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3/20/2017 5:03:23 PM
Posted: 5/17/2002 10:43:36 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 5/17/2002 10:55:48 PM EDT by warlord]
"held off enemy troops for more than 30 minutes with a high-powered belt-fed machine gun." I bet he ran out of ammo, that's what the popular press says when a machine gun stop working. ============================================================ [url]http://www.cnn.com/2002/US/05/17/ret.seal.death/index.html[/url] CNN.com - Report details SEAL's last stand in Afghanistan - May 17, 2002 Report details SEAL's last stand in Afghanistan A classifed reports estimates that Petty Officer Neil Roberts held off enemy troops for more than 30 minutes. WASHINGTON (CNN) -- A Navy SEAL survived a fall from a U.S. helicopter March 4 and fought off enemy fighters for over 30 minutes before being killed at close range when his gun jammed, according to a classified report. Petty Officer Neil Roberts died in the opening hours of Operation Anaconda, a mission targeting Taliban and al Qaeda in eastern Afghanistan. A source familiar with the report said Roberts was thrown from the helicopter as it lurched violently after being hit by rocket-propelled grenades. In April, a classified internal Special Forces report said the MH-47 Chinook helicopter was trying to drop off troops, including Roberts, on a ridge when it came under fire. Roberts, the source said, had unhooked his safety harness because he was preparing to be the first off the aircraft. The tail gunner, who was tethered to the aircraft, was also thrown from the helicopter but was pulled back in. The classified report described Friday estimates Roberts, the only U.S. or allied soldier on the ground, held off enemy troops for more than 30 minutes with a high-powered belt-fed machine gun. Roberts was overrun and killed at close range -- a shooting some of his colleagues have described as an execution -- when his weapon jammed. He was dead by the time a six-man rescue team arrived on the scene, an official said. The team, believing the SEAL was still alive, came under heavy fire when it reached the site. One member of this rescue group, Air Force Technical Sgt. John Chapman, was killed by gunfire. Four more men died in a second rescue effort, including Senior Airman Jason Cunningham, who was on his first combat mission. The fighting did not end until U.S. Air Force gunships came in and attacked the al Qaeda mortar positions, and U.S. personnel had cleared the area within 12 hours after arriving. The military plans to give summaries of the report to relatives of those killed in the mission, followed by a congressional briefing. Defense Secretary Donald Rumsfeld may ultimately decide whether the full report ever becomes public. U.S. troops have since named the area where the March 4 fighting took place "Roberts Ridge," in memory of their fallen comrade. © 2002 Cable News Network LP, LLLP.
Link Posted: 5/17/2002 11:03:49 PM EDT
"held off enemy troops for more than 30 minutes with a high-powered belt-fed machine gun." OOH-RAH!!!
Link Posted: 5/17/2002 11:20:04 PM EDT
If I were that pilot, I'd have had a tough time leaving. Is this the fight where the air support didn't show up on time?
Link Posted: 5/17/2002 11:32:05 PM EDT
I'm sure the confusion was incredible - unexpected heavy resistance on the LZ, taking RPG hits and MG fire, a guy tossed off and having to be hauled in. They probably did not not realize Roberts was gone for a while after they aborted. Sh!t happens in combat, unfortunately. The sad part of it is they were surprised, with all the recon capabilities we have over there. That should never have happened.
Link Posted: 5/17/2002 11:37:30 PM EDT
Link Posted: 5/18/2002 1:30:55 AM EDT
"held off enemy troops for more than 30 minutes with a high-powered belt-fed machine gun."
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Usually the press reserves the term "high-powered" as an attempt to compare certain civilian weapons to their military counterparts. This time it [b]is[/b] a military weapon, thus no need to put "high-powered" in the definition. Did that make sense?
Link Posted: 5/18/2002 5:35:51 AM EDT
Originally Posted By SeaDweller:
"held off enemy troops for more than 30 minutes with a high-powered belt-fed machine gun."
View Quote
Usually the press reserves the term "high-powered" as an attempt to compare certain civilian weapons to their military counterparts. This time it [b]is[/b] a military weapon, thus no need to put "high-powered" in the definition. Did that make sense?
View Quote
Makes sense to me because I was thinking the same thing. Forgive me if I don't swallow everything CNN tries to feed me. I still don't know if Petty Officer Roberts ran out of ammo or if his gun jammed. Really, it's inmaterial. What does matter is he died on his feet. He didn't throw up is hands and surrendered like lesser men would and have done. He behaved like the quintessential American Hero. And THAT is what really matters. [marines]
Link Posted: 5/18/2002 5:59:21 AM EDT
Link Posted: 5/18/2002 6:30:13 AM EDT
Never have the words,
His courage, fearless devotion to duty and aggressive fighting spirit reflected great credit upon himself, and were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life in the service of his country.
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been more fitting.
Link Posted: 5/18/2002 7:23:37 AM EDT
Well said JonnieGTyler, Well said. I am sure the enemy paid a price for his sacrifice. Special Ops do not know the meaning of the word "quit"
Link Posted: 5/18/2002 7:24:55 AM EDT
[img]http://www.cnn.com/SPECIALS/2002/timeline.servicemen.deaths/images/story.neil.roberts.jpg[/img] -T.
Link Posted: 5/18/2002 10:20:13 AM EDT
He probably ran out of ammo. After 30 minutes blasting away with an M249/M240 you'd be out of ammo too.
Link Posted: 5/18/2002 10:24:41 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 5/18/2002 10:24:57 AM EDT by ColonelKlink]
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