Warning

 

Close

Confirm Action

Are you sure you wish to do this?

Confirm Cancel
Member Login
Posted: 8/26/2002 10:03:07 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/26/2002 10:06:41 PM EDT by Kingme]
Someone earlier on some site commented that he had only found one children's book with guns in it. I went to Border's Book Store the other day and checked the concept out. I believe it's true. I looked at the book mentioned. The title is "Each Peach Pear Plum" by Janet and Allan Ahlberg. Yes, there were guns in the book but not too complementary to the cause. There was one scene where three bears, Papa bear, Mama bear, and Baby bear, were walking with rifles over their shoulders. The baby bear, trailing the parent bears, trips and accidentally fires off a round. The round is shown in the book as hitting a rope and cutting it. One end of the rope was tied to a tree limb and the other end was tied to a basket holding a human baby. The baby and the basket now severed from the tree limb, resultantly started to fall into a river. There's also a second scene where the baby bear trips again and the gun goes off. What's wrong with these scenes? Can children learn from them? What will they learn? Can a safety issue be made here? I'm still debating the issue. One other book was entitled something about going bear hunting. This human family goes out in search of a bear without a gun. They search here and they search there and finally come to a cave where they find a bear. The bear comes at them and then they run here and run there with the bear in hot pursuit. When they reach home, the bear tries to get into the home so the family boards it up. At the end the family vows to "never go bear hunting again". Well neither would I without a gun. But the message of the book seems to be not to hunt. Anybody know of any children's books that portrays guns in a better manner?
Link Posted: 8/26/2002 11:24:18 PM EDT
I can't recall ever seeing anything remotely resembling a pro-rkba book for children. If there were I'm sure it would not be found in any government school library. The only thing that might come close would be the Grampa Jack series of phamplets from the JPFO website. There is at least one dealing with rkba. You might want to contact them and/or the Gun Owners of America website and ask them about this subject. This also might be a small niche market for someone who can write.
Link Posted: 8/27/2002 12:07:54 AM EDT
I have an old (60's? 70's?) book called "The How, Why and Wonder Book of Guns". It starts from the invention of black powder and spends it's 50 (or so) pages detailing the evolution of guns in simple words and great illustrations. The book touches on "modern military weapons", but since it's kind of old, it only gets through the 1903, the M1 Garand, and the M14. There's also a short story about gun safety at the end. If you can find one anywhere, it's a really good book. Not a single anti-gun word in the whole volume.
Link Posted: 8/27/2002 6:44:49 AM EDT
Originally Posted By Kaiser_Soze: I can't recall ever seeing anything remotely resembling a pro-rkba book for children. If there were I'm sure it would not be found in any government school library. The only thing that might come close would be the Grampa Jack series of phamplets from the JPFO website. There is at least one dealing with rkba. You might want to contact them and/or the Gun Owners of America website and ask them about this subject. This also might be a small niche market for someone who can write.
View Quote
Have you ever actually looked in a school library? I have seen numerous books that portray guns in various ways in several school libraries. Most were either historical books or ones that dealt with hunting and sport shooting. These were mostly geared for older children (9 and up). I will see what I can find for younger ones.
Link Posted: 8/27/2002 7:04:38 AM EDT
Funny you should mention that book (and thread). I was the one who wrote that thread and just last night I was reading that book to my son again! But anyway, I didn't see it as anti-gun at all. True it had a couple AD/NDs (actually I thought the same thing as you when I first read it) - but it also has kids falling down hills, wicked witches and Robin Hood actually [b]bow hunting[/b] the wicked witch from a tree too! And if you want to get REAL serious, just how in the hell did a family of BEARS get a hold of guns in the first place? [:D]
Link Posted: 8/27/2002 8:03:14 AM EDT
Why, from the Second Amendment, of course: A well regulated militia, being necessary to the security of a free state, the right of the people and bears to keep arms, shall not be infringed.
View Quote
LMFAO!!!!!!
Link Posted: 8/27/2002 11:01:42 AM EDT
One of the very first books I can remember reading, at about six or seven years old, was about a Cocker Spaniel dog who won awards as a bird-hunting dog. I think it was called "Champion Dog - Prince Tom" or something similar. It was a childrens book, though a bit more mature than most these days. The father of the family was into bird hunting competitions using dogs to flush the birds, under voice command, and the Cocker wins the championship. One of my first introductions to hunting. I may still have it boxed up somewhere.
Link Posted: 8/27/2002 11:25:44 AM EDT
A book I remember from my childhood was about a young boy in Idaho/Montana some place like that. Anyway he was taking care of some sheep/cattle and this bear is coming along and helping it self to free meals. The boy ends up using the rifle to kill the bear, it was an H&H Magnum rifle, .300 or .375 It was a long time ago..... Man I feel old
Link Posted: 8/27/2002 11:48:41 AM EDT
Was that book called "Big Red" by Jim Kjelgaard or somthing like that? "Big Red" was about an Irish Setter that goes to live on a rural ranch with a wealthy man. A young man who was living nearby with his father adopted the dog in order to train it. The boy and his father shot partridges for food, and the dog was taught how to hunt. The book tells about how the boy rarely missed a bird with his 12 ga., but the father hunted with a .22 pistol, and shot the birds in the head as they flew away. A large bear started mauling the ranchers cows, and the boy set off with the dog to hunr down the bear. It was finally dispatched with multiple .30-30 rounds to the head. It is a great kids book. It is probably suitable for 7-12 year olds.
Link Posted: 8/27/2002 11:52:13 AM EDT
I remember one I read either in 7th or 8th grade that had a boy (maybe 12 or so) who would hunt with two dogs he mail ordered. Forget what type. He would hunt racoons. And was even in a competition for racoon hunting I think. The dogs died in the end protecting the kid from a bear or some other animal if I recall correctly...
Link Posted: 8/27/2002 11:58:45 AM EDT
I read all those books in 4th and 5th grade (1974 and 1975). Those were great books!
Link Posted: 8/27/2002 12:07:29 PM EDT
"Where the Red Fern Grows", and they were Redbones. Was a Disney movie too. Got it around here somewhere. Good flick. I'm thinking several of the Grimm's Tales had firearms mentioned. Seems Peter Wolf did too. Might have a few stories blended in my mind though.
Link Posted: 8/27/2002 12:27:03 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Torf: Was that book called "Big Red" by Jim Kjelgaard or somthing like that? "Big Red" was about an Irish Setter that goes to live on a rural ranch with a wealthy man. A young man who was living nearby with his father adopted the dog in order to train it. The boy and his father shot partridges for food, and the dog was taught how to hunt. The book tells about how the boy rarely missed a bird with his 12 ga., but the father hunted with a .22 pistol, and shot the birds in the head as they flew away. A large bear started mauling the ranchers cows, and the boy set off with the dog to hunr down the bear. It was finally dispatched with multiple .30-30 rounds to the head. It is a great kids book. It is probably suitable for 7-12 year olds.
View Quote
Kjelgaard's Big Red was a kickass book-I still have it, and the sequels, Irish Red, and Outlaw Red, plus another good one, Stormy(I think) about a black lab, and an jailed man's son running a trap line. All great stuff for boys. By the same author, Wildlife cameraman, and A Nose For Trouble, and Traling Trouble, about a forest ranger and his hound dog, also highly reccomended. Where the Red Fern Grows is another boy, guns and dogs classic. Read it for school, right around the time I got my puppy, at age 13... Darn, now I have to dig them out and read them again... Juggernaut
Link Posted: 8/27/2002 1:04:33 PM EDT
Why, from the Second Amendment, of course: A well regulated militia, being necessary to the security of a free state, the right of the people and bears to keep arms, shall not be infringed.
View Quote
No, no, no! Why do people always misquote this amendment? It's actually... "A well regulated militia, being necessary to the security of a free state, the right of the people to keep and arm [b]bears[/b], shall not be infringed."
Link Posted: 8/27/2002 2:09:58 PM EDT
My dad used to read to me stories from the book [u]The Old Man and the Boy[/u] before I could read. After that I could never get into a good "Winnie the Pooh" story although Dr. Suess still kicks a$$. Kyle
Link Posted: 8/27/2002 2:15:21 PM EDT
Originally Posted By garheadjr: "Where the Red Fern Grows", and they were Redbones. Was a Disney movie too. Got it around here somewhere. Good flick. I'm thinking several of the Grimm's Tales had firearms mentioned. Seems Peter Wolf did too. Might have a few stories blended in my mind though.
View Quote
Yeah that sounds rihgt. And the whole class had to read it. Can't recall however if it was the whole book or an abridged one that you find in the english books.
Link Posted: 8/27/2002 6:50:56 PM EDT
i wonder what a dr suess gun book would be like? "when the pin hits z primer on your very woked glock" ahh hell i cant think off a good one
Link Posted: 8/27/2002 7:02:57 PM EDT
My 7-year old boy's favorite books are "Small Arms Of The World", "Complete Book of Firearms" and "Assault Pistols, Rifles And Submachine Guns". I think those good reading for kids (definitely good father/son time), but I've never seen them in the children's section at Borders. If someone wrote a good pro-gun book for kids, it would probably have to be self-published and I seriously doubt it would make it to the shelves of any major bookseller. Not enough room with all those copies of "Heather Has Two Mommies" out there.
Link Posted: 8/27/2002 7:10:53 PM EDT
Come to think of it, there was one book I had to read in the gubmint elementary school (or maybe it was junior high). I don't recall the title, but it was the story of two brothers who were exploring around their farm and as one was crossing between the strands of a fence, the trigger of his rifle got caught and shot his brother in the back of the head killing him. The falling body, the oozing blood, the open eyes, etc. were thoroughly described. I'm sure the author grew up around guns that had no trigger guard [rolleyes]. Of course, I was subjected to this propaganda long before the tinfoil hat was invented. [(:)]
Link Posted: 8/27/2002 7:11:24 PM EDT
Originally Posted By BlammO: If someone wrote a good pro-gun book for kids, it would probably have to be self-published and I seriously doubt it would make it to the shelves of any major bookseller. Not enough room with all those copies of "Heather Has Two Mommies" out there.
View Quote
Well... the publisher of Safari Press, Ludo Wurfbain recently published a children's book entitled "The Education of Nagomo". [url]www.safaripress.com/shop/theeducationofnagomo.html[/url] It's a hunting-focused child's fable we have in our home. Ludo Wurfbain is a well-known big game hunter whose Safari Press continues to publish excellent works on Africa, Asia and other hunting locales. Arock
Link Posted: 8/27/2002 7:11:54 PM EDT
even Winne the Pooh, had a rifle by his bed..(1st movie) (watched it tonight with my daughter) [:)] ok, so it was a pop/cork gun, but hey, he's a stuffed bear!!
Link Posted: 8/27/2002 8:22:01 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Arock:
Originally Posted By BlammO: If someone wrote a good pro-gun book for kids, it would probably have to be self-published and I seriously doubt it would make it to the shelves of any major bookseller. Not enough room with all those copies of "Heather Has Two Mommies" out there.
View Quote
Well... the publisher of Safari Press, Ludo Wurfbain recently published a children's book entitled "The Education of Nagomo". [url]www.safaripress.com/shop/theeducationofnagomo.html[/url] It's a hunting-focused child's fable we have in our home. Ludo Wurfbain is a well-known big game hunter whose Safari Press continues to publish excellent works on Africa, Asia and other hunting locales. Arock
View Quote
From the Safari Press web site:
A fable for our time in the tradition of Aesop, La Fontaine, and Kipling. This beautifully illustrated children's book focuses on the "hot" environmental issues of today. Through the techniques of magic and imagery, this story in fable form teaches children about the thorny problems currently facing animals and humans. Its purpose is to give children insight into such ideas as conservation, habitat destruction, overpopulation, poaching, and extinction, by looking at certain endangered animal including the rhino, elephant, addax, cheetah, and gorilla. The story is projected through the eyes of an eight-year-old boy from Zaire and his magical friend and mentor, the Patron Wizard of the animals of Africa. Guaranteed to delight young and old alike. Foreword by Michael Dee, curator of the Los Angeles Zoo. Recommended for ages seven through adult.
View Quote
Well, it sounds a little suspicious, but looking around the site and reading your endorsement, I bet it's pretty good. Out of curiosity, I'll see if I can get a copy through Borders and/or the local library. Could be interesting. If not, I'll order direct 'cause you've piqued my curiosity. And it's on sale for only $5.98!
Link Posted: 8/27/2002 8:31:29 PM EDT
OK, I should research better before I blurt things out. It's available online from Borders/Amazon and Barnes & Noble, so I guess I can get it in the store if I'm willing to wait 6 months. The San Antonio public library system doesn't have it or anything else by the author. Looks like I'm gonna take advantage of that sale price!
Link Posted: 8/27/2002 8:34:05 PM EDT
YES! YES! YES! I have a few old Dr. Seuss books WITH characters that have GUNS!! They are older Leather/denim covered ones but they ALL have pictures of men with guns hunting lions and elephants and LOTS of pictures of asian men working on railroads. If I knew how to post pictures I would. If any of you guys would like to email me I can send the pictures and you can post them here for all of the fine people to see!! I hate green eggs and ham...
Link Posted: 8/27/2002 8:38:58 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/27/2002 8:54:03 PM EDT by raven]
I read an old book in elementary school (1980-1986) called The Matchlock. It was about a boy who defended his family from Indians in the 1700's or 1800's with an old matchlock musket, with shot he improvised from metal scraps and buttons. Hey! First published in 1941, and it's still around. [url]http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/0613118502/qid=1030509217/sr=8-1/ref=sr_8_1/103-7570649-5907032?v=glance&s=books&n=507846[/url] This was the first book that sprang to mind, even after all these years. A father puts his young son in charge of the home's defense while he's away, giving him a gun. And as it happens, he and the gun end up saving the homestead against hostile Indians. Very manly. Buy this book for your boy.
Top Top