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Posted: 11/12/2002 7:59:03 AM EDT
Link Posted: 11/12/2002 8:07:47 AM EDT
Link Posted: 11/12/2002 8:12:38 AM EDT
Here's some info. from Popular Mechanics... [url]http://popularmechanics.com/popmech/homei/9803HIHIAM.html[/url]
Link Posted: 11/12/2002 8:20:05 AM EDT
You should get a circuit transfer switch wich can usually be bought from lage generator suppliers or you may try Home Depot or Lowes.
Link Posted: 11/12/2002 8:59:39 AM EDT
Using the popular mechanics link as an installation guide and my service rate of $68.00 an hour for the first hr. and pro-rata from then on, my service men can do a basic generator panel hook-up in approx 4-5 hours for around $450.00. That includes miscellaneous material and you buying the generator panel yourself. Rates in your area may differ greatly. [:)]
Link Posted: 11/12/2002 9:17:46 AM EDT
How often do you have power outages? If it is only once in a while you could do what my dad did for years. He made an extension cord with male plug on both ends. When the power would go out he would turn the main braker off then plug the extension cord into the generator and an outlet. This allowed him to backfeed the system. He could tell when the power came back on from the light they left on in the garage which has it's own main panel.
Link Posted: 11/12/2002 9:41:02 AM EDT
I hardly ever use mine so here is what I do. Make a sign that says TURN OFF MAIN BREAKER. Then I wired a extension cord with two 220 volt male plug. Attach the sign to the extension cord My Box has a lock on it so after I turn off the main breaker I lock it. Then I turn off all the other circuits. make sure everything in the house is turned off on the circuits you are going to power up. Start generator,let it run for a couple of minutes. Connect extension cord to the 220 volt outlet the other end to the 220 out of the GEN. I use the compressor outlet in the garage because it is on its own circuit. Turn the breaker on for the 220 outlet the Gen. is on and then start one by one turning on the NEEDED circuits. Do not over load. YOU CAN KILL A LINEMAN IF YOU DO THIS WRONG!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!­!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!­!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!­!!!!!!!!
Link Posted: 11/12/2002 10:03:11 AM EDT
Link Posted: 11/12/2002 10:22:31 AM EDT
This is not something that should be attempted by an amateur. Get a licensed electrician to do this work. It is alot more dangerous than installing a ceiling fan or wiring a 110v outlet. Not everything is a do-it-yourself project, no matter what PM or Home Depot says.
Link Posted: 11/12/2002 10:36:04 AM EDT
YOU CAN KILL A LINEMAN IF YOU DO THIS WRONG
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I had a friend that was killed when someone backfed power to the power transformer (company owned that connected them to the power company). Since the power company's wires had just been disconnected from the transformer, he assumed it was safe. It was a simple job. They were moving the transformer to a taller pad (to get themselves a little more protection in case of a flood) about five feet away. If you put-out 220V back to the power company, it goes through a transformer and comes-out the other end at many times that voltage! Please get a transfer switch. It's also easier to switch back and forth, and it's safer. Also, with a good transfer switch (with clear instructions and markings), it's very easy to wire it up yourself. I've done three for friends and two here at work.z
Link Posted: 11/12/2002 10:38:41 AM EDT
Link Posted: 11/12/2002 11:09:33 AM EDT
Beer_Slayer, Find a local electrician who does a little side work and he should be able to help you A LOT cheaper than an electrical company will. Also, the reason you don't backfeed the power to the power lines isn't to save a line worker, it's so you won't destroy your generator when they turn the power back on. J (electrician extraordinaire for 9 years)
Link Posted: 11/12/2002 11:19:25 AM EDT
Originally Posted By thebeekeeper1:
Originally Posted By u-baddog: I hardly ever use mine so here is what I do. Make a sign that says TURN OFF MAIN BREAKER. Then I wired a extension cord with two 220 volt male plug. Attach the sign to the extension cord. My Box has a lock on it so after I turn off the main breaker I lock it. Then I turn off all the other circuits. make sure everything in the house is turned off on the circuits you are going to power up. Start generator,let it run for a couple of minutes. Connect extension cord to the 220 volt outlet the other end to the 220 out of the GEN. I use the compressor outlet in the garage because it is on its own circuit. Turn the breaker on for the 220 outlet the Gen. is on and then start one by one turning on the NEEDED circuits. Do not over load. [red]YOU CAN KILL A LINEMAN IF YOU DO THIS WRONG!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!­!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!­!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!­!!!!!!!![/red]
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I knew of this, and your warning is exactly why I didn't pass it on. I'm not sure it should remain here. Bad [i]ju ju[/i] written all over it. [:O]
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Some people would say the same about ar15.com [:O] yet we still dispense information because we trust that person on the other side to act appropriately. The person who told/showed me how to do this is a VA Power lineman. There are plenty of board members who are competent and will have no problem following the instructions as written. Safety applies to all things that can kill or maim , not just firearms. [b]If you are not sure, hire a pro. [/b] YOU COULD KILL A LINEMAN !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!­!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
Link Posted: 11/12/2002 11:30:13 AM EDT
Originally Posted By H357SIGK: Beer_Slayer, Find a local electrician who does a little side work and he should be able to help you A LOT cheaper than an electrical company will. Also, the reason you don't backfeed the power to the power lines isn't to save a line worker, it's so you won't destroy your generator when they turn the power back on. J (electrician extraordinaire for 9 years)
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If the main circuit is open why would the power being turned back on harm the generator ? If a lineman is working on a isolated line trying to get power restored and you energize that circuit by incorrectly back feeding your home the lineman could be shocked if he was in contact with the line. Unless he was treating the line like it was live.
Link Posted: 11/12/2002 5:19:52 PM EDT
Originally Posted By u-baddog:
Originally Posted By H357SIGK: Beer_Slayer, Find a local electrician who does a little side work and he should be able to help you A LOT cheaper than an electrical company will. Also, the reason you don't backfeed the power to the power lines isn't to save a line worker, it's so you won't destroy your generator when they turn the power back on. J (electrician extraordinaire for 9 years)
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If the main circuit is open why would the power being turned back on harm the generator ? If a lineman is working on a isolated line trying to get power restored and you energize that circuit by incorrectly back feeding your home the lineman could be shocked if he was in contact with the line. Unless he was treating the line like it was live.
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You are correct if done wrong can fry the man down the line AND the generator! So just do it right! Bob [:D]
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