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4/25/2017 7:42:44 PM
Posted: 5/30/2002 8:30:00 AM EDT
I considering starting a legal video service business. With the new technology in CD-ROM, DVD, and video editing, I'm wondering if a service that provides video taping of depositions, wills, "day in the life" evidence, forensics, and a studio for taping depositions would be welcomed in the legal community. I've done some looking and there are very few businesses of this specialty beyond typical court reporting/transcription. I could provide video on DVD with rolling transcripts with the new technology.
Link Posted: 5/30/2002 8:38:38 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 5/30/2002 8:39:18 AM EDT by gravitynoodle]
Thats sounds promising. Many moons ago, court stenography was the norm, but that has been phased out in many areas by voice-activated camera systems that automatically videotape whoever is speaking. The possible downside w/ DVD is that its a relatively new technology and I doubt that many attorneys and/or courts are equipped to play them. No question but thats what the future holds, IMO, especially when recordable DVDs are mass-marketed. The VHS tape will go the way of the 8-track. You'd be ahead of the curve. Go for it.
Link Posted: 5/30/2002 9:37:39 AM EDT
Here in Kali, the court reported lobby is VERY strong. There have been some experiments in electronic recording of court proceedings, but I can't remember the last time I was in such a courtroom. I occasionally take a video deposition when somebody is not going to be around for trial, and I ned the jury to SEE them. Problem with video/electronic is in it's intended use. In a printed depo, I can find and read the key question and answer and go right to it, I haven't seen video with that capability, plus I still have to pay for a reporter to transcribe it anyway. In will and prenuptuals, however, I understand that there is an increasing use of video to film what occurred when the 20 year old bippy marries the rich 55 year old and signs paper that says she agrees to a set amount in case of a divorce. Don't know what the market/provider situation is like, maybe call some lawyers in the book and ask them what they think. Good luck.
Link Posted: 5/30/2002 9:43:34 AM EDT
Originally Posted By CITADELGRAD87: Problem with video/electronic is in it's intended use. In a printed depo, I can find and read the key question and answer and go right to it, I haven't seen video with that capability, plus I still have to pay for a reporter to transcribe it anyway.
View Quote
Theoretically, he could define each question or topic as a "chapter" and the user could go directly/instantly to that point on the DVD.
Link Posted: 5/30/2002 10:01:47 AM EDT
Link Posted: 5/31/2002 1:21:09 AM EDT
Thanks, it kinda sounds like the old fashioned printed transcript and audio tape as currently done by Court Reporters and Stenographers is preferred. The CD-ROM and DVD has advantages that I can see but change is sometimes difficult. Here in my area, I've noticed in high profile trials the prosecutors like using high-tech new media for their closing presentations. I guess this has a way of condemning the accused in a manner like it was on TV and more fascinating to the juror.
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