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Posted: 9/4/2002 10:14:24 PM EDT
Link Posted: 9/4/2002 10:20:29 PM EDT
Well if its like most VW's you have to push down on the gear shifter and then over to the R...
Link Posted: 9/4/2002 10:32:33 PM EDT
Link Posted: 9/4/2002 10:45:34 PM EDT
I had the same experience first time with a stick...........of course I was 14 y.o. at the time [;)] Sgtar15
Link Posted: 9/4/2002 11:08:18 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/4/2002 11:08:53 PM EDT by raven]
Find a relatively steeply graded hill and try starting from first gear on it. Easing off the brake, holding the car with resistance from the clutch, while giving it gas when you're pointed uphill is probably the hardest thing to do with a manual.
Link Posted: 9/4/2002 11:17:13 PM EDT
I remember my first time driving a manual transmission. It was in a big, ancient International 2.5 ton flatbed truck while bucking hay back when I was 14. I still vividly remember some scruffy old farmhand stacking bales on the back growling "Don't worry, kid, they'll those gears out of rubber next time" as I ground the gears, lurched back and forth, and tossed him about.
Link Posted: 9/4/2002 11:22:41 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/4/2002 11:23:39 PM EDT by GSG9]
I'm guessing that you are letting the clutch out too quick for fear of "riding it". Try easing the clutch out until you feel it begin to catch then giving it a little fuel while you ease it on out, in other words as the clutch comes up the gas goes down. Be carefull though, too much fuel and you'll end up "greenhorning" or needing new tires before you need that new clutch. Jake
Link Posted: 9/4/2002 11:24:53 PM EDT
Sticks are a motherf*er! I can drive a race car just fine but on the road(some place where you can't go very fast) I suck. You have to do some much crap to change from gear to gear but it only take a valvebody the blink of an eye to do. You can have it,I'll stick to my 4 speed auto w/OD.
Link Posted: 9/5/2002 5:06:53 AM EDT
The shifter should be your friend. Try this at home with the engine off practice shifting with a very light touch. Use the clutch pedal like you would if you were driving. When putting in REV push down gently then over, if you push too hard it will wear parts and will be harder to get into gear. If it has a lot of play in the shifter the bushings can be replaced at a low cost.
Link Posted: 9/5/2002 7:48:54 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/5/2002 8:12:54 AM EDT by Hoplite]
Link Posted: 9/5/2002 8:23:44 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/5/2002 8:44:46 AM EDT by NOVA5]
in general a good thing to do is while you are bringing the clutch up keep the RPMs at 2500-3000, when they start to drop because your bringing the clutch up give it a bit more power. should be relatively smooth. when you get good you can bring the clutch up and take off from a stop very smoothly in less than 3 seconds. whereas now your probably around 10 seconds. the next interesting one is starting uphill! [;)] yep once your moving the shifting is easy as pie. but its the starting level/uphill that's a trick to learn. starting downhill is easy.
Link Posted: 9/5/2002 8:41:58 AM EDT
My first manual transmission car was a 94 Mustang GT. It's now got 155K miles on it, with the factory clutch. Yes it's starting to slip under full power upshifts, but not too bad, yet. Slow and smooth was the key to learning for me. First time manual shifting and long clutch life are not always mutually exclusive. Keep that foot off of the clutch pedal while not shifting, and stay away from 'power-shifting' and I'm sure you'll do just fine. Have fun, and enjoy that new car! wannabe
Link Posted: 9/5/2002 8:53:43 AM EDT
Good job, Hoplite. Once you get the hang of it really well, try a little more refinement. I remember "Click and Clack" radio show guys said that a good measurement of proper clutch use is this: Imagine you're in a 20 minute stop-and-go traffic jam. How many times do you stall the car? The "correct" answer is 3 to 5 times, roughly, of course. In other words, if you never stall, you are wearing the cluth too much on your releases. If you are stalling all the time, you can stand to wear a little bit more. I learned at the age of 9 in my dad's Toyota pickup. Once you learn it, you'll never forget it.
Link Posted: 9/5/2002 9:02:23 AM EDT
Try driving a clutch without the synchro-mesh! We had some old Bedford trucks when I was in the army, and they did not have the synchro, so you had to double-clutch, and pretty much match the engine revs to the gearbox before shifting - it was a nightmare to drive [:D]
Link Posted: 9/5/2002 9:45:21 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/5/2002 9:46:12 AM EDT by GSG9]
Originally Posted By NOVA5: in general a good thing to do is while you are bringing the clutch up [red]keep the RPMs at 2500-3000[/red], when they start to drop because your bringing the clutch up give it a bit more power. should be relatively smooth. when you get good you can bring the clutch up and take off from a stop very smoothly in less than 3 seconds. whereas now your probably around 10 seconds. the next interesting one is starting uphill! [;)] yep once your moving the shifting is easy as pie. but its the starting level/uphill that's a trick to learn. starting downhill is easy.
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You sure that shouldn't be 1400 to 1800? If you caught traction at 3K Rpm and continued to throttle in my car there would be so much white smoke and tire squawl that you'd think it was the end of time. Jake
Link Posted: 9/5/2002 9:48:03 AM EDT
at least yors is a car, i am LEARNING NOW in an 1984 international 72 pass. school bus.. try that one on for size..
Link Posted: 9/5/2002 9:54:32 AM EDT
Now, master heel and toe downshifting. Also, get into a big truck, you know, with dual range tranny, and master the double clutch. Once you have those two down, you are offically a "Manual Transmission Master Shifter."
Link Posted: 9/5/2002 10:29:12 AM EDT
Originally Posted By GSG9:
Originally Posted By NOVA5: in general a good thing to do is while you are bringing the clutch up [red]keep the RPMs at 2500-3000[/red], when they start to drop because your bringing the clutch up give it a bit more power. should be relatively smooth. when you get good you can bring the clutch up and take off from a stop very smoothly in less than 3 seconds. whereas now your probably around 10 seconds. the next interesting one is starting uphill! [;)] yep once your moving the shifting is easy as pie. but its the starting level/uphill that's a trick to learn. starting downhill is easy.
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You sure that shouldn't be 1400 to 1800? If you caught traction at 3K Rpm and continued to throttle in my car there would be so much white smoke and tire squawl that you'd think it was the end of time. Jake
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*shrugs* used to drive a puny V6 2.8 Liter GMC Jimmy. you woul dhave problems getting it to smoke tires. course i normally did rapid starts.... ;) also had the clutch just disingrate thrice. first time we replaced the clutch pad figuring on age. nope.. second time we replaced it and the master cylinder, nope. turned out to the the slave cylinder wasnt full releasing the clutchpads back down onto the flywheel. so they would slide ever so slightly. then in tehi middle of driving. POOF turn to powder.all that was left was a fine black powder in the bottom of the mannytranny.
Link Posted: 9/5/2002 6:12:15 PM EDT
Umm...what is "riding the clutch"? I bought a 5 spd f150 a few weeks ago and am getting the hang of this whole thing I think...but I don't want to ruin something unwittingly.
Link Posted: 9/5/2002 6:25:37 PM EDT
My first stick was a 94 Honda Civic. I had never driven a stick when I went to the dealership to test drive it. It went really smooth. Didnt stall etc. I had driven a dirt bike before so I kinda had an idea of how to work with a clutch. Hills: Not really a problem. Just pull on the e-brake and when the light turns green slowly let out the clutch and release the e-brake all at the same time.
Link Posted: 9/5/2002 6:37:20 PM EDT
Originally Posted By NOVA5:
Originally Posted By GSG9:
Originally Posted By NOVA5: in general a good thing to do is while you are bringing the clutch up [red]keep the RPMs at 2500-3000[/red], when they start to drop because your bringing the clutch up give it a bit more power. should be relatively smooth. when you get good you can bring the clutch up and take off from a stop very smoothly in less than 3 seconds. whereas now your probably around 10 seconds. the next interesting one is starting uphill! [;)] yep once your moving the shifting is easy as pie. but its the starting level/uphill that's a trick to learn. starting downhill is easy.
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You sure that shouldn't be 1400 to 1800? If you caught traction at 3K Rpm and continued to throttle in my car there would be so much white smoke and tire squawl that you'd think it was the end of time. Jake
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*shrugs* used to drive a puny V6 2.8 Liter GMC Jimmy. you woul dhave problems getting it to smoke tires. course i normally did rapid starts.... ;)
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It all depends on the car, my Honda with a clutch cable needs just under 2500 rpm to take off smoothly, but my Nissan Maxima with a hydraulic system is amazing, this car can take off on idle alone with NO extra gas pedal at all, except uphills.
Link Posted: 9/5/2002 6:45:19 PM EDT
Originally Posted By zonan: Umm...what is "riding the clutch"? I bought a 5 spd f150 a few weeks ago and am getting the hang of this whole thing I think...but I don't want to ruin something unwittingly.
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Riding the clutch is when you keep your foot on the clutch all the time, and also when stopping at a light it is better to keep it in neutral thanto hold down the clutch pedal. Another good tip is to keep your hand off the stick unless shifting, riding the stick can lead to tranny problems later on.
Link Posted: 9/5/2002 7:19:05 PM EDT
plus if you get the She-Bitch that no one passes the first time keep your hand off the shifter unless shifting.... She-bitch go me, so i took a bit of rubbin alcohole and wiped off the sharpie note on the learners permit and went to the next towns DMV. got the cute blond everyone passes if the do reasonably well [;)}
Link Posted: 9/5/2002 7:39:19 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Hoplite: I ride down old country road from Melville where it begins, and manage to hit no lights for a good 10-15 minutes.
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Two minutes from my house, I'm inbetween St Anthony's and DPA, where do you live? Too bad I have to work tomorrow, I'd give you a driving lesson! [;)] Yeah, for reverse, it took me awhile to figure out how to back the S4 out of the space. Its something I fortunately had someone to tell me about though! If you're continuing to have problems, I'll be around LI this weekend starting tomorrow night. Email me and maybe I can help teach you. If you get stuck in the future, give me a call, I'll try to talk you down! I'm IMing you my #.
Link Posted: 9/5/2002 9:11:37 PM EDT
Darn – your story gave me flashbacks. I lived in New Hyde Park for a while in the early 1970’s. I had an MGB back then (manual, of course). Getting stuck on the BQE or LIE during rush hour was exhausting – arms and legs going everywhere like a one-man band! I’ll take an automatic, thank you! As Schapman45 mentions, till you get the hang of things, the emergency brake it can really help you when stopped facing uphill. After a while you should be able to simply slide your right foot off the brake and hit the gas the same instant you let the clutch start to engage. Things I’d suggest: Keep your finger or thumb on the emergency brake release so that it doesn’t engage. Check your owner’s manual for recommended up and down shifting RPM’s. Make sure gears are fully engaged before releasing the clutch. When stopped facing uphill, don’t roll into the car behind you!
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