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Posted: 7/19/2002 7:47:11 AM EDT
Accuracy, reliability; Is the beam type or the click type better?
Link Posted: 7/19/2002 7:51:19 AM EDT
Good question. I've been thinking about getting an Inch pound type for scope mounting. Loopie sells one but its alot of $$. A cheapy from autozone probably will work just as good. Of course some people insist on Snap on and Craftsman...
Link Posted: 7/19/2002 7:56:16 AM EDT
It's my understanding that the beam-type and dial-type are the most accurate. The click-type are the most convenient when under the hood of the car or when visibility is poor.
Link Posted: 7/19/2002 8:10:50 AM EDT
Which ever type you decide on, please remember that as with most tools, the best tool improperly employed is no better than the poorest quality tool. There are specific techniques to using a torque wrench. READ THE DIRECTIONS that come with your new tool. Vic out.
Link Posted: 7/19/2002 8:17:07 AM EDT
As with most things in life, you get what you pay for. Dial type torque wrenches are the most accurate and the easiest to calibrate. They are also the most expensive. Click type wrenches are less expensive than dial types, can be calibrated, and have the advantage of not needing to see the scale to know when you have reached the torque setting. Beam wrenches are the cheapest, least accurate, and are not usually calibrated beyond just making sure the wrench is not too far off what it says. If it is too far off, it's time for a new one.
Link Posted: 7/19/2002 8:20:40 AM EDT
Originally Posted By gus: As with most things in life, you get what you pay for. Dial type torque wrenches are the most accurate and the easiest to calibrate. They are also the most expensive. Click type wrenches are less expensive than dial types, can be calibrated, and have the advantage of not needing to see the scale to know when you have reached the torque setting. Beam wrenches are the cheapest, least accurate, and are not usually calibrated beyond just making sure the wrench is not too far off what it says. If it is too far off, it's time for a new one.
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And select a wrench so your working range falls near the midpoint of its capacity to insure an accurate reading. And as stated above, you WILL have to have your wrench recalibrated from time to time.
Link Posted: 7/19/2002 8:21:56 AM EDT
Just get the type you like to use. But don't do what I have done . I've pissed away more good money buying less expensive wrenches. No , Sears doesn't warrant theirs for over 1 year. Save your money , chase down a Snap-on truck and fork over the cash. I must have 4 wrenches that I know use as breaker bars 'cause they are crap.
Link Posted: 7/19/2002 8:24:38 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 7/19/2002 8:25:47 AM EDT by platform389]
Originally Posted By sniper1az: Save your money , chase down a Snap-on truck and fork over the cash.
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No need to do that. [url]http://buy.snapon.com/catalog/catalog.asp[/url] My credit card shakes in fear of this site. [img]http://www.stopstart.fsnet.co.uk/smilie/biggrin2.gif[/img]
Link Posted: 7/19/2002 8:25:04 AM EDT
Originally Posted By platform389:
Originally Posted By gus: As with most things in life, you get what you pay for. Dial type torque wrenches are the most accurate and the easiest to calibrate. They are also the most expensive. Click type wrenches are less expensive than dial types, can be calibrated, and have the advantage of not needing to see the scale to know when you have reached the torque setting. Beam wrenches are the cheapest, least accurate, and are not usually calibrated beyond just making sure the wrench is not too far off what it says. If it is too far off, it's time for a new one.
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And select a wrench so your working range falls near the midpoint of its capacity to insure an accurate reading. And as stated above, you WILL have to have your wrench recalibrated from time to time.
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Correct! Also, one of the reasons beam wrenches are not as accurate is they lack scale resolution. A ten ft/lb difference is easily seen on a dial wrench, but is barely perceptible on a beam wrench. The real question is how critical is it to get the exact torgue? Is it enough to simply get all the fastners equally tight or is there an exact amount of torque that needs to be applied?
Link Posted: 7/19/2002 9:06:46 AM EDT
What is a torque wrench? [:E][:E][:E][:E][:E] Just kidding...
Link Posted: 7/19/2002 9:11:06 AM EDT
New to AR, but not new to tools. Lowe's carries Williams tools - which is a division of Snap-On. I bought the 1/2" drive click-type torque wrench when rebuilding my motorcycle, and it cost me $90 instead of the $200+ for the Snap-On. It's just as good. Though Snap-On has the name recognition....
Link Posted: 7/19/2002 9:23:38 AM EDT
What are you going to do or application do you have in mind for this torque wrench? Are you going to rebuild an automotive engine?
Link Posted: 7/19/2002 9:41:08 AM EDT
Link Posted: 7/19/2002 9:46:19 AM EDT
I am putting parts back on my motorcycle, so near exact torques are desired as some of the material might be aluminum. Thanks for the suggestions and opinions so far. It helps.
Link Posted: 7/19/2002 10:00:43 AM EDT
Link Posted: 7/19/2002 11:55:05 AM EDT
Since this is AR15.com, my guess is that you want the wrench for barrels. Get a cheap beam type . The accuracy window is wide. I use a beam wrenchfor that purpose and to torque lug nuts on my vehicles. It's a Caftsman I've had for 35 years. Also have a click type for the aluminum block stuff where you can't see the beam. With aluminum blocks and heads "tight enough" and "stripped" are to close together to guess at.
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