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3/20/2017 5:03:23 PM
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Posted: 6/17/2002 4:26:56 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 6/17/2002 4:28:34 PM EDT by Sweep]
Link Posted: 6/17/2002 4:27:52 PM EDT
10
Link Posted: 6/17/2002 4:29:45 PM EDT
Link Posted: 6/17/2002 4:31:26 PM EDT
Link Posted: 6/17/2002 4:33:38 PM EDT
a negative times a negative is a positive. i.e. (-1)^2 = (-1)*(-1) = 1 and (-2)*(-1) = 2 therefore, 1+2+7 = 10 Keving67
Link Posted: 6/17/2002 4:34:37 PM EDT
Link Posted: 6/17/2002 4:35:09 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 6/17/2002 4:37:48 PM EDT by ronin47]
Sweep, (-1)^2 = +1 -2(-1) = +2 Therefore, f(-1) = (-1)^2 - 2(-1) + 7 f(-1) = 1 + 2 + 7 f(-1) = 10 Don't see how it can be anything else. If you came up with something else, I submit that you made an error. Perhaps if you "show your work," we can determine where you went wrong.
Link Posted: 6/17/2002 4:38:35 PM EDT
I got 10 too. What do you get if you intergrate that function?
Link Posted: 6/17/2002 4:41:23 PM EDT
Link Posted: 6/17/2002 4:42:23 PM EDT
Originally Posted By JIMBEAM: I got 10 too. What do you get if you intergrate that function?
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(1/3)x^3 - x^2 + 7x evaluated at x = (-1) = -25/3 Keving67
Link Posted: 6/17/2002 4:44:48 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Sweep: -1^2 = -1 because it's actually -(1)^2 or -1(1)^2
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Sorry, you can't pull out the negative sign because it is x (-1) and you must square x You've been living a lie! sorry man Keving67
Link Posted: 6/17/2002 4:45:32 PM EDT
Link Posted: 6/17/2002 4:50:52 PM EDT
Link Posted: 6/17/2002 4:51:47 PM EDT
Dude, your mathematics teacher screwed you up... OUCH....
Link Posted: 6/17/2002 4:52:26 PM EDT
Link Posted: 6/17/2002 4:56:43 PM EDT
(-1)^2 is the same as (-1)*(-1) both equal 1
Link Posted: 6/17/2002 4:59:27 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 6/17/2002 4:59:56 PM EDT by ColonelKlink]
Link Posted: 6/17/2002 5:09:14 PM EDT
I took calculus in high school, and if I get something like this wrong, my teacher, if still around, would probably smack me on the head! I can guarantee you that everybody else is right. 10 is the answer.
Link Posted: 6/17/2002 5:40:13 PM EDT
Link Posted: 6/17/2002 5:50:28 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Sweep: Thanks for the help guys. But for the record, if you just have -1^2, is it considered -(1^2) which will = -1? I know there is something like that.
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Only if the negative sign is outside like this -(x), otherwise you are squaring negative one. Order of Operations.
Link Posted: 6/17/2002 5:52:38 PM EDT
i got ten. and yes, sweep, you would get -1 for your second question if it were -(1)
Link Posted: 6/17/2002 5:57:38 PM EDT
10
Link Posted: 6/17/2002 6:25:27 PM EDT
But for the record, if you just have -1^2, is it considered -(1^2) which will = -1?
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No. anything^2 = anything * anything So, from your example: -1^2 = -1 * -1 = 1 To extend this one step further, any negative number to an even power is positive. Any negative number to an odd power is negative. Example -1^3 = -1 * -1 * -1 = -1. Of course what do I know? I didn't even start high school, much less finish it.z
Link Posted: 6/17/2002 6:31:57 PM EDT
Hey Sweep, I got 8. J/K....[:D] Puahahaha!!
Link Posted: 6/17/2002 6:58:49 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Sweep: Thanks for the help guys. But for the record, if you just have -1^2, is it considered -(1^2) which will = -1? I know there is something like that.
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(-1)^2 is not considered the same as the -(1^2). -(x^2) is considered -1*(x^2), so for any real number x, the solution is negative, as you indicated. Without the parenthesis it is considered (-1)^2. A basic algebraic rule is that for any number (positive or negative), when it is squared the result is only positive. This is used often in formula to ensure that you do not try to get square roots of negative numbers. Which brings up something to help stir your memory: what is the square root of a negative number? It may be vague memories if this which is causing you grief. That is noted by the lower case "i", where "i" = SQRT(-1), and is called an imaginary number. Are the painful memories coming back yet?[}:D]
Link Posted: 6/17/2002 7:08:06 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 6/17/2002 7:13:55 PM EDT by Sweep]
Link Posted: 6/17/2002 7:17:14 PM EDT
Link Posted: 6/17/2002 7:27:18 PM EDT
x=0
Link Posted: 6/17/2002 8:26:55 PM EDT
I got ten also. But I copied off of Zoom.
Link Posted: 6/19/2002 11:47:42 AM EDT
The correct answer for everything is 42. [:D]
Link Posted: 6/19/2002 11:51:05 AM EDT
Originally Posted By Mute: The correct answer for everything is 42. [:D]
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Hitchhikers Guide to the Galaxy?
Link Posted: 6/19/2002 11:54:01 AM EDT
Link Posted: 6/19/2002 11:55:17 AM EDT
A billion. What do I win? TheRedGoat
Link Posted: 6/19/2002 12:00:06 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Sweep: 8 Here's why: -1^2 = -1 because it's actually -(1)^2 or -1(1)^2 In the original function, if -1^2 was to come out as +1, it should be (x)^2 - 2x + 7. If it was (-1)^2, then it would come out as 10, but there's nothing to indicate the "-" is inclusive in -1^2, therefor I say 8! The reason I say this is because I got a very similar problem like this wrong on an exam in my college algebra class. The professor convince me this was the correct way to square negative numbers. Don't tell me for the past 10 years I've been living a lie!
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Your problem is that you are substituting -1 for x in the equation when you should be substituting (-1).
Link Posted: 6/19/2002 12:06:07 PM EDT
I got Klingon.... Scott [beer]
Link Posted: 6/19/2002 2:03:20 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 6/19/2002 2:04:03 PM EDT by USNA91]
I got an answer that proved Einstein was dumb as post..... But my dog ate the paper..... [:D]
Link Posted: 6/19/2002 2:05:12 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Sweep: Oh, here's one for ya: When does x^0 not = 1? [:D]
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When x = 0?
Link Posted: 6/19/2002 2:08:29 PM EDT
Originally Posted By USNA91:
Originally Posted By Sweep: Oh, here's one for ya: When does x^0 not = 1? [:D]
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When x = 0?
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I think I remember this from my calc classes. is it infinity? Keving67
Link Posted: 6/19/2002 2:13:57 PM EDT
I doubt it. You can't really plug infinity into an equation since it's not really a number.
Link Posted: 6/19/2002 2:24:18 PM EDT
Okay, I'll admit stupidity. I know what > means, and what < means, but what is the ^ symbol in x^2
Link Posted: 6/19/2002 2:26:05 PM EDT
Link Posted: 6/19/2002 2:33:22 PM EDT
Ok my turn, how will any of this shit help your child get a job later in life? anyone? [beer]
Link Posted: 6/19/2002 2:35:52 PM EDT
Originally Posted By HighlandMac: Ok my turn, how will any of this shit help your child get a job later in life? anyone? [beer]
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If he or she goes into science or engineering, they damn well better know algebra like the back of their hand. Even things that often don't require the use of algebra directly, such as programming, rely on logic skills that are developed by learning mathematics.
Link Posted: 6/19/2002 2:40:07 PM EDT
Originally Posted By BostonTeaParty:
Originally Posted By HighlandMac: Ok my turn, how will any of this shit help your child get a job later in life? anyone? [beer]
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If he or she goes into science or engineering, they damn well better know algebra like the back of their hand. Even things that often don't require the use of algebra directly, such as programming, rely on logic skills that are developed by learning mathematics.
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hehe, hey mister bridge builder...you know algebra right? Al...ge...bra?
Link Posted: 6/19/2002 2:42:43 PM EDT
Originally Posted By BostonTeaParty:
Originally Posted By HighlandMac: Ok my turn, how will any of this shit help your child get a job later in life? anyone? [beer]
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If he or she goes into science or engineering, they damn well better know algebra like the back of their hand. Even things that often don't require the use of algebra directly, such as programming, rely on logic skills that are developed by learning mathematics.
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I think the hardest thing about Calculus was the algebra.
Link Posted: 6/19/2002 2:43:50 PM EDT
if it was: f(-1) = -x^2 - 2x + 7 it be 8 but when you plug -1 in x its like a built in parenthesis so you get f(-1) = (-1)^2 - 2(-1) + 7 = 10 Either you don't recognize the problem when you took it in math class or you got screwed out of 10 points and the teacher isn't bright...
Link Posted: 6/19/2002 4:16:12 PM EDT
Algebra is simply a tool of deductive logic developed by mathematicians to simplify the math. Personally, I didn't like the way math was taught, because algebra stresses one aspect of logic, and have relatively fixed rules in the way most algebraic equations are solved in school. I think they should teach algebra and geometry simultaneously along with number theory to high school students. It develops their mathematical skills more comprehensively that way.
Link Posted: 6/19/2002 4:32:17 PM EDT
Originally Posted By USNA91: I doubt it. You can't really plug infinity into an equation since it's not really a number.
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uhhh, this guy [img]http://www-gap.dcs.st-and.ac.uk/~history/BigPictures/Cantor.jpeg[/img] would disagree.
Link Posted: 6/19/2002 5:48:02 PM EDT
Yeah well Cantor also introduced unbounded sets. I wonder what this guy would have to say about that. [img]http://www-gap.dcs.st-and.ac.uk/~history/BigPictures/Russell_5.jpeg[/img]
Link Posted: 6/19/2002 6:00:30 PM EDT
Link Posted: 6/19/2002 6:01:29 PM EDT
Hey, nobody's perfect (he also died in a nut house).
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