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Posted: 5/28/2003 7:39:18 AM EDT
My daughter will be entering college for the Summer Term in a few weeks and it's time to buy her a notebook computer for high school graduation. I got an electric typewriter for my graduation but my wife doesn’t think I should pass it down to her as technology has changed a bit since the late 1970’s [;)]. I wanted to know if there is any preference with today’s college student on the brand of notebook computer being used. The only guideline from the school is that it needs to have a NIC card (which they all seem to have these days). When I was in school we didn’t even have personal computers and even though I’m in the computer industry, I am a little ignorant of the various models of notebook computers on the market these days. I am looking for a lightweight and affordable computer. Also, let me know about any software that you think might be useful to her. She plans to study education. Thanks in advance for your time and replies FL(Proud Parent)Greg
Link Posted: 5/28/2003 7:41:01 AM EDT
Apple iBook with an airport card.
Link Posted: 5/28/2003 7:41:18 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 5/28/2003 7:45:55 AM EDT by NoVaGator]
I'd suggest a Toshiba. Best Buy has several models in the $1000 range that will work nicely for a college student. This one: [url] http://www.bestbuy.com/detail.asp?e=11214063&m=488&cat=494&scat=495[/url] is $850 after rebates. It has 512mb of RAM, 40 gig HD, CD-RW. I remember when 512mb cost more than $1k.
Link Posted: 5/28/2003 7:42:19 AM EDT
get a dell. They have the best prices.
Link Posted: 5/28/2003 8:35:00 AM EDT
Don't buy Dell .......they're anti gun! Charlie
Link Posted: 5/28/2003 8:50:56 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 5/28/2003 8:51:28 AM EDT by Cerebus]
You're best bet is an IBM Thinkpad. [b]No-one[/b] makes a better built laptop, and they have every price/performance combination you could ask for. On top of that, customer service and tech support are outstanding. Most models have a 3 year warranty, and if something goes wrong within those 3 years, they overnight you a prepaid box for shipping and you'll have it back within 3 days. Stay away from Dell ...quality control is seriously lacking at that company.
Link Posted: 5/28/2003 8:56:02 AM EDT
In terms of software, I'm just gonna say Kazaa. I wouldn't buy her an apple, as most college campuses are going to be IBM dominant, and if she has to turn in disks with her papers (I had to) then there could be compatibility issues. I have always bought my computers from small time vendors, and have had great luck doing that. With that said I did finally buy a Gateway laptop and I think it's a piece of crap. I would second IBM. Granted, you're paying a little more for the name, but your'e also paying a little more for the reputation and customer service. Another option would be the Sony Vaio. Typically very small, very lightweight, and very multimedia friendly, as long as your digicam and videocam are sony.
Link Posted: 5/28/2003 8:59:01 AM EDT
Not too many years ago, Apple had a major relationship with most public schools. Both of my kids' schoolrooms have some kind of Mac in them. You might check for education discounts first.
Link Posted: 5/28/2003 9:02:25 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 5/28/2003 9:08:23 AM EDT by Gloftoe]
Link Posted: 5/28/2003 9:02:56 AM EDT
Does she HAVE to get a laptop? If not, buy her a real computer. Easier upgrades, cheaper upgrades and more power.
Link Posted: 5/28/2003 9:12:28 AM EDT
What major is she going to be in? I'm in Chem E, and work in the engineering computer lab here at U of Delaware. Liberal-artsy types can get away with a Mac, but if she's going into engineering, DEFINITELY get a Windows machine. There's all sorts of math/engineering programs that are commonly used in the classroom/projects that are only in Windows. Get one with a Zip Drive (internal or external, doesnt matter really). Everyone uses them, and they are one of the most easy ways to transfer information. In my experiences, professors will more often than not say that presentations will be done using a PowerPoint presentation stored on a Zip disk, to ensure that there wont be any screwing around with swapping out CD/Floppy/Zip drives or worrying about software compatibility during a 50 minute class with 10 presentations scheduled. Another little thing to consider would be one of those USB memory keys (the 16-128meg keychain storage things), they're very handy for transfering data between a laptop and a desktop (without worrying about FTP or network issues, or having to carry around the zip or floppy drive) or for leaving the laptop at home and just using a computer lab. You can give a zipdisk to a project-mate and not really worry about losing it, but the memory key can be used for backing up all sorts of critical information and projects and she'll always have it if she keeps it on her keys. Kharn
Link Posted: 5/28/2003 9:28:21 AM EDT
Thinkpad, if she has to have a laptop Otherwise Id just got with a regular desktop, that way it can be more easily upgraded later on. I was going ot get a laptop for college until I realized that I would have never used it. I have a computer at my dorm and if I need a computer at college they have over 3000 of them.
Link Posted: 5/28/2003 9:37:11 AM EDT
Apple iBook or Powerbook if you can afford the higher price. Macs are superior products and Apple has great discounts for college students.
Link Posted: 5/28/2003 9:46:47 AM EDT
Sony Vaio with Microsoft Office is what my daughter will be using when college starts this fall.
Link Posted: 5/28/2003 9:49:45 AM EDT
Another thought: In addition to her major, what operating system are the majority of the computer labs associated with her major, and what's the majority over the entire campus? A quick search of her school's website should tell you. Knowing the dominating brand on campus is also good, major universities usually have free technical support and if you have the same brand as most of their systems, its even better. Kharn
Link Posted: 5/28/2003 9:57:18 AM EDT
I'm a college professor. I would certainly recommend a notebook over a desktop. Unless your daughter is a gaming geek, any modern notebook will be sufficient for 4 years of use. The reason for the notebook is that her residence will, more than likely, not be the best place for productive schoolwork. The library, student center, coffee shop, or friends places will be more common. Best to be mobile, and wireless. I recommend Dell to my students since there is no sales tax, and the prices are good. I would stay away from macs. Although Macs are popular with alot of faculty, the IT people will be less accomodating, and alot of educational and proprietary software is not compatible with Macs. In my department, we use separate quizzing and homework software. Both are PC only, and alot of students become disgruntled when they have to go find a campus PC when they already have a $3000 Mac. My recommendation (for 4 years of service) would be a 14" or 15" monitor with sxga resolution. I recommend sxga or uxga resolution in a laptop so you can have two useful windows open side by side. I.E. Word and a DVD movie, or Word and Excel, or Powerpoint and Explorer... Her computer will be her productive and social portal, don't skimp. I recommend a DVD/CDRW combo drive. The ability to burn optical media is a MUST. Aside from this, keep it as small as possible (around 6 pounds or less) Pentium 4, not Celeron, and at least 256 meg of ram. Often it is cheaper to buy a system with 128 megs, and buy 128 or 256 additional at a considerable savings. I have a Dell 8200, and I find it a little big for toting around. It is great as a desktop replacement, however.
Link Posted: 5/28/2003 10:11:34 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 5/28/2003 10:22:10 AM EDT by NOVA5]
Originally Posted By bung: Apple iBook with an airport card.
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umm.. how about.. NO. very very few colleges still use appleware. Get whatever college she is going to is using. if they are using apple, get her an apple. if PCs. get her a pc lappy. I have a toshiba 1415-s105. 1.8 Celly(or 1.6 cant remember.. not enough diff to care either). 15" screen Nvida Gforce4 420 MX Go. (hey its a laptop. not my gamerdesktop) DVD/CDRW combo drive. Lan/modem Wireless ready. i just need to get a orinoco minipci card for it. 2 Type2 PCcard slots. 20gig HD. 256meg ram (one stick) 3 USB 1.1s nice little lappy for $750. watch the sunday ads for deals also watch [url]www.slickdeals.net[/url] [url]www.fatwallet.com[/url] Forums - Hot Deals difference between Celly and P4 for regular apps is zero. however for high end computational work, graphics design ,ect the p4 will walk all over the celly don't count AMD out either. mine came with XP home and works. it now has XP Pro and Office 2003 Beta2. i also have 2.4 and 5Ghz wireless ability. though w USB antenna (2.4) and a Dlink airpro card(5GHz). AVOID xp home if shes going to college. some less that friendly geeks with a crush on her and a stalker mind could easily mess with XP home systems over the network. Xp Pro is far more secure.
Link Posted: 5/28/2003 10:11:54 AM EDT
2 more cents from me... If she is going into an artsy type program (Art, Graphic Design, etc), I'd change my vote to a Mac of some type ...but [b]ONLY[/b] if she'll be in this type of program. They're a waste of money for any other purpose. Do not get anything with Win9x (doubt you still could) or WinME ...you'll just be inviting trouble. Get Win2k or WinXP Pro.
Link Posted: 5/28/2003 10:38:13 AM EDT
Originally Posted By NOVA5:
Originally Posted By bung: Apple iBook with an airport card.
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umm.. how about.. NO. very very few colleges still use appleware. Get whatever college she is going to is using. if they are using apple, get her an apple. if PCs. get her a pc lappy. I have a toshiba 1415-s105. 1.8 Celly(or 1.6 cant remember.. not enough diff to care either). 15" screen Nvida Gforce4 420 MX Go. (hey its a laptop. not my gamerdesktop) DVD/CDRW combo drive. Lan/modem Wireless ready. i just need to get a orinoco minipci card for it. 2 Type2 PCcard slots. 20gig HD. 256meg ram (one stick) 3 USB 1.1s nice little lappy for $750. watch the sunday ads for deals also watch [url]www.slickdeals.net[/url] [url]www.fatwallet.com[/url] Forums - Hot Deals difference between Celly and P4 for regular apps is zero. however for high end computational work, graphics design ,ect the p4 will walk all over the celly don't count AMD out either. mine came with XP home and works. it now has XP Pro and Office 2003 Beta2. i also have 2.4 and 5Ghz wireless ability. though w USB antenna (2.4) and a Dlink airpro card(5GHz). AVOID xp home if shes going to college. some less that friendly geeks with a crush on her and a stalker mind could easily mess with XP home systems over the network. Xp Pro is far more secure.
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I will definitely second the xp pro. If her college uses a domain, she might have trouble with xp home.
Link Posted: 5/28/2003 10:40:20 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 5/28/2003 10:42:04 AM EDT by NOVA5]
Originally Posted By Kharn: What major is she going to be in? I'm in Chem E, and work in the engineering computer lab here at U of Delaware. Liberal-artsy types can get away with a Mac, but if she's going into engineering, DEFINITELY get a Windows machine. There's all sorts of math/engineering programs that are commonly used in the classroom/projects that are only in Windows. Get one with a Zip Drive (internal or external, doesnt matter really). Everyone uses them, and they are one of the most easy ways to transfer information. In my experiences, professors will more often than not say that presentations will be done using a PowerPoint presentation stored on a Zip disk, to ensure that there wont be any screwing around with swapping out CD/Floppy/Zip drives or worrying about software compatibility during a 50 minute class with 10 presentations scheduled. Another little thing to consider would be one of those USB memory keys (the 16-128meg keychain storage things), they're very handy for transfering data between a laptop and a desktop (without worrying about FTP or network issues, or having to carry around the zip or floppy drive) or for leaving the laptop at home and just using a computer lab. You can give a zipdisk to a project-mate and not really worry about losing it, but the memory key can be used for backing up all sorts of critical information and projects and she'll always have it if she keeps it on her keys. Kharn
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forget the zip drive its a overly costly and far out dated technology. its time the profs update themselves to USB thumbdrives. second CDRW is more useful than Zipdisk. 540-650 megs of data that is easy to rewrite. everyone has a CD drive. most CD drives can read CDRWs without a problem inside of windows. zipdisks are still expensive for what they are. CDRWs are cheaper. be aware that to get DVD/CDRW combo drive in many systems you have to pay extra(sometims $200). ALL toshiba Satellite's have them standard. its a harddock drive, nonswap. there is no floppy, there however is a place for one so you can upgrade to it sometimes. a USB floppydrive can be gotton for $30-$50 if its really needed. IR may somtimes be useful. but rarley. [detour] i used the IR on my handheld WinCE system.. once for a legitmate reason. i had to run in from the car through a rainstorm. the takehome test i printed out had been soaked. however i had a copy of the file on my handheld. open the file stuck it infront of the ir on the printer. viola instant copy. IR can be useful. just not often.[/detour] Touchpad or Stick mouse? i prefer touchpad. many dells have both. IBM had just the stickmouse. you can get a USB mouse for regular dorm use. but a classroom desk may be to cramped to permit a real mouse. so either a mini mouse or the laptops own input method. have her use both. i bet she will prefer the touchpad. the sticks are a pain. IBM seems to love them thou. my tosh only has the touchpad. i have a mini mouse for it as well. i use that when i have the space. however when in my lap or on a tray its touchpad time. wireless mice also exist for laptops. a little bigger than mini mice.. but not much.... WHY do these exist? its not like a desktop where wireless can be a nice way to hide the wires. now a long distance wireless mouse (40ft or so) i understand. excellent for moving around during a presentation.
Link Posted: 5/28/2003 10:48:56 AM EDT
What is your budget? For less than 1000 I would reccomend a SOTEC. For more than 1000 I would reccomend a apple. In any case watch this site. http://bensbargains.net/
Link Posted: 5/28/2003 10:50:42 AM EDT
Originally Posted By triburst1: Apple iBook or Powerbook if you can afford the higher price. Macs are superior products and Apple has great discounts for college students.
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BAHHAHAHAHAHAHA! is that why they have a single diget market share?
Link Posted: 5/28/2003 10:56:50 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 5/28/2003 11:00:50 AM EDT by NOVA5]
[url]http://www.fatwallet.com/forums/messageview.cfm?catid=18&threadid=185017[/url] looks like a nice deal 599 for a *lifted from bestbuy.com* Toshiba 1135-s125 PRODUCT FEATURES Intel® Celeron® processor 1.8GHz 256MB SDRAM for multitasking power, expandable to 1.0GB 15" TFT active-matrix display 30.0GB enhanced-IDE hard drive DVD-ROM/CD-RW combo drive Integrated Intel® 852GM chipset with 32MB video memory, Direct 3D and OpenGL support; TV-out Integrated 10/100 Ethernet LAN V.92 high-speed modem with data and fax support Weighs 6.8 lbs./1.7" thin for easy portability; removable, rechargeable LiIon battery with AC adapter Windows XP Home Edition operating system preinstalled Compaq2135 Intel® Celeron® processor 1.8GHz 256MB 266MHz DDR SDRAM for multitasking capabilities, upgradable to 1.0GB 15" XGA TFT display 30.0GB hard drive DVD-ROM/CD-RW combo drive ATI Mobility RADEON 4X AGP 3D graphics; 64MB shared DDR video memory; S-video TV-out Integrated 10/100Base-T Ethernet card with RJ-45 connector V.90/V.92 high-speed modem Weighs 7.25 lbs./less than 1.6" thin for easy portability; high-capacity LiIon battery with AC adapter Windows XP Home Edition operating system preinstalled ---------- I don't know how good or bad the Intel Video chipset is. the ATI one is good. with the dedicated memory (both have this) it doesnt leach any off the system memory so its faster and doesnt slow the system down. if you see it say XX Shared Megs Memory.. RUN! power robbing muggerfugger! dvd playback is also hampered by shared mem.
Link Posted: 5/28/2003 10:59:53 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 5/28/2003 11:03:29 AM EDT by fearlessrogue]
The post above mine is a nice deal!!! Apples are well made machines. They are well though out machines. They are lite. They do not get hot. They run stable as hell. They come in nice packages. They get a shit load of battery time.
Link Posted: 5/28/2003 11:07:46 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 5/28/2003 11:10:32 AM EDT by NOVA5]
Originally Posted By fearlessrogue: The post above mine is a nice deal!!! Apples are well made machines. They are well though out machines. They are lite.
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Mostly yes. make it a industrial one and damn thing weighs a ton!
They do not get hot.
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yes they do
They run stable as hell.
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very yes. until that fan breaks.. then no system works right ;) ahh heat how nice
They come in nice packages.
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macs look.. very feminine. i dislike the look of some such as the Viao.
They get a shit load of battery time.
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2-3 hours max for most laps. mac or pc. and that is average use. watching a dvd movie shortens it. processor and screen are the biggest powerhogs. thou your mac may get more... because its SLOWER!
Link Posted: 5/28/2003 11:10:46 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 5/28/2003 11:15:15 AM EDT by Kharn]
Nova5: Zips might be outdated, but thats what people use. They are the new 3.5" floppy. Check out any large college computer lab, and I bet they will have zip drives either internally or external drives you can borrow (if you give your student ID as colateral) to plug into the lab computers. CDRWs are slower to write to, larger form factor, can scratch/break easily, and nobody has 650megs of stuff they need to cart around. Also, not every CD drive is a CDRW, but every Zip drive can read and write the 100meg disk without a problem. As I previously stated, I work in the University computer labs (the Mech Eng labs, specifically, but there are probably 20 more on campus for different departments, ranging from 4 to 50 computers). I NEVER see anyone using the CD rom drives (all computers have CDRWs), while everyone uses the Zip drives (every computer at UDel either has an internal zip drive, or the site assistant has several USB external drives locked in a cabinet that they will lend out). You want to bet 10% of your semester grade on your professor's laptop (which could be anywhere from brand spanking new to 5 years old) having a USB port AND the drivers to use the USB key? I wouldnt, I listen when they say they will have a Zip drive and nothing else. Its your responsibility to have your presentation on what format the prof wants it, not the prof's responsibility to accomodate the latest fad. Kharn
Link Posted: 5/28/2003 11:30:07 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 5/28/2003 11:31:55 AM EDT by NOVA5]
Originally Posted By Kharn: Nova5: Zips might be outdated, but thats what people use. They are the new 3.5" floppy. Check out any large college computer lab, and I bet they will have zip drives either internally or external drives you can borrow (if you give your student ID as colateral) to plug into the lab computers. CDRWs are slower to write to, larger form factor, can scratch/break easily, and nobody has 650megs of stuff they need to cart around. Also, not every CD drive is a CDRW, but every Zip drive can read and write the 100meg disk without a problem.
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i never stated ever CD is a CDRW but all modern CD drives can read CDRWs.
As I previously stated, I work in the University computer labs (the Mech Eng labs, specifically, but there are probably 20 more on campus for different departments, ranging from 4 to 50 computers). I NEVER see anyone using the CD rom drives (all computers have CDRWs), while everyone uses the Zip drives (every computer at UDel either has an internal zip drive, or the site assistant has several USB external drives locked in a cabinet that they will lend out).
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your uni is backwards then. all the places i have worked at have CDRW drive in the systems. and students use them for work. do you really see students buying $150-$200 zipdrives or $25-$50 CDRWs (after rebates that are common today) Media for CDR/CDRW disks is far cheaper than ZIP. CDRWS write faster than external Zips. internal its equal or better for the CDRW.
You want to bet 10% of your semester grade on your professor's laptop (which could be anywhere from brand spanking new to 5 years old) having a USB port AND the drivers to use the USB key? I wouldnt, I listen when they say they will have a Zip drive and nothing else. Its your responsibility to have your presentation on what format the prof wants it, not the prof's responsibility to accomodate the latest fad. Kharn
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Time for the prof to change his ways. zips are dying away. true USB is not everywhere. but major unis should have relativly recent systems. 2000 or later. midlevel to low colleges will have lesser systems. hence the CDRW disk. CDRW is cheaper on the students wallet. the problem is.. explaining the difference between CDR and CDRW to a programming instructor.... can you belive it took 4 explanations of the basic differences of it over the course of 4 semsters to get this damn fool to understand that she was telling her students the wrong damn info! had her students treating the CDR like a CDRW.. and wondered why after the 4th write it stopped working... thats the funny thing with programmers... their off in their own little world. kinda like liberals ;) while true many students will not have them at home they also wont have zipdrives at home. i would tell the instructor to stuff it and burn them a CDR copy. ive got a IDE zipdrive lying around my parts cabinate. never sold it.. last one i bought. there wasnt any call for them anymore. so there it sits until someone who bought one from me has theirs die and needs another or until someone wants one. i won't be buying any more, dead technology is nothing to invest it.
Link Posted: 5/28/2003 11:50:35 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 5/28/2003 11:51:11 AM EDT by Kharn]
Nova5: Do you want to explain CD vs CDR vs CDRW and their varying abilities to write to a CD to a graduate student from the other side of the planet who doesnt even speak English beyond the basics of ordering a pizza? With Zips, if it doesnt fit in the hole, its not gonna work and everybody understands that concept. Kharn
Link Posted: 5/30/2003 6:41:16 PM EDT
NOVA5 just convinced me to sell all of my Apple products for superior Windows based machines. [rolleyes]
Link Posted: 5/30/2003 6:47:06 PM EDT
I have a HP Pavilion N5000 and its a real good computer for the price. It has a 15" screen, 1.2 GB processor, 30 GB HD, CD burner with DVD player. I paid about $1000 for it at Best Buy.
Link Posted: 5/30/2003 7:48:34 PM EDT
Link Posted: 5/30/2003 8:00:59 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 5/30/2003 8:13:26 PM EDT by Dave_A]
1) Screw zip drives, just use a CD-RW... Everyone has CD-ROMs... 2) There is an order-of-priortity in buying a laptop: A) Graphics: nVidia or go home.. Specifically GeForce4Go... ATI is ok (their software/drivers suck), but nVidia is still better... Avoid VIA, SIS, Savage, and especially Intel, Trident, and S3/SonicBlue. All of the above are absolute CRAP when it comes to graphics chips (not CPUs, GRAPHICS CHIPS)... B) RAM (self explanatory: bigger is better) C) CPU Speed (because if the first 2 aren't up to snuff, you can have a 10 Terragigamegahertz CPU and it won't make a bit of difference...) D) Hard Disk Size Add in a CDRW drive, and if the laptop has all of the above and is in your price range, go for it... Brand names are irrelevant, features are all that matter (since they're all made by the same 4 companies in Taiwan, anyhow... None of the big laptop brands in the USA actually builds computers, they just stick stickers)... Dell and Tosh are the two to look at, simply because they're the only ones (last I checked) offering GeForce4Go based laptops... Whatever you do, DO NOT BUY FROM A RETAILER (Retail-grade laptops are all crap. They have a huge processor coupled with the slowest graphics and RAM available, and the slowest large hard drive available)... Order direct. Also, I cannot stress how important the REST OF THE SYSTEM is when buying a PC. [b]PROCESSOR SPEED IS ONLY A SMALL PEICE OF THE PIE[/b], and if you say 'It has a X.Xghz CPU, hard drive, and DVD player, for $XXXX, let's buy it', you probably just bought something you'll regret... Go Dell or Toshiba. Do NOT buy a HPaq (HP/Compaq) or other retail-brand, as you will get a terrible graphics system, etc... And ignore the zip drive guy... I just got done with 4 & 1/3 yrs at an engineering school myself. There was not a single zip drive in any of the PC labs, as everyone either (a) used CDRWs, or more commonly (b) just used the network for everything... Zip disks are slow, expensive, and failure prone, not to mention almost extinct... My school instituted a mandatory laptop program the year after I got there, using Compaq machines... Talk about a mess (fortunately, I was grandfathered in, and didn't get forced to LEASE one from the school)... Trust me, you DO NOT want a HP or Compaq system... And as for the grad-student-halfway-around-the-world comment, send him an e-mail attachment... Network speed is much faster than a CDRW -OR- zip, and it doesn't cost the students anything (that's why where I went to school, we lived & died by the school LAN)...
Link Posted: 5/30/2003 8:11:12 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Dave_A: 2) There is an order-of-priortity in buying a laptop: A) Graphics: nVidia or go home.. Specifically GeForce4Go... ATI is ok (their software/drivers suck), but
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Dude she is a chick. She will not be playing games. Chicks love macs. Macs are very good machines. Macs are expensive. If you can afford a mac then get her one. Otherwise get a 600 dollar laptop that has a burner, and is somewhat upgradible.
Link Posted: 5/30/2003 9:20:05 PM EDT
Originally Posted By fearlessrogue:
Originally Posted By Dave_A: 2) There is an order-of-priortity in buying a laptop: A) Graphics: nVidia or go home.. Specifically GeForce4Go... ATI is ok (their software/drivers suck), but
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Dude she is a chick. She will not be playing games. Chicks love macs. Macs are very good machines. Macs are expensive. If you can afford a mac then get her one. Otherwise get a 600 dollar laptop that has a burner, and is somewhat upgradible.
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1) PC Laptops are never upgradable, except hard drive space and memory. 2) Even if you don't play games, a good video system is part of a good computer system. Video playback, weather DVDs, CAD, presentations, or games, it's all the same... Bad video = headaches. 3) Only buy a Mac if the school uses them. Macs are well built computers and finally have a good OS (BSD UNIX with an Apple UI... My mom bought one at my reccommendation), but it's a PC world in many places... Also, Apple is using guess-who's video chips in their current line... I've seen too many people have trouble with their computers because they bought cheap and got 'A fast CPU, with bad everything else'... If you get good guts, she will have less problems (even if she never uses the full potential of that video chip (i.e. games or agressive design/rendering software)... It's like buying a $30,000 car, and putting $50-per-wheel tires on it...
Link Posted: 5/30/2003 9:30:40 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 5/30/2003 9:33:22 PM EDT by NOVA5]
Originally Posted By Kharn: Nova5: Do you want to explain CD vs CDR vs CDRW and their varying abilities to write to a CD to a graduate student from the other side of the planet who doesnt even speak English beyond the basics of ordering a pizza? With Zips, if it doesnt fit in the hole, its not gonna work and everybody understands that concept. Kharn
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pretty easy. CD - 0 Writes. you get whats on it CDR - 4 possible writes, each reduces space for next. CDRW 255 Writes, all space each time. ZIP.. TRASH. Get off the Zipdrive train. its dead and gone. why not go superdisk? IBM still sells those, and you get to put them in the laptop bay! because.. THEY SUCK worse than ZIPS! I used to use zips, i still have a external SCSI zipdrive as well as the IDE one. are they in use? NO. why? CDRWs and CDRs have taken over. for my support data i use a external harddrive USB 2.0, i also have a huge cd folder for when the system doesnt have USB. ZIPS ARE DEAD.
Link Posted: 5/30/2003 9:31:48 PM EDT
Originally Posted By bung: NOVA5 just convinced me to sell all of my Apple products for superior Windows based machines. [rolleyes]
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Good.. now give them to me for range targets!
Link Posted: 5/30/2003 9:47:26 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 5/30/2003 9:48:43 PM EDT by Gloftoe]
Link Posted: 5/30/2003 9:53:50 PM EDT
The wireless card is important. I've started doing a lot of work in the library and at Borders or Starbucks, which all have wireless access. Most campuses are putting it in in public areas and many classrooms. The Zip drives are dying out. You can get a USB thumb drive in 128MB size and not have to worry whether the other guy has a zip drive. Just plug it into the port. If you need it on physical media burn a CD; the other guy is far more likely to have a CD drive. Floppy disks are also pretty much on their last legs. The Macs are a good choice for lots of stuff. They're excellent computer science boxes. They run Unix, and still have useful productivity software.
Link Posted: 5/31/2003 12:34:13 AM EDT
Find out what the school recommends. They may be behind the power curve and SURPRISE use Zip drives. Not everybody and everywhere is going to be on the cutting edge. It's too damn expensive and if an existing system/method is working. They don't want to change it. Places where not everybody is a self designated power user are usually a little behind. The cost to make incremental changes isn't worth it. Lets assume the uni has 2000 computers and a change takes 1 hour, thats a man-year of work. Also see what kind of deals the bookstore has. They may have decent hardware prices but academic buys on software are usually great. My wife just completed her Masters and when we got MS Office it was like $13.00 for the licensed disks If the machine doesn't have a several year warranty , this might be the time to look at one. Laptop displays are somewhat notorious for dying. Also the facts of life on theft might be a good lesson. Laptops walk often.
Link Posted: 5/31/2003 1:06:57 AM EDT
Get the good guts, Toshiba is a fairly reliable brand. As to Zip drives, I have two a 100M and a 250M sitting in my parts closet that I don't use. CDRW is the way to go.. I use lan/internet most often since I run my servers and have all the space I need. [bow] Get a good box and you won't regret it. Spend the money now and you won't spend it later repairing it. Go with Nvidia, best graphics chip around right now. AMD is the best CPU IMHO. That's all I use, hasn't let me down yet. Cheaper and generally runs better than Intel. Bigger screen, better graphics = less stress headaches.
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