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Posted: 7/22/2002 10:29:25 PM EDT
Found a nasty looking lesion on the inside of his back leg thursday. Took him to the vet on friday (this is when my dizzy/blackout spell happened) and a needle biopsy was done. The vet also noted that some of the lymph nodes in his stomach area were swollen. The biopsy results came in today and it is a mast cell tumor. Vet said it probably has spread. Have to take the dog to an oncologist wednesday to see if anything can be done. Since the day I raised him from a puppy he has been my only constant friend for the past 13 years. I have no idea what I am going to do, because I know he will probably have to be put to sleep. I don't want him to have to go through the misery of extensive surgery and chemotherapy. Everything else seems so unimportant to me now. I don't think I could bear to get another dog and have to go through this again.
Link Posted: 7/22/2002 10:42:57 PM EDT
Link Posted: 7/22/2002 11:04:49 PM EDT
Very sorry to hear this, Imbrog. I hope the next doc visit goes as well as can be expected. I know you said that you didn't think you could bear getting another dog, but think about it, ok? Another dog wouldn't be a replacement for this dog, I know that, but think of the comanionship/love to heartache ratio that your dog has provided for you. And thinking selflessly here, think of the companionship/love you provided for your dog. Lots of pups out there that would give their right paw to be kept by someone who loves them. Just an opinion. btw - our family has a 13 yr old mutt too - moves a lot slower than he used to - we love him and his two yr old mutt pup "sister" to death
Link Posted: 7/22/2002 11:05:17 PM EDT
Dont try to treat the cancer, just get him pain relief when necessary and let him live out his remaining time.
Link Posted: 7/22/2002 11:13:34 PM EDT
I feel for you man. My dog was diagnosed with Lymphoma. The treatment (chemo) lasted about a year. (don't even ask what it cost) It's been another year since that ended. Now it looks like the cancer is coming back, but we still have some treatment options. There is plenty of info out there on the web. I learned a lot. Don't give up. The pack and I will be pulling for you. good luck duppy
Link Posted: 7/22/2002 11:22:20 PM EDT
BTW Dogs handle chemo much better than people. During the entire year of treatment my dog never got sick, or had any bad reaction to the drugs. Dogs hair won't fall out or anything like that. But if he's that old it might not be so easy. Tate is right. There are too many good dogs, that need homes and will serve you well. You have to get another one. Until they come out with a security system that can smell and hear the bad guys coming, I'll always have dogs. (3, all from the pound, they're more loyal that way [;)]) still pulling for ya. duppy
Link Posted: 7/23/2002 1:06:30 AM EDT
Sympathies, Imbro. I hope the oncologist has better news.
Link Posted: 7/23/2002 1:16:11 AM EDT
Link Posted: 7/23/2002 2:20:36 AM EDT
I hate to hear that. The one thing about life is none of us get out of it alive. Do what is best for your buddy, if treatment is going to be harsh and protracted I dont know if I would do it depending on if it could give me a total cure for at least a few years. IF its just a matter of slowing down a freight train a little, do the dog a favor and treat the pain and know when to do whats best for HIM. Its about QUALITY of life. The dumped Lab I brought home a few weeks ago has very bad hip displasia and we are going to take him to the Purdue Vet school in a few weeks to see if he is a candidate for hip replacement. If not the vet sez 6 months to a year and he will be having enough pain and problems we will be forced to act.
Link Posted: 7/23/2002 4:25:28 AM EDT
Imbrog, I am so sorry to hear about your dog. It's going to be hard to lose your friend but, in a way, you could consider this a good time to make peace with him leaving you. Do what you can to make him comfortable and then spend as much time with him as you can.... Having taken in stray and abused animals my whole life, I've buried a lot of friends... some at the end of a long life and some way before their time. If my wishes would have made a difference, I would have asked for a little more forewarning... that time that you now have to come to terms with the impending loss. And I know exactly what you mean about not wanting another dog... but don't worry about it one way or the other now. Spend time with your friend. Again, FWIW, I'm sorry.
Link Posted: 7/23/2002 4:43:39 AM EDT
I pretty much feel the same way about my current dog...as I watch her get older and her health deteriorate...Sometimes I think it would be better to have twenty of them and raise them and sell them..That way the cycles of life and loss are regular issues...when you have one who is your best buddy the losses are harder.. Sorry to hear about your buddy..I hope your friend recovers..and you do to. Osprey pretty much said it all...
Link Posted: 7/23/2002 5:15:52 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 7/23/2002 5:16:30 AM EDT by prk]
I want to know how YOU are, too. You OK? Medically, I mean? May I suggest, get another dog now, before you lose this one and get all in the middle of grieving. It would be nice to have a companion through all that.
Link Posted: 7/23/2002 5:26:53 AM EDT
Imbroglio, Knowing some of the struggles you've been through over the last year or so, I can only imagine how close you & your friend are. I too, have lost & buried several very dear friends over the years and I understand all too painfully well what you will be going through. I know it doesn't seem like a blessing to you, but I would have loved to have the opportunity to say "Goodbye" to Bandit and Bridget (the Border & Sheltie collies I've lost.) When they went it was totally unexpected - I just came home and found that they were gone. Painful as it is to put an animal down, I wish I had had the chance to say 'bye to them. I'll pray that God will be with you, to comfort you in your time of loss. Sometimes animals are people, too.
Link Posted: 7/23/2002 5:31:00 AM EDT
Link Posted: 7/23/2002 5:35:54 AM EDT
I am sorry for you and your trusted friend. I know how you feel, because I have been there more than once. I have made mistakes in keep my dogs alive longer than I should have because I didn't want them to die. I let my love for them cloud the reality of the situations and they suffered for it. Try to step back and look at it from the dogs view every once and awhile. You are his god. He will fight for his life if only to please you. That is the hardest lesson I have ever learned was when to let them go. Once again I am sorry for both of ya Good luck
Link Posted: 7/23/2002 5:59:13 AM EDT
Sorry to hear about your companion, [b]Imbroglio[/b]. My own dog, Scooter, is also 13 years old and not in the best of health, so I know that one day soon, I will be getting some bad news from the vet. Call me morbid, or whatever, but I have already picked out his final resting place - my Farm in West Texas. It's been in my family since 1885, so I doubt there's much chance of some stranger taking over the place. Up by the old Homestead, where both my grandmother and my father were born, there is an old storm cellar. It will be right next to that storm cellar that Scooter will be buried, along with a fitting little tombstone. That way I'll always know where he is. Forever. And when I go to meet him, someday, I'll just whistle and my little beagle will come running and we'll walk along the wheatfields, chasing jackrabbits, with his little white 'flag' of a tail, going on before me. [b]Now, [u]that[/u] is a Heaven devoutly to be wished![/b] Eric The(MayTheLordBeWithYouAndYourFriendInTheseDa­ys)Hun[>]:)]
Link Posted: 7/23/2002 6:08:24 AM EDT
Originally Posted By prk: May I suggest, get another dog now, before you lose this one and get all in the middle of grieving. It would be nice to have a companion through all that.
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I think that's a really good suggestion, Imbroglio. Think it through.
Link Posted: 7/23/2002 6:57:16 AM EDT
Link Posted: 7/23/2002 7:01:11 AM EDT
Originally Posted By Imbroglio: Found a nasty looking lesion on the inside of his back leg thursday. Took him to the vet on friday (this is when my dizzy/blackout spell happened) and a needle biopsy was done. The vet also noted that some of the lymph nodes in his stomach area were swollen. The biopsy results came in today and it is a mast cell tumor. Vet said it probably has spread. Have to take the dog to an oncologist wednesday to see if anything can be done. Since the day I raised him from a puppy he has been my only constant friend for the past 13 years. I have no idea what I am going to do, because I know he will probably have to be put to sleep. I don't want him to have to go through the misery of extensive surgery and chemotherapy. Everything else seems so unimportant to me now. I don't think I could bear to get another dog and have to go through this again.
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I'm sorry to hear this. I still remember losing my dog (a Boxer) to cancer as a teenager.
Link Posted: 7/23/2002 7:10:10 AM EDT
Been there done that....just enjoy each other till its time...I'm so sorry.
Link Posted: 7/23/2002 7:17:28 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 7/23/2002 7:18:07 AM EDT by ArmedAggie]
Originally Posted by Confederate Dont try to treat the cancer, just get him pain relief when necessary and let him live out his remaining time.
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I agree completely. I had a collie that I put through chemo and I regret it now. It did prolong her life but it miserable for everyone. I realized after she was gone that I had put her through that misery purely for my benefit and that was wrong. My dog's life was fulfilled just by my being there.
Link Posted: 7/23/2002 7:23:20 AM EDT
Imbroglio, I'm very sorry to hear this. It's hard, I know from experience. I've lost 2 dogs to cancer. After the second dog died, (he was my all-time favorite) I felt as if I might never be able to have another dog. It took 4 years, (my brother told me about a young adult, Alaskan Malamute - Rotweiller mix that needed rescuing) I relented and brought this dog home after meeting him. That was over 2 years ago, and I've come to love this dog and am grateful for his companionship and the healing he's been able to provide. Hang in there, brother.
Link Posted: 7/23/2002 7:30:26 AM EDT
Try not to think about the next dog, or not wanting a next dog. In my opinion that only makes it harder to let this one go when the time comes. It hurts like hell but it will pass as the memories of good times with your dog drown out the painful ones. Now is the best time to try to make as many of those good memories as you can. There's no better reason to spoil that dog rotten. It will help both of you through it.
Link Posted: 7/23/2002 7:44:44 AM EDT
Link Posted: 7/23/2002 9:27:28 AM EDT
I am truly sorry to hear about your dog, Imbroglio. Do your best to keep your (and his) spirits up... thinks could take a turn for the better. I am pulling for the both of you! Eric
Link Posted: 7/23/2002 10:35:56 AM EDT
Sorry about your pal. In exchange for absolute allegiance a dog never asks for anything but a square meal and a scratch behind the ears. Be merciful to your dog and consider his welfare before your own psychological needs. As I get older I have come to realize that if you live long enough everything you love will die. It's just the way of things.
Link Posted: 7/23/2002 12:44:51 PM EDT
I know how you feel, man. When I was a kid, I saw my German Shepherd puppy (1 year old) get hit by a car, right in front of my eyes. The bastard fled the scene, and I was too freaked out, so I didn't consider getting his license plate #. Well, when I went up to her, I saw that her eyes popped out, and that she suffered severe brain trauma. It was weird that she didn't go into cardiac arrest, for she was still breathing the whole time. When I got her to my vet, I knew that she had to be put down, because keeping her alive would only prolong her suffering. I left her in the hospital, and I never turned back. That really sucked...
Link Posted: 7/23/2002 1:07:58 PM EDT
Sorry man, this news really sux. I agree with what others have said about not prolonging the suffering for your own benefit. In the past 3 months I have had 2 dogs die; one I put down because she could no longer walk with her back legs-bad hips and spinal arthritis, the other died after a failed stomach surgery. My advice is after you have made your peace, let your dog die with the dignity that it deserves. Very dificult to do, I know. As far as never getting another dog, don't do that. Everyone should always have a dog in their lives. It really will help the healing. Besides, rescuing one from death row has got to be good for the karma. And womenz like puppies. [:)]
Link Posted: 7/23/2002 1:12:07 PM EDT
I'm sorry to hear the news. I just lost a treasured dog two months ago due to Fibrosarcoma. Her tumor was removed twice and it grew back like wildfire within 5 months. Depending on what kind of tumor it is, or how if it has spread, your dog may be better off enjoying his remaining days if you just treat the symptoms and any pain. Either way, be assured that you'll be together again..... The Rainbow Bridge ------------------ There is a bridge connecting Heaven and Earth. It's called the Rainbow Bridge because of its many colors. Just this side of the Rainbow Bridge, there is a land of meadows, hills, and valleys with lush green grass. When beloved pets die, they go to this place. There is always food and water and warm spring weather, the old and frail are young again, those who are maimed are made whole. They play all day long, with only one thing missing... they are not with the special person who loved them on Earth. So each day they run and play until the day comes, when one suddenly stops playing and looks up...the nose twitches, the ears are up, the eyes are staring, and this one runs from the group. You have been seen. When you and your special friend meet, you take him or her in your arms and embrace. Your face is kissed again and again, and you look once more into the eyes of your trusting and beloved friend. Then together you cross the Rainbow Bridge, never again to be separated.
Link Posted: 7/24/2002 11:14:58 AM EDT
The oncologist was booked today and the earliest appointment I could get for my dog is on August 12. I hope he doesn't get worse before that. For now most of the time he acts his usual self, but sometimes he just looks up at me and I can tell he knows something is wrong. The regular vet has him on steriods, but I don't know if they are doing any good or not. Being unemployed right now has turned into a benefit because now I can spend all of the time I can with him.
Link Posted: 7/24/2002 11:45:41 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 7/24/2002 11:55:57 AM EDT by operatorerror]
Originally Posted By Confederate: Dont try to treat the cancer, just get him pain relief when necessary and let him live out his remaining time.
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I agree. That's what we did with our old dog. Had the surgery done and kept him comfortable and happy. It worked for a couple of years. But eventually his suffering was too much to take. He was a good dog.
Link Posted: 7/24/2002 11:49:54 AM EDT
I had a similar problem to our resident dog at my clinic. I figured I owed it to him to put him down before he suffered...
Link Posted: 7/25/2002 8:29:32 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 7/25/2002 9:03:53 AM EDT by 71-Hour_Achmed]
Ran into this in the news today: [url=http://story.news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=story2&cid=676&e=14&u=/usatoday/20020725/ts_usatoday/4305811]Dog's tale of survival opens door in cancer research[/url]
When researchers heard that Navy [the dog's name] was cancer-free after receiving a cocktail of drugs already approved by the Food and Drug Administration -- Celebrex, tamoxifen (sold as Nolvadex) and doxycycline -- the treatment became known as the Navy Protocol. [...] Recently, a polar bear at the Cleveland Metroparks Zoo developed an angiosarcoma, a tumor of the blood vessel, on its paw. Because the tumor was aggressive, it needed to be removed surgically, and the bear was given a cocktail of anti-angiogenic drugs as a secondary measure. The cocktail, similar to Navy's, consisted of Celebrex, Thalidomide and doxycycline. Bonar says he "mixed the medicine up with something sweet and tasty, like cherry pie filling, and the bear gobbled it up."
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This might at least stabilize the cancer. Try checking with your local veterinary schools (IIRC you're in SoCal, probably a couple nearby) to see if anyone is doing a study -- hey, you might even be able to get the drugs at a reduced cost. Thalidomide and doxycycline are long out of patent protection and so should be cheap -- if you can find the thalidomide, which is heavily restricted in the US. (Try a Mexican pharmacy.) I'm not sure about Celebrex -- I *think* it just ran out of patent protection and is becoming available as a generic RSN, but maybe I'm confusing it with another allergy drug. Looks like one sticking point is that thalidomide is restricted out the wazoo (and in the wazoo) and so isn't cheap. The only online pharmacy I've found that will admit to carrying it charges $10/pill. But it's apparently becoming a common cancer treatment drug (also useful for treating leprosy), so check Mexico. . . . Celebrex is about $45 for 60 days (if you pill-split), and doxycycline is something like ten cents a pill. (Be warned, you can't give your dog any cheese or other calcium-rich food while it's taking doxycycline, at least not if you want the stuff to work.)
Link Posted: 7/25/2002 1:40:10 PM EDT
I had a Springer Spaniel growing up, best dog ever. Doc said she had cancer and needed to be put to sleep. She told us this all from just using hr hands and feeling the lymph nodes. We are practically bringing her in to be put to sleep and the doc goes, well, maybe we should do a test first, and it turns out she didnt have cancer. She died two years ago (about 4 years later). We were devastated when we were told she had cancer, and again when she died. But make SURE they have tests done and that its not just on a doctor's opinion.
Link Posted: 7/26/2002 12:22:43 PM EDT
Originally Posted By 71-Hour_Achmed: Ran into this in the news today: [url=http://story.news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=story2&cid=676&e=14&u=/usatoday/20020725/ts_usatoday/4305811]Dog's tale of survival opens door in cancer research[/url]
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Thanks. I will definitely check into this with the oncologist.
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