Warning

 

Close

Confirm Action

Are you sure you wish to do this?

Confirm Cancel
Member Login
Posted: 5/9/2003 3:36:25 PM EDT
Whenever I buy tires, I get them balanced. Last time, I noticed that the shop I used to trust, not only overtightened using their impact gun in spite of my instrictions to 'hand tighten", they also used a bubble balancer. The spin balancing method seems far superior to me, if the equipment is good. However, this is a front wheel drive vehicle. I believe there at least USED to be equipment that does spin balancing with the wheel off the vehicle & mounted on the machine ( in a cage, I hope) Do any of the big tire shops do it this way? Which ones?
Link Posted: 5/9/2003 3:40:33 PM EDT
Link Posted: 5/9/2003 3:42:43 PM EDT
Link Posted: 5/9/2003 4:11:38 PM EDT
Like they say if you want it done right do it yourself[:D] Did the guy use a torque stick? They look like extensions but are funky colored like yellow green just to name a few. These sticks limit the power of an impact gun to a specific torque. Not as good as a torque wrench but close enough for wheels. Bubble balance is fine for most applications. Thats the only way I balance tires I mount myself. However all the tires I pay to have mounted are spun balanced. And the only reason for that is I have had bad luck with Equal and I have never seen a bubble balancer that will do a 10R22.5 and you would have to have one hell of a back to set one of those on a bubble machine they whiegh well over 100lbs
Link Posted: 5/9/2003 5:45:05 PM EDT
10R22.5s? you a tractor/trailer mechanic? I haven't done one of those in years. As a person who has probably mounted and balanced over 1000 tires I have to say spin balancing is better. As for impacting the wheels one I am guilty of that myself. I would feel for the poor guy having to mount tires all day torquing the lugnuts by hand. But also understand your point. Oh, spin balancing is much quicker and personally I can't imagine any even semi modern shop still using a bubble balancer.
Link Posted: 5/9/2003 6:20:54 PM EDT
Spin them for the price. If you feel it in a few months, go back. They will see what is wrong. Good maintence will save you problems. I had a front right tire acting odd. I thought it was needing attention. It was .5 oz off (LEAD WT) on a 15 " truck rim. Fixed it and it was sweet after that.
Link Posted: 5/9/2003 11:04:52 PM EDT
The tightening issue comes from stuff like wanting to be able to change a flat without forcing the car off the jack, which was an issue once. Then also, each vehicle we've taken to that place has had the front rotors repaced at some time or another due to warping. I'm no Atlas, but once I broke a 4-way (OK, it was not hand welded) trying to break one loose, and another time the manager at Goodyear wouldn't beileve in the "overtightened" concept until he was jumping on a piece of pipe he'd added to his 18" breaker bar.
Link Posted: 5/9/2003 11:11:54 PM EDT
Originally Posted By prk: The tightening issue comes from stuff like wanting to be able to change a flat without forcing the car off the jack, which was an issue once. Then also, each vehicle we've taken to that place has had the front rotors repaced at some time or another due to warping. I'm no Atlas, but once I broke a 4-way (OK, it was not hand welded) trying to break one loose, and another time the manager at Goodyear wouldn't beileve in the "overtightened" concept until he was jumping on a piece of pipe he'd added to his 18" breaker bar.
View Quote
Hmm try breaking the lug nuts loose before jacking the car up. But ya, I hate that overtightening crap. I actually busted off a lug bolt one time because it was misthreaded on very tightly with an impact wrench. I was pretty pissed.
Link Posted: 5/10/2003 1:26:54 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 5/10/2003 10:43:54 AM EDT by SocomCen]
A lot of warped rotors is from overtighning the lugs. After I have mine balanced I check them with a torque wrench. I like a dynamic spin balance the best (weights on boths sides of the wheels). I hear the road force balancers are really good at checking if tires are bad etc. I think these are the Hunter 9700 machines. Edited to add: the warped rotors info is directly from Pat Goss of PBS' Motorweek and host of Goss' Garage on 106.7 FM in the DC area on the weekends. He also owns his own garage in Seabrook Maryland named Goss' Carworld (and he's a frequent guest on G. Gordon Liddys radio show).
Link Posted: 5/10/2003 1:44:57 AM EDT
Standard torque for most car lug nuts is 100 foot pounds. The average impact wrench has to be held on the lug nut and hammered away for a few seconds to get it that tight. So it probably isnt overtightened in most cases. Always check the torque with a torque wrench or you risk ruining or losing a wheel. Having it loose enough so its easy to turn off means its easy to come loose too. Warped rotors are caused by heavy braking with wet rotors or rotors that have been turned and then are too thin and warp easily.
Link Posted: 5/10/2003 6:07:48 AM EDT
Those computer controlled off-vehicle wheel balancers are the best. They balance both statically and dynamically. I haven't seen any bubble type balancers in at least 20 years.
Link Posted: 5/10/2003 8:02:28 AM EDT
I thought the way to go was with the "Hunter Road-Force Balncer" machine. The Hunter Alignment Machine did a great job on my vehicle. GunLvr
Link Posted: 5/10/2003 8:37:14 AM EDT
Originally Posted By Guntoter: Warped rotors are caused by heavy braking with wet rotors or rotors that have been turned and then are too thin and warp easily.
View Quote
I hate to tell you this, but that is only partially correct. The problem occurred primarily in ford family of vehicles when they were using 2 piece rotors. It is also recommended that all hubbed rotors (where the rotor itself is part of the wheel hub and doesn't just slip over the studs) not be impact applied. I will not accept bubble balancing at all and don't even think about going any where near my car with an impact wrench. There is a right way and a wrong way to do things. Spin balancing and torque wrench are the right way.
Top Top