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Posted: 10/15/2002 12:13:03 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 10/15/2002 12:14:30 PM EDT by Aviator]
Did some detecting at a known campsite of the Custer expedition in the Black Hills this weekend. This shell casing is about 2 inches long. looks to be a .44 or .45 and has no primer. It fires like a .22 shell but was struck in the center. Anyone know what it might be? [img]www.ar15.com/members/albums/Aviator%2Fcuster1%2Ejpg[/img] [img]www.ar15.com/members/albums/Aviator%2Fcuster2%2Ejpg[/img] Aviator
Link Posted: 10/15/2002 12:28:06 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 10/15/2002 12:39:00 PM EDT by NOVA5]
whats that lighter grey dot? center of caseing base 2nd pic. looks like a primer to me. poor qual pick thou so cant really tell. tighter focus mabey.
Link Posted: 10/15/2002 12:32:11 PM EDT
You should be able to look this up in Cartridges of the World. It is probably an old .44 or .45 caliber center-fire (that little dot in the base is a primer). If you have pair of calibers, send measurements and I can look it up for you.
Link Posted: 10/15/2002 12:32:17 PM EDT
It is where the firing pin hit, Not a primer though. The end of the casing is smooth other than that indent. Aviator
Link Posted: 10/15/2002 12:35:54 PM EDT
Another pic [img]www.ar15.com/members/albums/Aviator%2Fcuster3%2Ejpg[/img] Aviator
Link Posted: 10/15/2002 12:37:01 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 10/15/2002 12:37:32 PM EDT by brouhaha]
Link Posted: 10/15/2002 12:41:38 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 10/15/2002 12:43:28 PM EDT by Aviator]
Originally Posted By cyoung: You should be able to look this up in Cartridges of the World. It is probably an old .44 or .45 caliber center-fire (that little dot in the base is a primer). If you have pair of calibers, send measurements and I can look it up for you.
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No Calipers, I sure wish I did though. Would love to know what it is. Like I said, It came from the area of a known campsite from the Custer expedition to the Black Hills in 1874. Found a great book about this that has GPS info on campsites, topo map info and photos from the exact same locations where photos were taken during the expidition. [img]www.custerstrail.com/Media/WagonTrainCastle.jpg[/img] I'd like to point out that all of the photos show [b]less[/b] trees in the area in the 1800s than today. so much for the tree huggers arguments. [url]http://www.custerstrail.com/index.html[/url]
Link Posted: 10/15/2002 12:45:41 PM EDT
Is the case brass or [b]copper[/b] ?
Link Posted: 10/15/2002 12:47:27 PM EDT
What you have there is a early, inside primed, folded head copper case .45/70. These were the crappy cartridges that so often jammed in .45/70 Trapdoors. The US Army didn't switch to boxer primed solid head cases till the 1880's.
Link Posted: 10/15/2002 12:53:13 PM EDT
Originally Posted By osprey21: Is the case brass or [b]copper[/b] ?
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Will it hurt the casing if I use some Brasso to find out? Aviator
Link Posted: 10/15/2002 1:01:19 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 10/15/2002 1:02:42 PM EDT by ArmdLbrl]
Originally Posted By Aviator:
Originally Posted By osprey21: Is the case brass or [b]copper[/b] ?
View Quote
Will it hurt the casing if I use some Brasso to find out? Aviator
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Depends on what you want to do with it later. Its crushed so its not much of a collectable, the value would be what ever sentemental value you place on having a relic from the Custer fight. If you take some of the patina off it wont look quite so old.
Link Posted: 10/15/2002 1:54:47 PM EDT
Link Posted: 10/15/2002 2:09:17 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 10/15/2002 2:19:00 PM EDT by ArmdLbrl]
The Little Bighorn was 1876. None of those cartridges you listed Brou have a 2" long case and they are all rimfire. This case is a inside primed centerfire. Its a early Government arsenal made, copper .45/70 M1873 case. They were made in a similar manner to the way we make .22 rimfire cases today. The body was stamped from a single thickness of copper, the rim is a single fold, and the primer was loaded into the case from the front into a indentation in the center of the case head. The case head was as flimsy as it sounds and they frequently did bulge and the Trapdoor extractor frequently cut through the rims. This method was chosen as it allowed the US Government to avoid paying fees on the Boxer and Berdan patents which were then still active.
Link Posted: 10/15/2002 3:30:27 PM EDT
Thanks for the info guys! Also, this was from Custer's expedition to the [b]Black Hills[/b] in 1874, not the Little Big Horn Battlefield. PS, and yes, it is copper. Aviator
Link Posted: 10/15/2002 4:15:43 PM EDT
I'll send you some ammo or mags or money for it. I am a cartridge collector, and I don't have one of those! Balming
Link Posted: 10/15/2002 4:42:47 PM EDT
Specs. for 45-70 cartridge- length, 2.035 Rim, .608, I hope this helps.
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