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Posted: 11/1/2002 11:29:58 AM EDT
I like the flat-top due to cheek weld when using scopes and tactical red dot sights, but why do so many flat top receivers still have the front site post? Doesn't it get in the way of your line of sight? It would seem to me that if you go the flat-top route, that you'd be better off getting no front site post, or having one of the gas block picatinny rails. Opinions?
Link Posted: 11/1/2002 11:35:42 AM EDT
It disappears, because your point of focus is different. It bothers some people, but most don't notice that it's even there. Cabby
Link Posted: 11/1/2002 11:41:41 AM EDT
Hmm, weird - you'd think that with that big old piece of metal right in front of the objective lens on a scope, or with how small and low those red dot optics are, that it would get in the way.
Link Posted: 11/1/2002 11:41:57 AM EDT
It bothered me, so I got a handle mounted scope.
Link Posted: 11/1/2002 11:49:57 AM EDT
I put a Leupold 3-9X40 Vari-X II on a Colt 16" flattop with fixed front sight assembly. [b]I cannot see even a shadow of the front sight assembly[/b]. Doesn't matter whether it's on 3 or 9 power, nothing. I've heard a lot might have to do with the quality of the optic, so YMMV.
Link Posted: 11/1/2002 12:12:06 PM EDT
It does get in the way, but it is way out of focus. Since the objective mirror is far larger than your pupil, it is able to "bend" light around the obstruction and make it appear "see-thru". How's that for a 4 year-old explanation. It's the same thing you see when you look at a shadow caused by a large lightsource. Look at the shadow cast by your hand under a florescent light. It is soft, because the light is only partially obscured by your hand in the area of the shadow. It works the same way with your front sight. Scopes tend to vary on this.
Link Posted: 11/1/2002 12:23:03 PM EDT
Torf, Good explanation. GW2112, You will see the Front sight with a red dot that has no magnification. However, if you use the proper red dot technique of leaving both eyes open, the red dot will just be superimposed on the image from the 'nonscoped'eye. ex- if you are looking through the red dot scope with your right eye, but you keep your left eye open, the image of the red dot will be superimpose onto the clear image from the left eye. This works well as long as the target is farther than like 5 feet away from the muzzle.
Link Posted: 11/1/2002 9:16:22 PM EDT
Generally not a problem – though it can depend on your optics and/or how high they are mounted. A while back, I put a low mounted 1.5 power ACOG on a flat top and the triangular aiming point wound up on the front sight tower, which wasn’t going to work! Luckily, I had a removable front sight - otherwise I would have needed a higher mount. My basic problem was that the low power of the ACOG resulted in the sight tower being pretty much in focus!
Link Posted: 11/1/2002 9:22:28 PM EDT
Link Posted: 11/2/2002 1:19:59 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 11/2/2002 1:21:04 AM EDT by SeaDweller]
I used to see the front site on the flat-top Bushy utilizing my Aimpoint 5000 2X.
Link Posted: 11/2/2002 4:27:33 AM EDT
It certainly bothers/annoys me.That's why my 2 Armalites are the A4 configuration.
Link Posted: 11/2/2002 5:09:23 AM EDT
Originally Posted By Greywolf2112: I like the flat-top due to cheek weld when using scopes and tactical red dot sights, but why do so many flat top receivers still have the front site post? Doesn't it get in the way of your line of sight? It would seem to me that if you go the flat-top route, that you'd be better off getting no front site post, or having one of the gas block picatinny rails. Opinions?
View Quote
It isn't the receiver that has the front sight post-- its the barrel. If you do not like it, you can get a different barrel, or remove the sight post. Easier to get a different barrel... I like the front sight post for backup iron sights...
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