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Posted: 7/7/2002 8:55:19 PM EDT
Link Posted: 7/7/2002 8:58:54 PM EDT
Link Posted: 7/7/2002 9:00:30 PM EDT
[img]www.ar15.com/members/albums/1GUNRUNNER%2Fdinn%2Ejpg[/img]
Link Posted: 7/7/2002 9:01:39 PM EDT
Link Posted: 7/7/2002 9:01:40 PM EDT
Originally Posted By DoubleFeed: What is tri-tip?
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Whatever it is; it would taste better cooked!
Link Posted: 7/7/2002 9:03:45 PM EDT
Think you got enough pepper on that?
Link Posted: 7/7/2002 9:08:28 PM EDT
Nice grips on the 1911, what kind of wood is that?
Link Posted: 7/7/2002 9:43:39 PM EDT
WHAT? "tri-tip marinated in teriyaki sauce" You have to be kidding! Tri-Tip deserves to be slow cooked over Red Oak coals, marinated in only salt, fresh ground pepper and fresh ground garlic! Santa Maria, Ca is the Tri-Tip capital of the world! Some people cook it very rare, I like it done so there is a little bit of pink in the center. Since I can't get Red Oak up here I'll BBQ it over Mesquite. And for a change-up I'll lay on some BBQ sauce for the last 5 minutes of cooking. Tri-tip is a triangular piece cut from the bottom of beef sirloin. Butchers like Dykes refer to tri-tip as "bottom sirloin," part of the top sirloin and part of the sirloin tip. "In the old days," he explains, "the butchers had a cut they called the 'standard cut' which had top sirloin on one side, the bone in the middle, then the filet, and the tail part was the tri-tip. Only nobody knew it." Somebody who did know it was a Texas meat man whom Dykes remembers as "Mr. Tri-tip." He brought tri-tip to California "by the truckload, tons of it. But he couldn't sell it, so it was used for hamburger. " The breakthrough, according to local barbecuers, came in the late 1950s when Santa Maria butcher Bob Schutz innocently placed the end cut seasoned with salt, pepper and garlic salt on a rack in his rotisserie. Forty-five minutes later he shared it with fellow workers who were amazed at its unique texture and flavor. Schutz promoted his "tri-tip" and taught customers how to prepare it. Williams Brothers picked up the idea and began to market tri-tip through its Central Coast stores where customers quickly came to appreciate its taste and, at least at that time, low price compared to other cuts of beef.
Link Posted: 7/7/2002 9:51:05 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 7/7/2002 9:51:36 PM EDT by Citabria7GCBC]
Originally Posted By Big_Bear: Well, the little lady was in the mood for tri-tip tonight, so who am I to argue with that? [;)] I told her if she bought it I'd cook it. Nuthin' fancy, just tri-tip marinated in teriyaki sauce, rice, corn on the cob, and salad. And of course, in the tradition of lordtrader, TREETOP, brouhaha, Imbroglio... etal... a gun on the side. Tonight's dinner gun is brought to you by Springfield Armory, cocked and locked and ready to rock! [:D] [img]www.ar15.com/members/albums/Big%5FBear%2F1911A1dinner%2Ejpg[/img]
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damn that looks good! you leave your gun cocked when you eat?
Link Posted: 7/7/2002 9:52:35 PM EDT
Link Posted: 7/7/2002 11:23:36 PM EDT
Link Posted: 7/7/2002 11:30:45 PM EDT
Dammit, its the middle of the night and now Im starving, Im gonna go cook a steak.. My neighbors are gonna say "Oh theres the crazy guy again, BBQ'n at 2AM in his boxers, with some kind of big gun.."
Link Posted: 7/7/2002 11:34:37 PM EDT
Originally Posted By MAHABALI: Dammit, its the middle of the night and now Im starving, Im gonna go cook a steak.. My neighbors are gonna say "Oh theres the crazy guy again, BBQ'n at 2AM in his boxers, with some kind of big gun.."
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Had the same idea. Just BBQ'd myself some chicken a few minutes ago. Keving67
Link Posted: 7/8/2002 7:52:57 AM EDT
Originally Posted By MAHABALI: My neighbors are gonna say "Oh theres the crazy guy again, BBQ'n at 2AM in his boxers, with some kind of big gun.."
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and a rifle!" [;)]
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