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Posted: 7/16/2002 1:22:41 PM EDT
Ok, with all the talk about MBs lately I pulled mine out of storage and started riding to work. Here's the problem when I bought my GT Rebound it had a tiny a$$ wedgy seat that I replaced at the time of sale with a wider (2x) gel seat. Now with riding again my butt is so sore I feel like a Catholic choir boy. Part of it is the fact I haven't ridden in so long my body is not used to it and the other is the damn bumps I hit. Is there a quality shock absorbing seat? I would like one of those seat posts with a shock in it or something. Also, can my bike be modded for disc brakes? Thanks! BrenLover
Link Posted: 7/16/2002 1:31:02 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 7/19/2002 6:23:58 PM EDT by redray]
i believe that most bikes can be modded for dick brakes, the only setback being frame design and $$. you have to change the front and rear hubs to accept the discs, and you have to mount the "brake housing" to the frame. as far as the bumps are concerned, rockshox sells seatposts; also if you get an older model front shock, youll save some more $$. use the saved $$ to buy ammo.
Link Posted: 7/16/2002 1:31:36 PM EDT
Negative on the ass cushion seat. Your seat should NOT feel like a pillow (ever notice that the most comfortable car seats, Mercedes and the like, feel like rocks at first but allow you to sit all day and be comfortable). It will take a little time but your butt will adjust to a proper seat in about a week. It should be adjusted (and be made) so that you sit on your "sits" bones. My seat on my rather boney butt is pretty much rock hard (it's a Selle Italia "Flite") and narrow but is actually very comfortable. A suspension seatpost may help if you have a bad back but other than that is a waste (IMO). Look up the disc brake post of last week; pretty much covered those bases there.
Link Posted: 7/16/2002 1:31:40 PM EDT
did i type dick brakes? lol. see what happens when you scratch yourself while typing?
Link Posted: 7/16/2002 3:55:45 PM EDT
I read the other post but I dont know what to look for on my bike to tell if it is Disc capable. BrenLover
Link Posted: 7/16/2002 3:57:46 PM EDT
On saddles: You don't really sit on a bike saddle, you straddle it while you pedal. If you find you're trying to sit and enjoy the ride, you will experience pain. The saddle is designed with minimalism in mind because the wider and softer you go the more it interferes with peddling. Next is the issue of what you are wearing, normal jeans and underwear cause a lot of rubbing to occur. Wearing bike shorts and nothing underneath them allows the chamois pad of the short to cushion and perform it's job of absorbing and wicking sweat allowing the skin a better chance to avoid chafing. Pedaling out of the saddle, and applying force to the pedals every now and then allows your weight to shift away from being solely supported by the seat and gives relief. Try not to go the softie route in easing your pain, instead try to log some miles and get your rear end conditioned.
Link Posted: 7/16/2002 4:26:20 PM EDT
My mom has one of those very gooey Spenco gel saddle covers on one of her bikes, and she loves the thing. Nice and soft. The bike is very comfortable to ride, but, then again, she's not really a singletrack rider as much as one who pedals to the market on Saturday morning to buy fresh flowers and honey. I do know the feeling of a sore, well, how do we say it? Perineum? You've probably got a more descriptive term for it. . . goes by "sandbar" or "cuttlefish" around here. I haven't got one of the anatomically correct seats that reduce contact with perineum, but am aware of a study in the "Journal of Urology" that suggested that prolonged pressure, prolonged compression, of the area has been linked to erectile dysfunction. Just something to consider if you're in the market for a new saddle. Take one for a spin before you buy?
Link Posted: 7/16/2002 4:50:09 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 7/16/2002 4:51:54 PM EDT by magnum_99]
Originally Posted By punkatomic: On saddles: You don't really sit on a bike saddle, you straddle it while you pedal. If you find you're trying to sit and enjoy the ride, you will experience pain. The saddle is designed with minimalism in mind because the wider and softer you go the more it interferes with peddling. Next is the issue of what you are wearing, normal jeans and underwear cause a lot of rubbing to occur. Wearing bike shorts and nothing underneath them allows the chamois pad of the short to cushion and perform it's job of absorbing and wicking sweat allowing the skin a better chance to avoid chafing. Pedaling out of the saddle, and applying force to the pedals every now and then allows your weight to shift away from being solely supported by the seat and gives relief. Try not to go the softie route in easing your pain, instead try to log some miles and get your rear end conditioned.
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Said better than I could at the time. Having said what I did, if you just want to ride to the store or cruise around casually I suppose one of the cushy gel monsters would be fine--especially on an upright cruiser type bike where constant pedaling is not an issue. As far as dics go, you need disc capable hubs (and of course the discs, caliper, levers) [b]AND[/b] bosses on your forks and bosses somewhere on your rear triangle or suspension (whatever you may have). No bosses = no caliper mounting location.
Link Posted: 7/17/2002 3:37:32 PM EDT
Rather than changing the saddle, you might want to consider a suspended seatpost.
Link Posted: 7/17/2002 4:14:04 PM EDT
What is a suspended seat post? BrenLover
Link Posted: 7/17/2002 4:24:48 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 7/17/2002 4:26:47 PM EDT by garandman]
Originally Posted By SorryOciffer: What is a suspended seat post? BrenLover
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Its a seat post (post that the seat is attached to) with some sort of suspension in it to minimize the shock. I've been considering getting one myself. As far as disk brakes go (based on what others have told me) if you are riding on either pavement or hard pack dirt, they prolly aren't worth it. If you brakes still seem weak, upgrade you present brakes - new cables, pads, etc. BTW, I also WAS experiencing the "arse a-fire" thing you describe above. It goes away, as you log some ride time (keeping in mind, a mtn bike was never intended to have its rider in the saddle 100% of the time) Stand up and peddle harder. [:D]
Link Posted: 7/17/2002 4:30:59 PM EDT
I think a suspended seat post is the answer. Can anyone recommend one? The thing is peddling standing up is not as good exercise as sitting and doing it as you force your legs do the work instead of making your body weaight do it. BrenLover
Link Posted: 7/17/2002 4:33:51 PM EDT
Originally Posted By SorryOciffer: I think a suspended seat post is the answer. Can anyone recommend one? The thing is peddling standing up is not as good exercise as sitting and doing it as you force your legs do the work instead of making your body weaight do it. BrenLover
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Just remember - your knee should NEVER bend more than 90 degrees when peddling. It'll ruin your knees. If need be, raise your seat. I'd also be interested in suspension seatpost recommendations.
Link Posted: 7/17/2002 4:35:57 PM EDT
Originally Posted By SorryOciffer: I think a suspended seat post is the answer. Can anyone recommend one? The thing is peddling standing up is not as good exercise as sitting and doing it as you force your legs do the work instead of making your body weaight do it. BrenLover
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Try here to find a good one: [url]http://www.mtbr.com/reviews/suspension_seatpost/[/url] Some place with good prices online are: [url]www.jensonusa.com[/url] and [url]www.pricepoint.com[/url]
Link Posted: 7/17/2002 4:40:51 PM EDT
As I understand it your seat is positioned correctly when the pedal is at BDC your leg should be completely straight with your pedalfoot flat. Thanks for the link Cerberus.. BrenLover
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