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Posted: 5/9/2003 6:10:50 AM EDT
1919 Victorian. [img]http://pictures.gsmls.com/MediaDisplay/hr1652415-1.jpg[/img] It's in great shape. Has a lots of nice details.
Link Posted: 5/9/2003 6:13:50 AM EDT
Congrats... We just bought a new-construction house about 5 months ago... all the charm and character of an operating room. Happy wife = happy life, I guess. You cannot beat the detail and charm of an older home.
Link Posted: 5/9/2003 6:22:23 AM EDT
Very nice bro! Congrats! [beer]
Link Posted: 5/9/2003 6:23:38 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 5/9/2003 6:24:39 AM EDT by Cincinnatus]
Radiators hissing Floors and stairs creaking Whole house groaning and settling as it cools at night. I like old houses. I don't think we'll move in until August, though.
Link Posted: 5/9/2003 6:25:35 AM EDT
After growing up in "classic" homes from time to time, I am proud of my "operating room" new construct I had built a couple of years ago. However, I can appreciate some of the fine details that used to go into the homes from "way back when". I was recently visiting someone who has a house from the late 1800s and it was beautiful.
Link Posted: 5/9/2003 6:38:01 AM EDT
I Love old houses. One of my favorite things about them are natural woodwork. I Love The big elaborate carved wood, pocket doors,oak bannisters and steps. Cincinnatus were you lucky enough to get this kind of setup??
Link Posted: 5/9/2003 6:54:39 AM EDT
Nice details include: Built in pantry, cabinets and drawers located on each floor, in the hallway. Dark oak bookcases builtinto the wall, on either side of the fireplace on the first floor. Leaded glass windows. My favorite is a fireplace down in the basement, next to the workroom.
Link Posted: 5/9/2003 6:56:17 AM EDT
Originally Posted By Cincinnatus: Nice details include: Built in pantry, cabinets and drawers located on each floor, in the hallway. Dark oak bookcases builtinto the wall, on either side of the fireplace on the first floor. Leaded glass windows. My favorite is a fireplace down in the basement, next to the workroom.
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[size=4][b]SWEET![/size=4][/b]
Link Posted: 5/9/2003 7:02:41 AM EDT
Great house. That would run about $650k in my neck of the woods.
Link Posted: 5/9/2003 7:05:33 AM EDT
not too bad! good job!
Link Posted: 5/9/2003 7:10:37 AM EDT
Beautiful Foursquare with Arts and Crafts detailing! Congrats, and may I introduce you to a wonderful magazine resource, Old House Journal? We have been restoring Victorian homes for most of our 32 married years together and have found this magazine to be incredibly useful, in both an aesthetic and a practical sense. Not just another cutesy decorating rag, but actual "how-I-did-it" hands-on info in there. Very pretty, and I hope you have years of happiness in it!
Link Posted: 5/9/2003 7:11:42 AM EDT
[hail] Nice house. My wife would kill for that porch. How is the street traffic ?
Link Posted: 5/9/2003 7:11:51 AM EDT
Congrats! [beer] I bought an 1886 colonial 2 years ago and I'm still renovating....[banghead] I love old houses, but I wish I had the money to buy one that needed less work. It's my first house so I guess I had to start somewhere.....
Link Posted: 5/9/2003 7:25:14 AM EDT
Nice. Contact me before you change anything with the older heating system or add AC. I am fairly good at designing systems for loder homes that actually work without destroying the charm and ambiance of creaking cast iron radiators. A little work on the porch posts and rail and you got it knocked. Man they used to REALLY build 'em.
Link Posted: 5/9/2003 7:29:11 AM EDT
Very nice man. Well kept looking too. Congrats!
Link Posted: 5/9/2003 7:30:10 AM EDT
Very nice. Looks like it's in good shape outside. What's the effort inside? After we bought the church building in October and started renovating it into a house, we've spent a king's ransom at Lowes.
Link Posted: 5/9/2003 7:32:37 AM EDT
Wow nice looking place. Congrads. I've seen more than my share of "This Old House" episodes on KCET the local PBS affiliate. The amount of detail in the wood working is not seen in more modern houses. The true lathe & plaster, where they use real lathes and not just button board, the electrical wiring works of art.
Link Posted: 5/9/2003 7:53:38 AM EDT
Street traffic is low. It is right next door to a decent elementary school. Interior is in good shape (except for some hideous faux-finish sponge painting). The garage looks like it might fall over [:)]. And there's a giant Maple tree that's growing about 2" from the edge of the roof. All in all, I'm pretty psyched. It's bigger than it looks, and I like that in a house. I don't like miniature versions of larger homes. It is what it is.
Link Posted: 5/9/2003 8:03:33 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 5/9/2003 8:04:05 AM EDT by DK-Prof]
Cincinnatus - nice house! Congratulations [BEER]
Originally Posted By Hannah_Reitsch: Beautiful Foursquare with Arts and Crafts detailing! Congrats, and may I introduce you to a wonderful magazine resource, Old House Journal? We have been restoring Victorian homes for most of our 32 married years together and have found this magazine to be incredibly useful, in both an aesthetic and a practical sense. Not just another cutesy decorating rag, but actual "how-I-did-it" hands-on info in there. Very pretty, and I hope you have years of happiness in it!
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Hannah, you rule!! I was just sitting here trying to think of a birthday present for my fiancee (yeah I know, ar15.com probably isn't the best place for that [:)] ), and a subsciption to that magazine is a fantastic idea! Her house is a 1928 bungalow in the English Cottage (similar to Tudor Revival) style, and she LOVES it. That magazine sound perfect because she's panning some remodeling and upgrading. [img]http://www.olin.wustl.edu/faculty/langfred/house5.jpg[/img]
Link Posted: 5/9/2003 8:18:58 AM EDT
I used to love old houses. Then I bought an 1877 Victorian cottage. [banghead] I hope yours proves less troublesome.
Link Posted: 5/9/2003 9:31:39 AM EDT
Originally Posted By ruido: Congrats! [beer] I bought an 1886 colonial 2 years ago and I'm still renovating....[banghead] I love old houses, but I wish I had the money to buy one that needed less work. It's my first house so I guess I had to start somewhere.....
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No such thing as an 1886 Colonial. Colonials ceased to be in around 1783, at which point it transitions to the Federal period which quickly transitioned to the neo-classical period (Monticello and most of D.C.) The Romantic period follows. You get Colonial Revival in the 19th century, roughly co-existant with the Victorian and Edwardian periods. That's where your 1886 house would fall. In modern usage, "Colonial" has been attached by realtors to just about anything that is not a "ranch," "Cape," "Victorian" or "Contemporary." However, the two to two and a half storied box-type house (typically eight rooms (4 per floor) with 1 or two internal chimneys is an incredibly efficient house style and easy to build, so it has survived. My wife and I are buying a 1790 federal period "Colonial" style house. 13 acres. I can't put up a phot YET.
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