Warning

 

Close

Confirm Action

Are you sure you wish to do this?

Confirm Cancel
Member Login
Posted: 5/17/2003 10:50:28 AM EDT
[url]http://www.aim.artinstitutes.edu/programdegrees.asp?pid=4&dtid=10&display=program[/url] my sister is considering going here
Link Posted: 5/18/2003 12:31:00 AM EDT
I have a suggestion- Tell her to FORGET the cooking/Baking school! They ARE NOT worth the money..espc the "big name" schools(Culinary institute of american, California Culintary Academy, etc) These schools costs $20,000 plus(in the case of the big name ones...try $50,000!), and YOU DON'T GET PAID MORE to start..you get the base pay NO MATTER!!! Granted you might advance faster, but almost all of the chefs I have worked for or have met(and I have met some big name chefs-Jacques pepin,"Iron Japanese" Chef Morimoto, my current head chef,Jan Birnbaum, who is a protegee' of Chef Paul Prodhomme.) have all said the same thing- take traning under a good chef/baker, read cookbooks, work in many places over the years, put some hard work in, and Put your heart into it!
Link Posted: 5/18/2003 12:38:34 AM EDT
I agree, Not that a culinary institute would hurt, but it doesn't help all that much. Being a chef is very much results oriented, if you put in the time (cleaning, chopping onions for endless hours, doing any crappy thing the kitchen manager tells you to, as the head chef doesn't run things that much in my experience) and work under someone with a good rep, you will do well. Being a chef is all about HARD work. The most important part is to build a good resume by working under multiple respected chefs so they can put a word in for you, & don't be afraid to bust your ass. It's like friggin boot camp.
Link Posted: 5/18/2003 6:15:40 AM EDT
that's what my gut reaction was when she first told me about it tough to tell her about it when she resents every bit of advice given by her older brother damn teenage women (and no I don't have a Pic [:D]
Link Posted: 5/18/2003 6:17:19 AM EDT
Originally Posted By Red_Beard: that's what my gut reaction was when she first told me about it tough to tell her about it when she resents every bit of advice given by her older brother damn teenage women (and no I don't have a Pic [:D]
View Quote
But is she hot?
Link Posted: 5/18/2003 7:09:08 AM EDT
no
Link Posted: 5/18/2003 7:40:01 AM EDT
Maybe a fluke or just good timing but my friends daughter went to one of the schools up near San Francisco. Out of school she got a high paying job for a hotel chain designing meals.
Link Posted: 5/18/2003 10:14:06 AM EDT
Atenico, you have one LUCKY person there! That is like the college grad that gets the one high paying job, while the rest are still in entry level jobs. Not saying cooking school is a fully negative thing, but they give you a line on how much you will get paid- and then the executive chef looks at you, laughs, and says "you have not much experience..you start at $8 an hour". Ohh..and you owe like $40K in school loans.
Link Posted: 5/18/2003 10:29:09 AM EDT
My daughter was seriously considering going to a culinary school when she graduated highschool. I called an old highschool aquaintence, Jan Birnbaum, who has a restraunt in California. TekChef works with him. He told me that it is a good line of work if you can get into a good restraunt but you have to remember a few things about the restraunt buisness. 1. It is a dangerous job. Sharp tools in constant use. Hot items being moved about. Hot surfaces. Slippery flooring most of the time. 2. Unless you are the head chef you get almost zero recognition for your accomplishments. Ask TekChef about this. 3. When all your friends are out socializing and having fun, that is when you have to be working. The wonderful brunches, lunches, and suppers that they enjoy is your peak worktime. 4. It's hard work! I wish your sister all the best in her search for a fulfilling career. Good luck.
Link Posted: 5/18/2003 10:38:51 AM EDT
I agree about the schools. If you notice that the majority of the most famous Chefs in the world have not attended culinary schools. Tell her to get a job at one of the top restaurants in the area working as a kitchen helper and move up from there. Let her show an interest and work hard and in a few years she will be earning a respectable living. If she works hard, in the same amount of time she spends in school, she can be several levels up on the people that attended one of the culinary schools. Plus, she can make connections and learn tricks that they never teach in school.
Link Posted: 5/18/2003 11:00:30 AM EDT
As another one in the industry-who did graduate from a culinary school-it won't get you more $$ right off the bat. Cooking schools will expose you to more product and technique than you will usually get in the outside world-but your paying for it. That said i tend to look for cooking school graduates when hiring although I prefer a few years out in the biz too so the person is tried and tested-no primadonna. The degree will also help in salary negotations once and if you get to that level. But it's all about hard work on your part...and the food. HTH, danny
Link Posted: 5/18/2003 5:33:33 PM EDT
There is an excellent culinary school in N.O. at Delgado Community College. Somewhat cheap to attend and churn out some quality chefs.
Link Posted: 5/18/2003 5:55:27 PM EDT
Link Posted: 5/18/2003 10:27:46 PM EDT
Im gonna have to go with TekChef on this one. I was accepted to Culinary Inst of America in Hyde Park NY and the BEST experience I had was working in NY restaurants and that was probably one of the BIGGEST stepping stones in my life. Last minute ...and I do mean LAST minute I decided NAHHHH... dont want to go to culinary school. Now instead of working out of refrigerators, I work on them. Tek Chef... One of the reasons I decided NOT to go was because of the lack of artistic latitude you have when working in a restaurant. Its more of "MOVE IT OUT!!! MOVE IT OUT NOW!" and that to me was pretty monotonous. Do you feel like that sometimes??? OH YEAH and one more thing... there was this one guy name "Ernesto" who started out as a dishwasher... when I last left the restaurant he moved up to prep cook, then to salads, then to grill man. Experience... thats what makes the $$$. School is great for theory. But 5 years after you are in the business... You basically know it.
Link Posted: 5/19/2003 1:00:32 AM EDT
Tek Chef... One of the reasons I decided NOT to go was because of the lack of artistic latitude you have when working in a restaurant. Its more of "MOVE IT OUT!!! MOVE IT OUT NOW!" and that to me was pretty monotonous. Do you feel like that sometimes??? It does get to me sometimes...you are basically a worker untill you hit the level of ability that you are a Exec Chef or Sous-chef(second in charge). Befoer that, you do things the chef tells you to do, and if he/she is a good teacher, you learn why it works. I am lucky that I have had two chefs-Dan Berman(Mixx, Santa Rosa, CA), and chef Jan(Catahoula, Calistoga, CA), who want you to learn and ask questions.(I also feel lucky as Chef Jan is well known in the industry, and when I move on, he will make phone calls..if I go to New Orleans, I could be in Paul Prodhomme's kitchen!) I recently started taking pastry shifts...now that is some creative, painstaking work! I actually like pastry a bit more than cooking. The only thing I love more than cooking is doing audio mixing..and that is just about as bad as this industry..soo...I am staying!
Link Posted: 5/19/2003 4:55:11 AM EDT
My daughter-in-laws husband went through the CIAs bakery program in the early 1990s. He eventually ended up in the R&D dept with Wynnstar flavorings in NJ. He does some really cool things with flavorings and makes a 6 figure salary with hefty annual bonuses.
Top Top