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4/25/2017 7:42:44 PM
Posted: 5/23/2002 12:14:01 PM EDT
Does anyone know where to get and how to apply lacquer sealer to reloads? I thought about thinning some lacquer and brushing it on the primer area for longer storage. Any suggestions?
Link Posted: 5/23/2002 12:51:45 PM EDT
Lacquer sealing reloads is easy, both for the primer as well as the bullet/case junction. Look at it as being similar to using silicone caulk. I use a sewing needle to apply it, after the round has been assembled. Mix 2 to 1 lacquer to thinner and it should work well. Don't over-do it, as a little goes a long way. Another important item is that the round must be CLEAN. No oil, powder residue or dirt AT ALL. Otherwise the lacquer will flake off of the round and the purpose isn't served. I would suggest that you only lacquer rounds which will be stored for a long period of time, or will see exposure to the elements for more than a few days. Of course, if there is any chance of exposure to moisture, then by all means, seal them up. I hand-load my 30.06 rounds for target shooting, but use them soon after I assemble them, so I don't use lacquer very often. Mostly, I lacquer the rounds when I give them as gifts, because I never know when they are going to be used and it gives a "factory" look to the round. My uncle took an eight-point Whitetail with one of my rounds. I could beat that, if I really wanted to (haha). I actually couldn't because I don't hunt, I just target and combat shoot. I hope this helps. By the way, make sure your work area is well ventilated, trust me on this! It will cut down on the fire hazard and the brain cell depletion rate.
Link Posted: 5/23/2002 1:02:05 PM EDT
There is a product out there called " George and Ray's Primer Sealant". IIRC, it came in a little squeeze bottle.
Link Posted: 5/23/2002 1:14:05 PM EDT
I'd recommend you don't. Wolf ammo had a laquer seal. What happens is you fire a round and the laquer heats and disperses in your weapon creating hard laquer deposits. If is is a SKS it is no big deal. But you probably DON'T want laquer build up in your nicer guns.
Link Posted: 5/23/2002 1:42:00 PM EDT
Originally Posted By SteyrAUG: I'd recommend you don't. Wolf ammo had a laquer seal. What happens is you fire a round and the laquer heats and disperses in your weapon creating hard laquer deposits. If is is a SKS it is no big deal. But you probably DON'T want laquer build up in your nicer guns.
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I'm not sure about that. Awhile back, I pulled some surplus WWII 8mm Mauser ammo, and they have this black tar-like substance on the bullet and case mouth. I had to used my press to force the bullet down just a tad to break the seal before I could pull the bullet from the case with my kinetic hammer.
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