn by hand easily if no sharp instrument is on hand. SCOPE a. The scope is broken down into two groups. The first being the objective and viewing lenses. And secondly, the elevation and windage turrets. 1) OBJECTIVE AND VIEWING LENSES. These must be covered so as to protect the coating on the lenses and so viewing remains unobstructed. To do this, you must cut a piece of tape large enough to fit over the lens. This maintains a paint free lens. Before applying it to the lens, you must fold two to three pieces of lens paper and insert them in the lens well. Then apply tape. After it is applied, you may trim it. 2) ELEVATION AND WINDAGE TURRETS. These must be covered to protect the rubber "0" rings that waterproof the turrets. Also, the numbers on the turret must remain clearly visible and the turret easy to move. To do this, cut a strip of tape to completely encircle the turret, making sure that it covers to the outer edges of the numbers and includes the "0" rings. You must also cut a 1/4" x 1/4" square piece of tape to cover the allen screws. This ensures smooth and easy operation of the screws and allows you to properly zero the rifle.
Link Posted: 6/1/2003 6:55:54 AM EDT
Get it glass bead blasted.
Link Posted: 6/1/2003 11:36:53 AM EDT
bead blasted? ANy Idea where to get that type of work done?
Link Posted: 6/1/2003 3:11:35 PM EDT
Is bead blasting OK on soft metal? Or do they not have aluminum tubes or other parts that could be damaged?
Link Posted: 6/1/2003 3:31:31 PM EDT
Originally Posted By prk: Is bead blasting OK on soft metal? Or do they not have aluminum tubes or other parts that could be damaged?
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Glass beads on aluminum would do just fine. PG
Link Posted: 6/1/2003 3:36:47 PM EDT
Originally Posted By zutrooper: bead blasted? ANy Idea where to get that type of work done?
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If you were closer I would help ya. Just make sure they use GLASS BEADS a fine mesh size [can't remember the #] be careful what they do use because of impregnating the tube with iron fragments =rust PG
Link Posted: 6/1/2003 3:42:36 PM EDT
Originally Posted By fixer: very simple, sell it and buy one with a matte finish!
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IMO, this, BY FAR, has been the best suggestion. I wouldn't paint a $500 scope.
Link Posted: 6/1/2003 3:44:05 PM EDT
Premier Reticles does refinishing. It costs $160 though.[:O] They tear the scope completely down, repaint, bake, and then rebuild, so I guess the price isn't that bad. [url]http://www.premierreticles.com/index2.html[/url] If you download their catalog, it's at the bottom of page 2. CHRIS
Link Posted: 6/1/2003 4:06:24 PM EDT
I think the best thing is to talk to Leapold. I've heard nothing but absolutely GREAT things about thier customer service. They will help you.
Link Posted: 6/1/2003 4:13:26 PM EDT
Sell it and buy a matte scope.
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