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Posted: 10/31/2002 10:14:29 AM EDT
I was kicked out of the cub scouts so I never did learn to make fire with the two sticks method. I was sure all boy scouts know how to start fire this way. I was hanging out in the wood and thought I would teach myself. After a couple hours and much cussing I had no fire. Now I always though if I HAD to I could start a fire with no tools. I could not start on if my life depended on it at that time. When I got home and read up on it a little and learn from my mistakes and hope I will have better luck the next time. I was taking a break from mountain biking the blue Ridge mountains and a Boy Scout troop comes waking by and stops next to the stream. We say hi and I ask one the oldest ones if he can make fire with out tools. He states "Yes" I ask him if he every has " No " he says. He asked around and out of 15 kids at least two were eagle scout and the troop leader everybody said they could and NOBODY had done it to date. I am sorry for this long drawn out story. My point is if you think you can make fire with out tools and you haven't yet, you are most likely wrong. How many people here have ever made a fire with NO tools. I have a few hours practice and still haven't pulled it off yet, Been close but no flames.
Link Posted: 10/31/2002 10:18:00 AM EDT
Remember, if you DO make a fire, don't try to bring it onto an airplane.
Link Posted: 10/31/2002 10:26:34 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 10/31/2002 10:30:41 AM EDT by cluster]
we sire,, 7th grade class camping trip.. after we looked on as the guy in the coon skin hat did his thing.. After that we where burning down every thing we could.. took about 30 minutes for my first ever try and can do it now in about 5 .
Link Posted: 10/31/2002 10:44:15 AM EDT
There is no such thing as "...fire without tools". Tools are always involved in one way or another. I have started fire in many non-traditional ways, but no one can do it with their bare hands.
Link Posted: 10/31/2002 10:45:24 AM EDT
Do you consider a magnifying glass( actually binoculars) or flint and steel a tool? If so the answer is no. Lebrew
Link Posted: 10/31/2002 10:48:10 AM EDT
Originally Posted By u-baddog: My point is if you think you can make fire with out tools and you haven't yet, you are most likely wrong.
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ask over at [url]www.frugalsquirrels.com[/url] they'll have instructions and cover every detail. you'll be doing it five diefferent ways before the weekend is over.
Link Posted: 10/31/2002 10:51:10 AM EDT
What are they teaching them in scouts today. In my day, that was one of the things you had to do to get to eagle scout, or at least one of the merit badges you needed. I remember watching a dozen guys trying to start fires with the bow trick. I can't believe out of 15 no one in that troop had done it.
Link Posted: 10/31/2002 11:07:35 AM EDT
Link Posted: 10/31/2002 11:47:05 AM EDT
Originally Posted By racebaiter:
Originally Posted By u-baddog: My point is if you think you can make fire with out tools and you haven't yet, you are most likely wrong.
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ask over at [url]www.frugalsquirrels.com[/url] they'll have instructions and cover every detail. you'll be doing it five diefferent ways before the weekend is over.
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Ok I have some books that touch on the subject and even with that I have learned there is a skill you have to FEEL the wood and have the correct wood. It is a small world I have lurked at that site many times [beer]
Link Posted: 10/31/2002 12:13:39 PM EDT
Originally Posted By FooBarBaz: Remember, if you DO make a fire, don't try to bring it onto an airplane.
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Treetop's flaming backpack post needs its own special archive with a hotlink on the nav menu!! [:D]
Link Posted: 10/31/2002 12:31:26 PM EDT
hehehehe.....it's been a while, but I think it was the Wilderness Survival merit badge. Had to start a fire using: Flint and steel magnifying glass battery and steel woll stick/rub method (this one took a WHILE) Also had to build a wilderness shelter and then spend the night in it. Lots of fun.
Link Posted: 10/31/2002 12:35:35 PM EDT
Never tried the battery and steel wool method, but the "bow and dowel" (or whatever the hell it is called) method is pretty reliable. Fire without tools? Not sure what you mean. Do you mean "fire without matches" maybe?
Link Posted: 10/31/2002 12:43:52 PM EDT
I am an eagle scout(1995) I can and have started fires with -matches -steel wool/9volt -magnifying glass -bow and spinning wood thing(fastest friction fire starting method) -magnesium fire starter(with pocket knife starter) -Oxy/propane torch :D -butane lighter(most consistant fire starter) Most of the boy scouts that I was in with were fellow members of the junior pyromaniac club. Fire just came naturally.
Link Posted: 10/31/2002 12:46:47 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 10/31/2002 12:48:29 PM EDT by DevilsAdvocate]
Dad taught me how to make fire when I was 6 or 7 years old. It was probably the worst thing he ever taught me =) As far as "no tools", all you need is the knowledge of how to MAKE tools from found, natural resources. The "no tools" fire is a bit harder to do in the desert, but it CAN be done. If you are around birch trees, it gets REAL easy! Edited to add...Technically, you will always have SOME tools on you, unless you are buck naked or wear shoes with velcro (short bus shoes).
Link Posted: 10/31/2002 12:46:56 PM EDT
Link Posted: 10/31/2002 12:51:25 PM EDT
Fire from ICE. Is it possible?
Link Posted: 10/31/2002 1:12:48 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Fireboss: Fire from ICE. Is it possible?
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Possible yes, form the ice into a magnifying lens. Never tried though so no idea if it would actually work, in theory it should assuming enough sun light. I was a boy scout and have used all the listed ways to start fires but I've seen people work for hours and never even come close to starting a fire with the bow/spinning method.
Link Posted: 10/31/2002 1:36:12 PM EDT
its all about surface area and pressure with the bow method
Link Posted: 10/31/2002 1:39:57 PM EDT
Fire from ice. Melt ice Turn water into hydrogen (hard part) Supply a spark.
Link Posted: 10/31/2002 1:48:06 PM EDT
I can, duh, the movie Castaway taught me everything I know..... [rolleyes]
Link Posted: 10/31/2002 2:17:50 PM EDT
Originally Posted By MadProfessor: I can, duh, the movie Castaway taught me everything I know..... [rolleyes]
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LOL!!! While watching Castaway I bet I said no less than 10 times "OH! YOU DUMBASS!!!"
Link Posted: 10/31/2002 2:35:51 PM EDT
The hardest part of starting a fire in the woods is finding good dry tinder. Getting it hot enough to combust is the easy part. A mouse nest is ideal tender. It's usually fine, dry, plant material. Attempting to starting a fire with flint and steel is useless unless you also have a piece of charcloth, or gunpowder, or shaved magnesium to strike the sparks into.
Link Posted: 10/31/2002 2:57:34 PM EDT
Converting water into hydrogen would require FIRE.
Link Posted: 10/31/2002 3:05:27 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Headless_T_Gunner: The hardest part of starting a fire in the woods is finding good dry tinder. Getting it hot enough to combust is the easy part. A mouse nest is ideal tender. It's usually fine, dry, plant material.
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Ditto- see below.
Attempting to starting a fire with flint and steel is useless unless you also have a piece of charcloth, or gunpowder, or shaved magnesium to strike the sparks into.
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At reenactments, because we usually do not bring tents and set up with the main part of the army and its kitchens and huge fires (we are part of the advance guard, who historically had a rough camp at best) at most big Revolutionary War events, I have been known to put the tinder as above in the pan of a flintlock musket, then put the musket lockside down near the material to be burned, such as dry leaves and grass, then add wood, and it starts fires like a charm- much better than the cumbersome flint and steel or magnifying glass (Hey- where's the sun??) Of course, trying to light a clay pipe using this method poses its own problems [:D} [url]http://www.najecki.com/40thfoot/40index.html[/url]
Link Posted: 10/31/2002 3:08:20 PM EDT
Originally Posted By freeride21a: I am an eagle scout(1995) I can and have started fires with -matches -steel wool/9volt -magnifying glass -bow and spinning wood thing(fastest friction fire starting method) -magnesium fire starter(with pocket knife starter) -Oxy/propane torch :D -butane lighter(most consistant fire starter) Most of the boy scouts that I was in with were fellow members of the junior pyromaniac club. Fire just came naturally.
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heh, got mine (with three palms, I just have to brag about that one once in a while) in 97 (had to look at NESA card)... best method i had seen of starting a fire was on our final big fire in the site... Get a BIG (7' tall x 2.5' dia) log, bury it partway into the firepit (so it's still 5' tall), put a small hole in the bottom (above ground) stuff it full of pine needles and leaves and sticks and stuff.... dump in about a half gallon of coleman fuel wait 3-4 minutes while someone finds a railroad flare (dont ask) start at the edge of the log at the top with the flare and start slowly moving it to the inside of the log..... eventually the log wil light (and sound like a cannon going off)...the guy lighting it had no eyebrows left when he was done, but it was funny as hell!! [shotgun]
Link Posted: 10/31/2002 3:24:38 PM EDT
Originally Posted By 95thFoot: much better than the cumbersome flint and steel or magnifying glass (Hey- where's the sun??) Of course, trying to light a clay pipe using this method poses its own problems [:D} [/url]
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No offence, here but I have to disagree with your method here. I do F&I war Ranger stuff (not that Candy ass Counterfeiter and plagiarizer Rogers rangers either!) As a forward scout, and outpost unit, Our muskets are always loaded (no ball of course-it is after all a re-enactment!) Kinda hard to flash pan a fire with a loaded bess, without a discharge. A small steel takes up very little space in my kit, and I use a worn out musket flint rather than the huge chunks that the tinkers sell. Lighting a pipe is pretty easy with a small chunk of char- pinch it in with your flint, then spark it. As soon as you get a spark on it, blow it to get it red, then put it in your pipe- puff a little and your lit. If you old the flint over the bowl, it will increase the air velocity and light quicker. Just my .02
Link Posted: 10/31/2002 3:47:26 PM EDT
Little Drew Barrymore did it in "Firestarter". [flame]
Link Posted: 10/31/2002 4:02:22 PM EDT
Have done it many times when I was a kid and have a few times while bow-hunting up here in ND. The problem with doing it with readily available stuff in the woods is finding dry enough material to do it. Even during a dry season things can still be moist enough to make it take so long to make people stop trying in frustration. That's where the whole "do it if I had to" comes into play. When you truely have to, you'll take the time to do it. The method I usually use is with a bow and axle. The bow (shoestring tied to a flexible stick) and creates a lot more rotation in the axle and therefore generates more friction without as much effort. The base has to be heated up sufficiently with the axle to cause it to scorch and create ash cinders. This takes me a long frickin time and I usually just say to hell with it and use my zippo. The point is to carry the simpler items with you at all times when in the wild to make it unecessary to have to do it the hard way. How the hell do you do it in 5 minutes? (without flint/steel or a glass)
Link Posted: 10/31/2002 7:49:06 PM EDT
Link Posted: 11/1/2002 7:54:56 AM EDT
Originally Posted By Aimless: I've done the flint and steel and magnifying glass, but I'd have to be in pretty tough shape to bother with the bow and stick deal. I did see someone else do it once but most of the time I did not see it succeed. I've heard of people doing it with bullets by pulling them apart and using the powder-ignition could be tricky to pull off
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What do you think that primer is for? There are a number of really good compact, firestarter methods, but anyone who spends a lot of time in the backcountry should probably know and practice starting a fire without matches or a lighter. Flint and steel works, but using sticks is more basic and thus better reflects the conditions that will prevail if you are in a position where you can't use matches. (I don't know about you, but if I don't have access to at least one lighter, I have been thoroughly stripped of ALL my gear except perhaps my clothing and a pocket knife...maybe. Sticks and rocks are probably the extent of the "tools" I will have available to me in that case, So I'd better know how to start a fire with those tools. Actually, I need to work on this particular skill myself. I haven't done it in over ten years.
Link Posted: 11/1/2002 10:36:16 AM EDT
I will keep trying, as of now I keep a mag/flint combo on my key ring and when out in about I always keep a couple of the small butane lighters in different parts of my kit.
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