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Posted: 5/16/2003 2:01:30 PM EDT
Still haven't gotten an engineering job and it sucks. Keep telling myself it is the economy but I am starting to wonder. I want to tap the expertise of the AR-15 crew to see if my resume sucks. If it sucks ass I can try to fix it, if not it looks like I am school bound again. So please offer your suggestions, getting sick of poverty! Note: the name and address has been changed to protect the guilty. Also the formatting isn't exactly right, lost it in the translation. Gorto 223 Stoner Dr. Someplace MN, 55042 651-762-3006 Gorto@ar15.com QUALIFICATIONS SUMMARY · Plastic extrusion and blown film experience with LLD polyethylene. ·Proficient with Instron tensile testing machines. ·Proficient with SMART, Lotus Notes, Microsoft Excel, Word, and PowerPoint. ·Knowledge and experience with SEM and TEM operation. · Strong work ethic and willingness to work hard to achieve set goals. EXPERIENCE 2002 - Present On Assignment: Lab Support, Technician for Guidant. St. Paul, MN ·Operates Instron 5560 electromechanical testing machine. ·Manages test request information with SMART software. ·Communicates with engineers to optimize testing techniques. ·Triage incoming test requests to maximize efficiency of materials and time usage. 2001 - 2002 On Assignment: Lab Support, Technician for Dyneon. Oakdale, MN ·Worked in Specialty Additives Applications and Product Development group testing polymer processing aids their applications. ·Operated an experimental scale blown film line. ·Compounded Polymer Processing Aid masterbatches in a twin screw extruder. ·Maintained and calibrated extruders through screenpack exchanges, heater band replacements, die ring replacements, adjusting die pin concentricity and measuring die pin erosion. ·Managed blown film line computerized data acquisition system. ·Supplemented fluorothermoplastics personnel with extruder operation, setup, and maintenance. ·Presented Polymer Processing Aid test results during a company wide meeting. 1999 - 2001 Student Hazardous Waste Technician, Department of Environmental Health and Safety, Hazardous Waste Division. Minneapolis, MN ·On-site packaging and compliance troubleshooter for Integrated Waste Management facility. ·Perform on-site unknown chemical testing in Chemistry department to categorize waste by hazard class via wet chemical testing methods. ·Envoy between the Integrated Waste Management Facility personnel and the Chemistry Department personnel to resolve conflicts and communications problems. ·Jr. Scientist Trainee status from lab experience. EDUCATION 1997 - 2001 B.S. Materials Science and Engineering University of Minnesota. Minneapolis, MN ·GPA 3.30 INTERESTS ·Include aviation history and synthetic gem growth. MEMBERSHIPS ·American Ceramics Society ·Materials Research Society
Link Posted: 5/16/2003 2:06:23 PM EDT
Well if I was a boss I'd hire ya! Sounds like you have good experience. I like how you are specific about what you are proficient with. The largest problem I see with resumes is that they speculate at what they would be good at, are not specific, and generalize too much. You've got the experience. No worries, you'll find a job. I just couldn't find anything that I thought wrong or incorrect with it. I know that's what you're looking for, but I like it.
Link Posted: 5/16/2003 2:10:03 PM EDT
I would put education first, then experience, and also elaborate on your education a little bit (any projects, awards, extracirriculars, thesis, special skills developed). This might make you more broadly marketable since you just graduated 2 years ago. It's hard to analyze it aesthetically too, given the bulletin board format. If you have any friends in advertising, HR, graphic design, or any that are gay interior decorators, have them critique the layout and fonts.
Link Posted: 5/16/2003 2:18:12 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 5/16/2003 2:18:42 PM EDT by Delta_3_63]
Originally Posted By dbrowne1: gay interior decorators
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Isn't that redundant? [i]edited because I'm so stooopid![/i]
Link Posted: 5/16/2003 2:20:03 PM EDT
Looks good, but what about references? When we get a resume in, everyone looks at it and asks, "who is this guy? Anyone ever heard of him? Is he worth a shit?" Then we flip to the back page - the references - and see if we recognize any of them. We have been in the non-hiring mode for several years, but it is easy to pick up the phone and call someone you recognize and get the scoop on the guy. When I pick up the phone when someone is checking references, one question that stands out is "Does this guy get along with everyone?" Noone asks for a GPA. The two times I was job hunting in my feild, I dropped all the names I could think of. Those who say not to drop names are not job hunting. Are you involved with a professional group? The Alaska Miner's Association gets together for breakfast every friday morning and chatters about politics and about the industry scene. Lots of opportunities to meet important folks. I am sure your industry has something similar. A friend from school got hired when someone recognized her name from volunteering at a booth at a national convention. Yeah, it is brutal out there, and you have to go the extra mile. Working part time allows you to really put in the effort. As an engineer, it will be expected of you in the first place, so consider it OJT.
Link Posted: 5/16/2003 2:35:17 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 5/16/2003 2:44:11 PM EDT by TomJefferson]
Link Posted: 5/16/2003 2:35:25 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 5/16/2003 2:42:19 PM EDT by TXSunDvl]
I would try to put on the resume what I accomplished in my various positions, rather than job duties. A listing of job duties is rather boring. For example, rather than saying "Supervised four people", say "Coordinated the activities of four subordinates to ensure the efficient and effective completion of departmental responsibilities." Saw TJ's post after I wrote this. It's pretty much what I was saying above. Also, remove the Interests section. Personal info will generally never help in gaining an interview, but often will result in having a resume rejected.
Link Posted: 5/16/2003 2:37:20 PM EDT
It's probably good you don't have listed under interests that you are a member of an online radical gun group called ar15.com
Link Posted: 5/16/2003 2:56:06 PM EDT
One thing my ex-boss was anal about was continuing education. Even one night course looked great to him. ED
Link Posted: 5/16/2003 3:55:42 PM EDT
I don't think your resume sells you very well. When I'm looking at a resume, I don't want to see someone who is "proficient" or has "knowledge and experience" in their field. I want someone who knows their stuff inside and out! I want a badass! Would you want a proficient plumber? Or a mechanic who has some knowledge and experience with your car? I want the best god-damned plumber there ever was, and my mechanic better be the highest trained specialist that knows every detail of my car and has seen every possible thing that can go wrong with em'. No plumber or mechanic would sell himself any other way, and neither should you. Your resume is an ad for your services, and you should treat it as such. TomJefferson's advice is good, as you need to show how your past experience is going to help me (the employer)make money. Try stronger wording, and don't be shy! Things like "EXTENSIVE, HANDS-ON experience" and being "HIGHLY proficient" can do wonders to spice up a resume, and inspire confidence. Don't manage things, be IN CHARGE of them! You didn't just "maintain and calibrate extruders" you were RESPONSIBLE FOR AND OVERSAW ALL ASPECTS of extruders. You get the idea. Hope this helps, and good luck on your search!
Link Posted: 5/16/2003 4:17:45 PM EDT
Would you consider relocating? There are literally tons of jobs requiring an engineering degree in the Washington DC area and surrounding 'burbs from the "Dulles Corridor" all the way down to Richmond. Some are government at the labs such as Dahlgren and some are for DoD contractors. I know Naval Surface Warfare Center, Dahlgren is looking for new engineers of many stripes. There are also other locales where the big guys are desperate to put the habeus grabbus on young engineers...such as... SAIC in the Northern VA area and in Norfolk (AMSEC Subsidiary) Northrop Grumman all over our area and in Pascagoula, MS working on a brand new super techno-freak "stealth" ship with totally state of the art stuff (I'm currently working a "Star Trek" radar for that vessel.) Lockheed Martin all over the country. Boeing in our area, in Kalifornistan, in St. Louis and of course in Seattle. Boeing might be very interested in your materials experience, especially in their Ballistic Missile Defense program, since they use all sort of exotics in their missiles and they have to know what an enemy puts on the nosecones of his ICBMs. Can you get a secret clearance? If you can move...send me an IM and I'll provide more info. Good Luck!
Link Posted: 5/16/2003 5:12:46 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 5/16/2003 6:50:26 PM EDT by Winston_Wolf]
... Alright [b]Gorto[/b], you asked for it. … Take this as constructive criticism from a disciplinarian father. Not as a put down because you are qualified for an entry position. First, it reads like a list. If I wanted a list I'd ask my office assistance to draft one up. You had better be proficient in MS Office tools; you’re an Engineer for goodness sakes! If applicable, let me know about your experience at writing code, developing algorithms, use of computational or analytical tools, CAD/CAM/CAE or data mining. If you really are proficient at Excel, let them know that you’re an expert mathematician. Tell me more about polymers and engineering / scientific advancements you’ve made or contributed to, don’t list machines. Let them know that you're aware of, and on top of the latest advancements in the Industry. If anything, only identify the top level ISO9001 or AS9100 standards you are familiar working with, you know, those that they conduct business by. Let me know that you are a thorough statistician and that you exploit the “tools of the trade” for maximum efficiency and output. Explain in detail, a bit more, about your experience acting as liaison on behalf of senior engineering staff. Can I call these guys about you? Let your prospect employer know what you are going to do for the Company to reduce costs, enable research and development projects. Sell yourself. Let me know that you conduct business from a leadership posture and only seek management help as influence to get the job complete on time and on target with budget. What have you contributed to the engineering societies you belong to other than dues? Show me some of your work. Have you published or co-authored any papers. Offer to work for free for 30 days (no one really does that but it gives the appearance of sincerity) until you’ve proven your capabilities. Research the heck out of the Company you’re going to interview with, you better know something about them. Lastly, let your potential employers KNOW without doubt, that YOU are the best candidate for the position. ... Good luck! Good engineering jobs are seldom advertised in the local paper. Go sniff them out. Consider job-shopping (contracting) by checking out CE weekly but be ready to travel if your looking for rates over $50/hour. … Keep your chin high and never worry about taking on a junior position, if you’re as good as you say you’ll be running the show before long. … Remember, the Industry is looking for leadership foremost. So lead!
Link Posted: 5/16/2003 5:34:27 PM EDT
Link Posted: 5/16/2003 8:04:55 PM EDT
Originally Posted By TomJefferson: Winston's is a good post. I read your resume like you were seeking an entry level position. I would recommend writing a couple resume's for what type of job you are seeking. I write mine specific around the job I am seeking and company being sent to.
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... So true. You should have piles of files, each tailored to different Companies. Only one template though.
Link Posted: 5/17/2003 3:00:13 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 5/17/2003 3:03:44 AM EDT by TomJefferson]
Link Posted: 5/17/2003 10:33:53 AM EDT
Originally Posted By TomJefferson: The biggest mistake people make in looking for work is no followup. Even if the HR director has you in the maybe pile, a call every week checking on the status may just get it off her desk and onto someones who cares.
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That right there is the TRUTH! I put in for a job, did the writen, oral. Never heard back. [b]I[/b] called every week for 3 weeks. Finally had a interview with another place. On the way back I thought I'd stop in at the P.D. and see about them. They told me they had been trying to get ahold of me for the last 3 weeks to hire me. Got the job that day. Thankfully I never gave up on it. ED
Link Posted: 5/17/2003 11:07:02 AM EDT
Yeah - effective followup. Part of my problem is that prospective employers are remote and keep little more than a secretary in town to pick up the mail. I applied for one job I really wanted, and the guy I was going to interveiw with got fired. One of many, for cause or as a scapegoat. I called again a few times, but noone there had heard of me. :) At least one of those times I called, I spoke to the guy they wanted to replace with me. About 3 years later the project collapsed. I told the story to a guy who worked there, and he said the HR guy was told to hire me but all my contact info disappeared and that I never called back to inquire!
Link Posted: 5/17/2003 12:28:43 PM EDT
Pretty good advice so far. More use of superlatives (rather than "proficient"). Also, I would keep a separate reference list (on the same type of paper and letterhead as the resume, but not part of it), and include it with any "blind" mailings. Pick 3-4 references and include a short description of who they are and how they know you under each name. A good, customized coverletter is also key - figure out what the company does, what they're hiring for, and adjust appropriately (highlight your relevant experience and interests). In other words, don't just do a mail merge. Carry extra resumes, references, etc. with you to interviews, along with anything else that is relevant (for me that would be law school transcript and writing sample). And always send thank you letters to people that interview you, even if you don't like them.
Link Posted: 5/18/2003 1:08:30 PM EDT
Thanks for all of the info, I have been busy as heck with some visitors from out of town this weekend so I will post some replies to the above posts tonight. Thanks, Gorto
Link Posted: 5/19/2003 3:14:20 PM EDT
Originally Posted By pogo: Looks good, but what about references? When we get a resume in, everyone looks at it and asks, "who is this guy? Anyone ever heard of him? Is he worth a shit?" Then we flip to the back page - the references - and see if we recognize any of them. We have been in the non-hiring mode for several years, but it is easy to pick up the phone and call someone you recognize and get the scoop on the guy. When I pick up the phone when someone is checking references, one question that stands out is "Does this guy get along with everyone?" Noone asks for a GPA. The two times I was job hunting in my field, I dropped all the names I could think of. Those who say not to drop names are not job hunting. Are you involved with a professional group? The Alaska Miner's Association gets together for breakfast every Friday morning and chatters about politics and about the industry scene. Lots of opportunities to meet important folks. I am sure your industry has something similar. A friend from school got hired when someone recognized her name from volunteering at a booth at a national convention. Yeah, it is brutal out there, and you have to go the extra mile. Working part time allows you to really put in the effort. As an engineer, it will be expected of you in the first place, so consider it OJT.
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I was always told that it was "references available upon request" and they would ask if they wanted them. Is it SOP to send references out with resumes? I should see if I could get involved with MRS or ACERS...
Link Posted: 5/19/2003 3:20:55 PM EDT
Originally Posted By jadams951: It's probably good you don't have listed under interests that you are a member of an online radical gun group called ar15.com
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And how!
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