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Posted: 7/29/2002 1:08:50 AM EDT
How many people does it take to pull a 747 with a rope?
Link Posted: 7/29/2002 1:12:14 AM EDT
[b]1[/b] if its on a downhill slope. 300 on a level grade. what do I win?
Link Posted: 7/29/2002 8:19:02 AM EDT
Originally Posted By ARndog: 300 on a level grade. what do I win?
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Considering that you're wrong, you get zip. [:)]
Link Posted: 7/29/2002 8:25:58 AM EDT
full of people? tankful of gas? a cargo 747 or a passenger 747?
Link Posted: 7/29/2002 8:27:58 AM EDT
a midget, bucket of fried chicken, can of FDS, a goat, 3 tubes of preperation H, and a specimen cup?
Link Posted: 7/29/2002 9:54:27 AM EDT
where is the rope tied to the plane? at the COG? on its tail, and is it to be suspeneded nose down X feet of the ground?.
Link Posted: 7/29/2002 10:38:49 AM EDT
Smooth, level factory floor. Fresh off the production line 747, no fuel/cargo, one occupant in the cockpit to keep aircraft from rolling away. Rope tied to tow point on nose landing gear assembly.
Link Posted: 7/29/2002 10:44:21 AM EDT
to many, they have impressive brakes.
Link Posted: 7/29/2002 10:46:27 AM EDT
Just one to pull and a whole lot more pushing
Link Posted: 7/29/2002 10:48:29 AM EDT
1 saw a strongman contest where this guy pulled a 747 from its tow hitch using a harness with only his legs and another rope (to pull on w/arms) to help him forward.
Link Posted: 7/29/2002 10:57:10 AM EDT
I don't know, tell us dammit!!! So you saw 1 person pull a 747, slacko? If I ever saw that with my own 2 eyes I'd still be in disbelief!
Link Posted: 8/2/2002 5:26:33 PM EDT
And the answer is: 70 That's right, it takes 70 average people to generate the 8,000 pounds of pulling force necessary to start a 747 rolling on an even, level surface. Once it starts moving, it only requires 4,000 pounds of force to continue to move it.
Link Posted: 8/2/2002 5:31:51 PM EDT
some more useless trivia: The Boeing 727 did not initially come with an APU. (it was dependant upon ground based units for airstart.) (APU= Auxillary Power Unit) The McDonnel/Douglas DC-8 was initially equipt with a freon base A/C system! (A/C= Air Conditioning)
Link Posted: 8/2/2002 5:35:01 PM EDT
Man, when you said useless trivia, you meant it.
Link Posted: 8/2/2002 6:17:10 PM EDT
More useless trivia. The prototype of the Boeing 707 was called the Dash 80.
Link Posted: 8/2/2002 8:08:07 PM EDT
here's a slightly obscure one for you we all have seen the 707, 727, 737,747,757,767, and latest 777..... anyone out there know what happened to 717?? and no it wasn't just a skip in the sequence, the design that got that number WAS produced, and examples are flying today. anyone want to hazard a guess??
Link Posted: 8/2/2002 8:15:13 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/2/2002 8:18:19 PM EDT by ar10er]
[url]www.boeing.com/companyoffices/gallery/images/commercial/717-200ind.html[/url] Better shot detritus? [url]www.boeing.com/companyoffices/gallery/images/commercial/717200-17.html[/url]
Link Posted: 8/2/2002 8:56:23 PM EDT
Originally Posted By detritus: here's a slightly obscure one for you we all have seen the 707, 727, 737,747,757,767, and latest 777..... anyone out there know what happened to 717?? and no it wasn't just a skip in the sequence, the design that got that number WAS produced, and examples are flying today. anyone want to hazard a guess??
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Are you talking about the DC9/717 aircrafts in service?
Link Posted: 8/2/2002 8:57:49 PM EDT
(I will preface this with "I may be WAY off base, I am working from memory of written data I saw prior to 1995", I will also state in an effort to be candid that I am home with bronchitis and the meds the doc gave me contain codeine so that maybe further befuddling me) AR10er, looks like Boeing re-used the designation (kinda weird that 727-767 were flying and the development of many major components of "triple 7" were nearing completion, before the 717 made it's rollout [according to the 717 data at the boeing site you linked to]), since there was never a commercial version of the one i was thinking of. what i was remembering was a mention in an airforce tech manual my neighbor (AFRES engine mechanic) showed me for the KC-135. stated that the "C-135" family of military airframes (KC-135, RC-135, and E-3)were based on a Boeing upgrade of the 707 called 717, and the the major diff was a beefing up of the structural components and some changes in control and electrical systems. if this is all complete bull with not basis in fact at all please do let me know. thank you
Link Posted: 8/2/2002 9:00:44 PM EDT
Link Posted: 8/2/2002 9:04:56 PM EDT
Originally Posted By detritus: here's a slightly obscure one for you we all have seen the 707, 727, 737,747,757,767, and latest 777..... anyone out there know what happened to 717?? and no it wasn't just a skip in the sequence, the design that got that number WAS produced, and examples are flying today. anyone want to hazard a guess??
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There was also a 720 if memory serves. Four engines and slightly smaller than a 707. Back in the 1960's.
Link Posted: 8/2/2002 9:08:47 PM EDT
Well, at one time, it was called the DC 9....Then, I believe it became the MD-80, and now, it is called the 717......
Originally Posted By detritus: here's a slightly obscure one for you we all have seen the 707, 727, 737,747,757,767, and latest 777..... anyone out there know what happened to 717?? and no it wasn't just a skip in the sequence, the design that got that number WAS produced, and examples are flying today. anyone want to hazard a guess??
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Link Posted: 8/2/2002 9:09:32 PM EDT
The Boeing 717-200 started life as the McDonnell Douglas MD-95. The aircraft is the last in the DC-9/MD-80/MD-90 family of aircraft After the merger between McDonnell Douglas and Boeing in 1997 Boeing re-launched the aircraft as the Boeing 717-200. Interestingly this is the second Boeing aircraft to be called the 717. The original 717 was a 1960's derivative of the 707. It was renamed the KC-135 Stratotanker.
Link Posted: 8/2/2002 9:19:37 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/2/2002 9:22:49 PM EDT by Arock]
Had to do some memory recharge. The shorter range variant of the 707 was originally called the 707-020 then the 717-020 and finally the 720-020. It was variously 9 ft to 16 ft shorter than the base model 707 with a wingspan 15 feet narrower. Also had leading edge Kruger flaps. [img]http://www.panamair.org/Aircraft/720sky.jpg[/img] It was the short field, medium-haul aircraft that functionally preceeded the 727. Boeing built 154 for the commercial market between 1960 and 1969. United launched the type and Western got the last one.
Link Posted: 8/2/2002 9:26:53 PM EDT
And then right from Boeing's own web page: 707 Family Boeing 707 prototype, the model 367-80 The first commercial 707s, labeled the 707-120 the 720 series, which was lighter and faster with better runway performance. the larger 707-320 Intercontinental Military Derivatives another aircraft that traces its ancestry to the 707 prototype is the U.S. Air Force KC/C-135 tanker-transport/cargo airplane. The KC/C-135 series was initially designated within The Boeing Company as the model 717. Additionally, three 707-120s plus two 707-320Bs, designated VC-137s, were delivered to the Military Airlift Command for transporting high government officials. These 707s transported the President for more than 30 years Recent military applications of the 707 are the E-3 AWACS and the E-6 used by the U.S. Navy for submarine communications. When the 707 production line was closed at the end of May 1991, Boeing had sold 1,010 of all types (not counting the KC-135 series). SO, what did Tex do, where did he do it, when, and what was he in? What was the last 707/135 airframe to roll off the Boeing production line and who has it today?
Link Posted: 8/2/2002 9:31:09 PM EDT
Boeing's web page is wonderfully confusing. Here's a quote from it...
The Boeing 720 was a derivative of the 707 designed for operating short to medium range routes from shorter runways. The aircraft was originally referred to as the 707-020 and then the 717-020 before the designation 720-020 was finally agreed on. The aircraft was 2.7m (9ft) shorter than the 707-100. Other changes included a redesigned wing with new full-span leading edge Kruger flaps. Maximum capacity was for 165 passengers in an all-tourist class layout. United Airlines was the launch customer for the 720 and ordered 29 of the aircraft. The fist example was put into service on July 5, 1960. A total of 154 720's were built with the final example being delivered to Western Airlines on September 20, 1967.
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Link Posted: 8/2/2002 11:40:06 PM EDT
Twenty guys, if they are pulling with their penises. I am NOT making this up. [url]http://dir.salon.com/sex/world/2001/01/12/airplane/index.html[/url]
Link Posted: 8/3/2002 6:04:38 AM EDT
Originally Posted By USNJoe: SO, what did Tex do, where did he do it, when, and what was he in?
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I originally wrote this in a response on another discussion board: "The commericial plane that Boeing did bet the company on was the 367-80, a revolutionary commercial jet airplane that ultimately became the 707. Boeing first demonstrated the 367-80 to the public at the Gold Cup hydroplane races at Lake Washington on August 7, 1955. Boeing test pilot Tex Johnson proceeded to do a barrel roll over the crowd, something the aircraft had not been expected to do. Then he did it again, assuring his place in Seattle lore. The 707 went on to be a very successfull airplane, remaining in production for over 30 years, spawning a slew of derivatives and subsequent models, and establishing Boeing as the world's premier commercial aircraft manufacturer."
What was the last 707/135 airframe to roll off the Boeing production line and who has it today?
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I don't know the exact answer to this question, but I did build new 707 components when I worked at Boeing back in the late 80s/early 90s, when the AWACs was still based on a 707 airframe. Now it is based on a 767 airframe.
Link Posted: 8/4/2002 11:49:11 AM EDT
Originally Posted By dmaas: Twenty guys, if they are pulling with their penises. I am NOT making this up. [url]http://dir.salon.com/sex/world/2001/01/12/airplane/index.html[/url]
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you win. Many DC-8s still have a freon system to cool the cockpit while on the ground. I should know, I work on them.
Link Posted: 8/4/2002 12:37:38 PM EDT
Link Posted: 8/4/2002 1:30:41 PM EDT
Originally Posted By USNJoe: What was the last 707/135 airframe to roll off the Boeing production line and who has it today?
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The last 707 military airframe made was a French E-3A AWACS. It left Boeing Field in Feb of 92. The last KC-135 left Boeing Field in Jan of 1965. The last civilian version of the 707 left Boeing Field in 1977 for Saudia Airlines. The USAF owns the largest "fleet" (although non-flying) of 707's. Where do you think they get the parts to remanufacture KC-135A's into KC-135R's and to keep them flying? Now if I could find an online picture of the dash 80 doing the barrel rool I would be happy.
Link Posted: 8/5/2002 5:07:10 PM EDT
747 wings will deflect 29' before collapsing.
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