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Posted: 9/17/2002 2:40:18 PM EDT
I have the main plug (the one with the built in breaker ) for the GFCI circuit in my bathroom all the way out in the garage(two story house, both upstairs bathrooms are on this circuit for some reason,) so I have to go down stairs and out to the garage if it blows. (Made her stop using the hair dryer and it stopped blowing,)But I would like to find a way to move it inside, and eliminate the GFCI in the garage all together. Am I nuts, do I need an electrician for this? Oh and we just bought a freezer to put out there and it is the only outlet, I don't want it shutting down because of a hair dryer and not knowing about it.
Link Posted: 9/17/2002 2:48:29 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/17/2002 3:02:22 PM EDT by NOVA5]
the reason it is where it is is this, its the start of the circuit, and any outlets after it are protected. you CAN move it into the bathroom BUT place it at the first one on the circuit line in the bathroom. thatway any following ones in the bathroom are protected. and just move the standard outlet out to the garage. should a electrician do it? hmm.. they have to follow building codes'n'laws. so most likley they wont do it. once you have switched the 2 outlets when it blows only the ones after the GFCI will die, but the ones before it will still work. (it just breaks contact with the line wire coming into the outlet to kill power). --edit-- Editted to say.... TURN OFF THE BREAKER FIRST! never work on a live powerline unless you know what your doing. now to find the first outlet in that line that is in a bathroom will take some work. which bathroom is closest to the garage? generally it will be that one. now.. turn off the breaker and open one outlet, pull it from the box. disconnect one set of wires. (one white/black pair, ignore the bare ground) ensure that the outlet and the disconnected wires will NOT be touching nor will the disconnected wires themselves be touching. plug somthing into each outlet in that bathroom. turn them on. go turn the breaker back on. one or none should be on. if none. if one is on. you found it. if none, you found it. the reason both ring true is this One : you have power coming to the outlet bot not leaving it, you pulled the wires going ot the next. None : You pulled the power lines bringing power into it. now there is a chance that the one you have pulled out can be the second one, this will be evident by the pulled one having no power to run whats attached and the one still mounted does have power. now if both are equal distance you may have to check the other one. hiring a electrician to track the circuit may be best if you dont feel confident in messing with 120V powerlines. trust me getting shocked is NOT fun. doublt so if you get hooked on it. remember loony toons? the flashign skeleton? pretty close...
Link Posted: 9/17/2002 3:06:35 PM EDT
You can install a gfi outlet in each bathroom. The national electrical code requires each outlet in a bathroom to be gfi protected. Also the one in the garage has to be gfi protected. Your best bet is to replace the ones in the bathroom with gfi's and keep the one in the garage by itself. It sounds like the one in the garage is protecting the ones in the bathroom which is a legal way to comply with the code (and also the cheapest way). But you can rewire the one in the garage so it is by itself and use that same circuit to feed the bathrooms if you replace them with gfi's. The boxes the gfi's come in should have diagrams showing you how to do this. Be sure you turn off the circuit breaker before working on them. You also should consider a new hair dryer it sounds like it is drawing way too much current. If in any doubt don't hesitate to call an electrician. Your house and your life could be at stake if you screw up.
Link Posted: 9/17/2002 3:41:53 PM EDT
You don't by chance have a refrigerator or freezer in your garage on that circuit do you ?
Link Posted: 9/17/2002 5:23:15 PM EDT
If you have any outlets outside your house, there's a good chance that they are also wired through this GFI. The idea of protecting the outlets that are most likely to electrocute you (e.g., wherever contact with moisture is likely) is a good one. I'd strongly recommend that you don't eliminate some of that protection by yanking out the GFI or bypassing some of the circuits on it. If you're plagued with constant GFI-tripping, there's a good reason for it — either water has gotten into the wiring and/or a connected appliance, or the GFI is shot. In either case, the obvious solution is to fix the problem, not to eliminate the protection.
Link Posted: 9/17/2002 6:19:41 PM EDT
NOVA5- Thanks. Knew I could count on this board for an answer. exgi- I guess that is the problem, the garage is already gfci, but it takes out the bathroom. I would rather have it inside since there is no water near that outlet in the garage. osprey21- Not yet, but planning on it. That is why I want it to blow after that one not at that outlet. Why? Is there something I missed or wasn't covered? Skibane- I am pretty sure the outside plugs are on the kitchen circuit from what I have seen. It isn't constant tripping, it seems to have gone away now that she doesn't leave the hair dryer plugged into that outlet. Thanks for the advice though. I don't want to take it out of the circuit, I just don't want to worry about the freezer being taken out and us not knowing about it. I normally don't plug anything in to the bathroom plugs, so it could be days before I noticed that circuit was down. It doesn't seem to be blowing now, but normally I wouldn't hear about it till Monday when she tried to dry her hair, and that would be too long.
Link Posted: 9/17/2002 7:03:57 PM EDT
The wife's hairdryer and a freezer on the same curcuit might I suggest another one for the freezer. One exception in the code about garage gfis is you put in your freezer you can install a single plug not the duplex kind so you can only plug your freezer in it doesn't have to be gfi protected.
Link Posted: 9/17/2002 7:08:14 PM EDT
Yes. Legally? Not sure.
Link Posted: 9/17/2002 7:15:10 PM EDT
Another possible solution would be a freezer alarm that beeps whenever the interior temperature rises. Not sure who makes 'em, but a Google search should turn up some sources.
Link Posted: 9/17/2002 7:41:01 PM EDT
Another good solution is wire one light circuit to the freezer out let. One you use a lot but is not heavily loaded. The bathroom lite comes to mind . If circuit is dead, lite won't work. WILL get your attention!! SUPCO (Sealed Units Parts Company) makes such a temperature alarm. They make reasonably priced items that work remarkably well. Avaiable at refrigeration supply houses and appliance parts stores. Grainger (4JZ61)lists the SUPCO TA-7, $23.70 in my old catalog. More now. Excellent idea IMHO as more than just dead supply can melt your groceries!!
Link Posted: 9/17/2002 7:46:46 PM EDT
The easiest way would be to have an electrician come out look at the existing wiring tell you what you need to buy then schedule him in when you will be there. I just had an outlet run to the garage for a freezer due to I don't trust the GFI outlets I don't think it is recommended to plug in a freezer or refer to GFI outlets. total cost for me was about $100.00 wire $14.00 outlet with cover and box $10.00 breaker $25.00 labor 1 hour $55.00 peace of mind house won't burn down due to faulty wiring or the $300.00 in food in the freezer wont spoil $you decide... since you were adding a dedicated circuit to the freezer you shouldn't have any problems. a single 30 amp circuit should not blow with only a freezer on it. as for code just tell the electrician you would like to have the reset switch in the house. I don't think you would have a problem if the wires were capped and a blank plate installed over the existing outlet for code. Just my 2 cents.
Link Posted: 9/17/2002 9:04:13 PM EDT
New circuit for each bathroom: $500. Seperate circuit for the freezer: $100. Tell wifey to dry hair in garage: Priceless.
Link Posted: 9/18/2002 6:50:47 AM EDT
Sparky- Thought about it but did't know how much it would run to have a real electritian(sp) run one. MickeyMouse/Skibane- Not a bad idea regardless of what I do. The wife mentioned it might have one built in already. DevilsAdvocate- I didn't realize there might be code against it till I read it hear. What they don't know and all that. M4SpuD- I had no idea it was that cheap to get a new circuit wired in. I can't really blank off the out let in the garage since it is the only outlet in the garage. Well except for the one on the celing for the garage door. I need a place to plug in drop lights and my compressor.
Link Posted: 9/18/2002 6:53:01 AM EDT
Sparky- Thought about it but did't know how much it would run to have a real electritian(sp) run one. MickeyMouse/Skibane- Not a bad idea regardless of what I do. The wife mentioned it might have one built in already. DevilsAdvocate- I didn't realize there might be code against it till I read it hear. What they don't know and all that. M4SpuD- I had no idea it was that cheap to get a new circuit wired in. I can't really blank off the out let in the garage since it is the only outlet in the garage. Well except for the one on the celing for the garage door. I need a place to plug in drop lights and my compressor.
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