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3/20/2017 5:03:23 PM
Posted: 6/27/2002 5:31:37 AM EDT
I've got a Sentry el-cheapo 14 gun safe that I need to secure to the concrete slab in my garage (via the holes in the bottom), anyone know how to do this? I assume I need to drill holes into the concrete but I'm unsure how to secure the bolts into the concrete. Anyone have any experience in this? How are the threads created? Tips? Please? Can ya a guy out?
Link Posted: 6/27/2002 5:33:58 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 6/27/2002 5:40:15 AM EDT by Benjamin0001]
You need lag bolts.. There will be a bolt and a cylinder. You push the cylinder (which has threads inside it) into the holes move your safe over the holes and screw it down... You will have to drill the holes to fit the cylinder... GO look at your local hardware store to see if they have the right size.. [url]http://www.confast.com/productCategory.asp?productType=1[/url] [img]http://www.confast.com/prod_pics/9.gif[/img]
Link Posted: 6/27/2002 5:34:05 AM EDT
You'll need a hammer drill like a Hilti and a couple of concrete anchors. You put the anchors into the holes and use a punch like tool to "set" them by flaring out the bottom.
Link Posted: 6/27/2002 5:37:00 AM EDT
Link Posted: 6/27/2002 5:37:02 AM EDT
Link Posted: 6/27/2002 5:38:56 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 6/27/2002 5:42:51 AM EDT by Stormbringer]
Go to any hardware store and get anchor bolt inserts. You drill the hole in the floor with a concrete drill bit( hammer drill helps too) drop in the insert. Place safe. Then put in the bolts that come with the inserts. As you thread the bolts in the insert spreads out at the bottom to act as an anchor ( hence the name anchor bolt) Here is more info than you would ever want! [url]http://www.confast.com/general_info.htm[/url]
Link Posted: 6/27/2002 5:39:47 AM EDT
Don't worry about having to thread the concrete -- that won't work. But your local hardware store should have several different styles of bolts that are specifically designed to anchor in concrete. The different styles are rated for different load levels. Think carefully about where you'll be placing the bolts; once they're locked into the concrete, the only way to remove them is to either chip away the concrete or to cut them off flush with something like a Dremel tool.
Link Posted: 6/27/2002 5:45:26 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 6/27/2002 5:46:16 AM EDT by Stormbringer]
Thats a good point Renamed. My father in law once blew that and it was a big PITA!! It also impossible to move them if your hole is not deep enough. To solve it easliy place some masking tape on your drill bit to mark the depth you want to go to. Then drill till the tape hits the floor...
Link Posted: 6/27/2002 5:49:54 AM EDT
Think carefully about where you'll be placing the bolts; once they're locked into the concrete, the only way to remove them is to either chip away the concrete or to cut them off flush with something like a Dremel tool.
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Renamed, Are you saying that once the bolts are screwed into the sleeve, they can't be unscrewed? Or are you saying that the sleeve cannot be removed once its expanded?
Link Posted: 6/27/2002 5:57:40 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 6/27/2002 5:59:07 AM EDT by Stormbringer]
The sleeve cannot be removed.. The bolts come out no problem at all. However I always put in a few drops of oil to reduce corrosion.....That can be a pain if they rust lock. Renamed is talking about your bolt holes that you make matching the bolt pattern on the bottom of your safe... Measure twice then once again for good luck before you drill!
Link Posted: 6/27/2002 6:07:31 AM EDT
May want to give some thought about water in your garage. Do you wash the floor or merely sweep it out ? What about water dripping off your vehicles that may share this space ? Might want to get the safe up on some type of water proof spacers so the safe won't rust out and /or damage your firearms.
Link Posted: 6/27/2002 6:08:54 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 6/27/2002 6:10:10 AM EDT by Slacker]
I got it, thanks S.B. I'll use a marker to trace the hole from inside the safe, can't go wrong that way...but I'm sure I'll find a way to screw it up. BTW, this safe will be in the garage (easily broken into) so I don't plan on using it as the main safe, just a little extra insurance. Should it be put against a wall or be freestanding? Against a wall seems like the obvious answer (harder to push over) but being against an exterior wall seems a little too inviting. Aluminum sideing and drywall don't offer much security....
Link Posted: 6/27/2002 6:20:49 AM EDT
Link Posted: 6/27/2002 7:00:17 AM EDT
I spent four years on the road drilling holes in concrete floors to mount equipment, including in earthquake zones like California. As Sweep said, rent a quality hammerdrill since they cost $400-500 for a good one, and you'll rarely use the hammer function. Black and Decker makes a good one, and it uses standard SAE sized bits, as opposed to Hilti which uses proprietary metric bits. Hilti also makes excellent anchors, but they'd probably be overkill in your situation. Redheads, as osprey21 mentioned, are good quality concrete anchors. Before you start putting holes in your floor, you need to find out if you're on a post-tension slab floor. The last thing you want to do is cut a cable and destroy your slab. Different anchors require different depth holes. If you only have to drill a 2" deep hole, you should be okay even on a post-tension slab, but your mileage may vary. Good luck.
Link Posted: 6/27/2002 7:23:09 AM EDT
I would put the safe against the wall anyway.. For one you save room in your garage and if you are like me garage space is a premium. As for security?? Well what would keep them from cuttting through the siding and drywall to get into your garage then attack your safe from the inside? NOTHING!! So there is no real advantage to having it freestanding.
Link Posted: 6/27/2002 8:07:36 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 6/27/2002 9:45:53 AM EDT by Helldog40]
Link Posted: 6/27/2002 8:28:03 AM EDT
One more suggestion. If you use the suggestions above the bolts will be very secure, however the floor of the safe will be only marginal. Place a large diameter flat washer between the floor of the safe and the bolt head. The will increase surface area around the bolt head and make the bolt head less likely to pull through the safe floor if a pry bar or jack is used to move the safe. At about 15 cents each cheap insurance.
Link Posted: 6/27/2002 8:28:48 AM EDT
I'm in the same boat myself... I'll soon be anchoring the same safe to the concrete floor of a closet in a 3rd flor condo. Should I epoxy the anchors into the floor, or is that overkill?
Link Posted: 6/27/2002 9:16:04 AM EDT
Originally Posted By mr_camera_man: I'm in the same boat myself... I'll soon be anchoring the same safe to the concrete floor of a closet in a 3rd flor condo. Should I epoxy the anchors into the floor, or is that overkill?
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helluva good question! I hadn't considered using epoxy (liquid nails comes to mind) to ensure that the "sleeve" stays in the concrete. Using washers was assumed. I think the safe comes with bolts but I may want a larger diameter. I remember awhile back someone posted pics of their safe after an attempted break in. It was all beat to snot, S&G lock busted clean off etc. But it held. Mine is no-where near that quality and it only weighs 350 lbs so all the more reason to secure it extra good. I'm going to put a sign on it that says "ATTN: Fire department! This safe contains loose gunpowder." That should deter anyone with a Sawz-all...
Link Posted: 6/27/2002 9:27:37 AM EDT
Another tip: Carefully mark the locations you're going to drill the holes with a centerpunch, and be very steady and sure that you don't let the bit "walk" while you're drilling. It's no fun to have to move the whole thing over and redrill two holes because you can't get the thing to line up. Ask me how I know. [>Q]
Link Posted: 6/27/2002 9:39:55 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 6/27/2002 9:40:25 AM EDT by Slacker]
Originally Posted By Jarhead_22: Another tip: Carefully mark the locations you're going to drill the holes with a centerpunch, and be very steady and sure that you don't let the bit "walk" while you're drilling. It's no fun to have to move the whole thing over and redrill two holes because you can't get the thing to line up. Ask me how I know. [>Q]
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OK, how do you know? [:)] Seriously, thanks for the warning. That sounds exactly like something that I would do...
Link Posted: 6/27/2002 11:18:29 AM EDT
Originally Posted By spraynpray: One more suggestion. If you use the suggestions above the bolts will be very secure, however the floor of the safe will be only marginal. Place a large diameter flat washer between the floor of the safe and the bolt head. The will increase surface area around the bolt head and make the bolt head less likely to pull through the safe floor if a pry bar or jack is used to move the safe. At about 15 cents each cheap insurance.
View Quote
I'm going to suggest going one better. I'd reinforce the bottom with some 1/2 steel plate, drilled to match the holes in the bottom of the safe. If you just use the standard holes and bolts, it's be faily easy to tip the safe and tear through the holes on the bottom. Second the idea that you lag it to the wall. Makes it that much tougher to tip over. Take some pics and let us know how it went.
Link Posted: 6/27/2002 11:54:51 AM EDT
Lag it to the wall? The wall is unfinished (wall studs w/exterior drywall covered by siding) no insulation etc. How would I lag the safe to the wall? Good call on using 1/2 plate on the bottom of the safe. I may do that. I'm also going to obtain two "L" shaped 1/2 pieces of steel and bolt those to the sides and to the floor. That should firm it up a bit.
Link Posted: 6/27/2002 12:00:12 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Slacker: Lag it to the wall? The wall is unfinished (wall studs w/exterior drywall covered by siding) no insulation etc. How would I lag the safe to the wall? Good call on using 1/2 plate on the bottom of the safe. I may do that. I'm also going to obtain two "L" shaped 1/2 pieces of steel and bolt those to the sides and to the floor. That should firm it up a bit.
View Quote
Try lining the holes in the back of the safe with the studs on the wall and use lag bolts with large washers. Better than nothing and will help prevent tipping.
Link Posted: 6/27/2002 12:13:19 PM EDT
If you REALLY want to get medieval, bolt the safe to the floor, about 8" out from the wall. Plug the unused bolt holes. Surround the safe with plywood forms, standing the sides out about 6", and making the height about 6" taller than the safe. Use a silicone sealer to hold the front plywood panel flush with the door of the safe. Construct a cage with rebar that surrounds the safe, leaving the front open. You can go cheap and use chain-link fence cut to size, or omit it altogether. Get about 15 bags of Sakrete concrete mix, a large plastic kiddie pool, some 5 gallon plastic pails, gloves and a case of beer. Friends would be helpful at this point. Mix the concrete and use pails to fill the form from the top. Level with a trowel when you reach the top of the form. Suggested modifications: 1. Drill two small holes in the top of the safe to accomodate fittings and some 1/4" copper tubing. Run the tubing straig out the top, about 4" above the anticipated concrete level. Drill a small hole in the bottom side of the safe and thread a heavy duty extension cord through. Seal hole with silicone. This will allow some small amount of air circulation and you can run a goldenrod to eliminate moisture. 2. Affix 2 large hardened eyebolts at the sides of the safe before you pour. Use them to attach a "lock bar" across the front for extra protection. Use two sets, top and bottom. This is all kind of like polishing a turd, but it's cheaper than buying a better safe.
Link Posted: 6/27/2002 12:42:47 PM EDT
Link Posted: 6/27/2002 1:20:08 PM EDT
Sorry to get off topic a little Slacker, but since you got all the safe guy's on this thread... Does anyone know if stair walkers are rented out?
Link Posted: 6/27/2002 1:52:34 PM EDT
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