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Posted: 5/8/2002 6:44:18 PM EDT
Looking for suggestions for some fresh reading material.
Link Posted: 5/8/2002 6:55:10 PM EDT
Well, [b]Aggie1[/b], have you ever read John Graves's writings about old Texas? Larry McMurtry calls Graves, Texas' greatest living writer. Start with [b]'Goodbye to a River'[/b] - it's about the writer taking a long leasurely canoe trip down the Brazos River after Possum Kingdom Dam's construction was certain to stop the flow of that river. As he paddles down the Brazos, he tells stories he heard in his childhood about events that occurred up and down the river and its streams. Then read [b]'Hardscrabble'[/b] - it's about the old man's attempts to make his farm into something worthwhile. Both books will teach you more of Texas history than you'd get in four years at TU![:D] After those two, you'll find the rest of his books on your own! Eric The(Literate)Hun[>]:)]
Link Posted: 5/8/2002 6:58:18 PM EDT
Thanks, ETH. I was beginning to wonder if anybody here knew what a book was.[;D]
Link Posted: 5/8/2002 7:03:27 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 5/8/2002 7:04:19 PM EDT by raven]
What are some of your favorite books? Subjects? Fiction/non? That'll help me recommend something.
Link Posted: 5/8/2002 7:04:53 PM EDT
Now do me a favor and guarantee me you will read at least ten pages into 'Goodbye to a River' before you put it down the first time! If you get past what, at first, appears to be the ramblings of an old man, you will find a helluva man. A former Marine who lost an eye at Saipan, and then took twenty years to come home after that war, to begin his life as a Texan, again. You'll never look at Indians, cowboys, coffee, cedar, mesquite, the weather, women, dogs, wildlife, and other subjects the same again. I'll look for a choice excerpt to whet your appetite! Eric The(TonkNation)Hun[>]:)]
Link Posted: 5/8/2002 7:05:52 PM EDT
Lately. Without Remorse The Hunt For Red October Into The Storm Patriot Games Reading Red Storm Rising right now, almost finished. The Bear and the Dragon is next. Can 'ya tell I'm a huge Clancy fan? -T.
Link Posted: 5/8/2002 7:06:24 PM EDT
Originally Posted By raven: What are some of your favorite books? Subjects? Fiction/non? That'll help me recommend something.
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You name it. I will read it. Except for romance novels anything is fair game. If you have read anything lately that you enjoyed let me know.
Link Posted: 5/8/2002 7:10:00 PM EDT
Here's a nice write-up on John Graves from an Abilene paper a couple of years ago: [url]http://www.texnews.com/1998/2000/features/message1126.html[/url] Eric The(StillLooking)Hun[>]:)]
Link Posted: 5/8/2002 7:13:28 PM EDT
Link Posted: 5/8/2002 7:14:47 PM EDT
Shakedown: Exposing the Real Jesse Jackson Kenneth R. Timmerman
Link Posted: 5/8/2002 7:15:01 PM EDT
A whole river is mountain country and hill country and flat country and swamp and delta country, is rock bottom and sand bottom and weed bottom and mud bottom, is blue, green, red, clear, brown, wide, narrow, fast, slow clean, and filthy water, is all the kinds of trees and grasses and all the breeds of animals and birds and man that pertain and have ever pertained to its changing shores... From [i][b]'Goodbye to a River'[/b][/i]
Link Posted: 5/8/2002 7:15:15 PM EDT
Well, there's a relief. I coulda sworn you were going to recommend the pathetic Left Behind books, Eric ;) Always a good read: Robert Heinlein's writings. The last fiction book I've read was Planet of the Apes (didn't know the author was French), and right now I'm reading Debt of Honor. Yep, I'm reading the Ryanverse books completely out of chronological order.
Link Posted: 5/8/2002 7:18:16 PM EDT
Try Lionel deMille books
Link Posted: 5/8/2002 7:18:43 PM EDT
Originally Posted By QCMGR: Shakedown: Exposing the Real Jesse Jackson Kenneth R. Timmerman
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That's a little too real for my taste. I think I'll skip the horror genre.
Link Posted: 5/8/2002 7:20:14 PM EDT
Originally Posted By EricTheHun: A whole river is mountain country and hill country and flat country and swamp and delta country, is rock bottom and sand bottom and weed bottom and mud bottom, is blue, green, red, clear, brown, wide, narrow, fast, slow clean, and filthy water, is all the kinds of trees and grasses and all the breeds of animals and birds and man that pertain and have ever pertained to its changing shores... From [i][b]'Goodbye to a River'[/b][/i]
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I grew up on a river and that gives about as good a description as any. Ahhh, now ya got me wishing I was a kid again.
Link Posted: 5/8/2002 7:21:38 PM EDT
Originally Posted By shooter69:
Originally Posted By QCMGR: Shakedown: Exposing the Real Jesse Jackson Kenneth R. Timmerman
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That's a little too real for my taste. I think I'll skip the horror genre.
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Try Civil War Firsts.
Link Posted: 5/8/2002 7:21:53 PM EDT
Sorry to disappoint you, [b]Kar98[/b], but there [u]are[/u] more things in heaven and earth than are dreamt of in your philosophy. I mean Ayn Rand is dead, Fred. And she believed that she would remain dead, forever! So even if she's wrong, she will be right! Now [u]that's[/u] covering all the bases! Eric The(IAin'tGonnaBeLeftBehind)Hun[>]:)]
Link Posted: 5/8/2002 7:22:45 PM EDT
There's another terrifix Texas writer named Joe Lansdale. He wrote a series of books about two east Texans named Hap and Leonard. The best one so far is "Mucho Mojo."
Link Posted: 5/8/2002 7:23:39 PM EDT
I just picked up Burroughs "The Place Of Dead Roads" starting it tonight.
Link Posted: 5/8/2002 7:24:47 PM EDT
Keep 'em coming guys. As for me I am off to work on finishing my current book. Thanks to all for the suggestions.
Link Posted: 5/8/2002 7:27:31 PM EDT
sure did, "The China Threat" and "Derailing Democracy" Check them both out!
Link Posted: 5/8/2002 7:30:12 PM EDT
The name Graves ETH mentioned reminded me of Robert Graves' books, I Claudius and the sequel Claudius the God. Historical fiction about the first imperial Roman dynasty, Narrated by the family feeb, Claudius. It's really, really good. Very interesting, lots of intrigue, funny, well written. [url]http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/067972477X/qid=1020914745/sr=8-3/ref=sr_8_67_3/102-7526444-9596907[/url] It's really good.
Link Posted: 5/8/2002 7:31:47 PM EDT
Originally Posted By EricTheHun: Sorry to disappoint you, [b]Kar98[/b], but there [u]are[/u] more things in heaven and earth than are dreamt of in your philosophy.
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What does this have to do with pitiful, badly written "holier than thou" books?
Link Posted: 5/8/2002 7:33:53 PM EDT
Bias by Bernard Goldberg. Excellent read about how the media twists the truth by an insider. It's a short read.
Link Posted: 5/8/2002 7:39:05 PM EDT
Black Hawk Down -- Excellent book. Blind Mans Bluff -- Good Submarine Espionage book. Hannibal -- Learned a lot about Roman military tactics and Hannibal. Trail of Tears -- Hard to read and sad. It is scary to consider what our gov. can do.
Link Posted: 5/8/2002 7:39:14 PM EDT
Try these Aggie1 Phu Nham (Barry Sadler) About Face and Brave Men (David Hackworth) Flight of the Intruder and The Intruders (Stephen Coonts) The Intruders is a better book than the Flight of the Intruder. And I believe that Jake flies over a river somewhere in Texas [;)]. Phu Nham is a fictional novel about a sniper in Nam. It is hard to find but well worth the trouble.
Link Posted: 5/8/2002 7:45:45 PM EDT
Link Posted: 5/8/2002 7:50:07 PM EDT
There is less talk of 'northers' these days. People sit softly at ten fifteen in the evening and watch while a bacon vendor points to highs and lows and fronts on a chart, and then they go to a wall to twirl their thermostats, and perhaps the windows rattle a little in the night, but that's about all...In the country, though, a front is a fact still. There it's a blue line along the horizon, and a waiting, sweaty hush, and a hit like a moving wall, and all of life scurrying for the southern lee of things. There it's a battening down, an opening of hydrant valves, a check of young and valuable stock, a walking across the swept lots with a flashlight, a leaning against the hard-shoving cold, a shuddering and creaking of old, tall, frame houses. There it's a norther, and there someone always, inevitably, rightly cracks the old one about there being nothing between West Texas and the Pole except a bob-wire fence. From [i][b]'Goodbye to a River'[/b][/i] Now that's about as good a description of a blue norther as you'll likely ever read! Eric The(ShallIGoOn?)Hun[>]:)]
Link Posted: 5/8/2002 7:52:29 PM EDT
'Citizen Soldiers'---Stephen E. Ambrose 'Band Of Brothers'---same 'Tai Pan'---James Clavell 'Shogun'---same I Just started 'August 1914'---Alexander Solzhenitsyn ARH
Link Posted: 5/8/2002 7:55:36 PM EDT
Originally Posted By ARH: I Just started 'August 1914'---Alexander Solzhenitsyn ARH
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I started that, but didn't finish. Fantastic writer, isn't he? Surprised me how readable he was. ETH, that was a nice excerpt.
Link Posted: 5/8/2002 7:57:24 PM EDT
I just finished "Unintended Consequences" by John Ross again. Alex
Link Posted: 5/8/2002 7:59:01 PM EDT
"Running to the Outhouse" by Willie Makit.
Link Posted: 5/8/2002 8:16:31 PM EDT
Fiction: 1632 by Eric Flint A Hymn Before Battle, Gust Front, and When the Devil Dances by John Ringo Island in the Sea of Time, Against the Tide of Years and On the Oceans of Eternity by SM Stirling Doc Sidhe and Sidhe Devil by Aaron Allston Nonfiction: The Demon Haunted World by Carl Sagan In the Beginning by John Gribbin The Lucifer Principle by Howard Bloom Biblical Prophecy: Failure or Fulfillment by Tim Callahan.
Link Posted: 5/8/2002 8:17:48 PM EDT
Some military history: "Six Silent Men," Volumes 1-3 By Reynel Martinez, Kenn Miller and Gary Linderer LRRPs in Vietnam "The Passing of the Night," By General Robbie Risner, USAF (Ret.) About his seven years in the Hanoi Hilton He lives in Austin, TX. "Ghost Soldiers," by Hampton Sides The story of the liberation of a Japanese POW camp on Luzon by US Army Rangers.
Link Posted: 5/8/2002 8:35:13 PM EDT
Originally Posted By raven:
Originally Posted By ARH: I Just started 'August 1914'---Alexander Solzhenitsyn ARH
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I started that, but didn't finish. Fantastic writer, isn't he? Surprised me how readable he was. I have heard good things about his work. Have you read any of his other books, and are they good? ARH
Link Posted: 5/8/2002 8:41:12 PM EDT
Chobits Vol 1 by CLAMP (graphic novel/manga/comic) and a bunch of misc XANTH novels i need to pic up unitented consquences
Link Posted: 5/8/2002 8:48:06 PM EDT
Originally Posted By ARH:
Originally Posted By raven:
Originally Posted By ARH: I Just started 'August 1914'---Alexander Solzhenitsyn ARH
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I started that, but didn't finish. Fantastic writer, isn't he? Surprised me how readable he was. I have heard good things about his work. Have you read any of his other books, and are they good?
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Yes! His masterwork "The Gulag Archipelago" should be required reading in High School (or for anyone interested in freedom for that matter).
Link Posted: 5/8/2002 8:53:02 PM EDT
Originally Posted By shooter69:
Originally Posted By ARH:
Originally Posted By raven:
Originally Posted By ARH: I Just started 'August 1914'---Alexander Solzhenitsyn ARH
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I started that, but didn't finish. Fantastic writer, isn't he? Surprised me how readable he was. I have heard good things about his work. Have you read any of his other books, and are they good?
View Quote
Yes! His masterwork "The Gulag Archipelago" should be required reading in High School (or for anyone interested in freedom for that matter).
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Thanks shooter69 I will get that next. ARH
Link Posted: 5/8/2002 8:53:02 PM EDT
Metzger's Dog and Storming Heaven. Ever wonder why all of a sudden after 1993 you had to show ID and all those weird useless pain in the ass security measures came into being in airports? It was because Clinton read a book called Storming Heaven by Dale Brown.
Link Posted: 5/8/2002 9:35:27 PM EDT
Originally Posted By shooter69:
Originally Posted By ARH:
Originally Posted By raven:
Originally Posted By ARH: I Just started 'August 1914'---Alexander Solzhenitsyn ARH
View Quote
I started that, but didn't finish. Fantastic writer, isn't he? Surprised me how readable he was. I have heard good things about his work. Have you read any of his other books, and are they good?
View Quote
Yes! His masterwork "The Gulag Archipelago" should be required reading in High School (or for anyone interested in freedom for that matter).
View Quote
"A Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich" is an excellent Solzhenitsyn book too.
Link Posted: 5/8/2002 9:47:04 PM EDT
Lost son. Bernard Kerik Autobiography.
Link Posted: 5/8/2002 9:48:40 PM EDT
Link Posted: 5/8/2002 10:05:23 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 5/8/2002 10:06:24 PM EDT by kicker9898]
Double Whammy, a story of murder on the professional bass fishing circuit. Also, I'm sure everyone has read these a number of times, but Stephen Hunter's books about Bob Lee Swagger and his Daddy. Point of Impact, Black Light, A Time to Hunt, Hot Springs, Pale Horse Coming. Also, Dirty White Boys, good book although not about the Swaggers directly. Robert B Parker novels about Spenser. Really liked "The Widening Gyre" and "A Catskill Eagle", Hugger Mugger wasn't bad either, but after a while, they are all the same book....lol. The last really good book I read was Vertical Run, not very deep, but a good quick read.
Link Posted: 5/8/2002 11:09:31 PM EDT
[u]The Lusty Lady[/u] by Erika Langley. [url]http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/3931141594[/url] (Regrettably, bamm.com doesn't carry it.)
Link Posted: 5/8/2002 11:10:11 PM EDT
"When Pride Still Mattered", about Vince Lombardi. "Frozen Hell", about the Korean War from the USMC perspective. It actually lists the point man on the lead platoon on the northern most invasion point. Amazing book. All of WEB Griffen's books about "The Corps" & the "Lt's", "Capt.'s" & his police series "Inspector's" etc. Anything by Louis Lamour. Anything by John D. McDonald, especially his Travis McGee series. Anything by G. Gordon Liddy, he has 2 novels & one bio. Tales from Margaritaville (sp?) by Jimmy Buffet. My .o2
Link Posted: 5/8/2002 11:12:09 PM EDT
On a technical note, John Plaster's Ultimate Sniper will keep your interest for an evening. Unintended Consequences is NOT to be missed. I second Stephen Hunter's Point of Impact. Claire Wolfe's little 101 Things to do Before the Revolution is a nifty little read in itself. It is also comforting to see others with the same taste in reading material.
Link Posted: 5/8/2002 11:44:41 PM EDT
The Three Musketeers [u]Excellent book[/u] Twenty Years After (haven't actually read this one yet, it happens between Musketeers and Iron Mask) The Man In The Iron Mask The Count Of Monte Cristo by Alexandre Dumas Ben-Hur by Lew Wallace a little slow and dry at times, but still very good Tom Sawyer Huck Finn A Conneticut Yankee In King Arthur's Court by Mark Twain Dracula by Bram Stoker Frankestein by Mary Shelly both are also excellent books Much Ado About Nothing The Two Gentlemen of Verona The Comedy of Errors All's Well That Ends Well Twelfth Night The Tempest Taming Of The Shrew King Lear Romeo And Juliet A Midsummer Night's Dream Hamlet MacBeth by Shakespeare Great Expectations by Charles Dickens Uncle Tom's Cabin by Harriet Beecher Stowe The Clansman by Thomas Dixon This was the basis for the 1915 DW Griffith silent film Birth of a Nation. It was published not long after the end of slavery, so you need to have a strong stomach to read it, but it is still "historically" interesting. (Don't advertise that you are reading this.) Oh yeah, almost forgot: Atlas Shrugged We The Living The Fountainhead Anthem That should keep you busy for a while.
Link Posted: 5/9/2002 1:09:13 AM EDT
"Rainbow Six" by Tom Clacny, yes its a book not just a video game. This book it packed full ordinace. One of my favorite lines from the book is when one off the characters is loading his mag to his compact .45 Beretta and makes a comment about the hollow points of the Hydra Shocks look big enough to mix a drink in.
Link Posted: 5/9/2002 2:03:24 AM EDT
"Vitals" and "Darwin's Radio" by Greg Bear "Psychohistorical Crisis" by Donald Kingsbury "Dune" by Frank Herbert (read this after the next 3) "Dune: House Atreides," "Dune: House Harkonnen," and "Dune: House Corrino" by Brian Herbert and Kevin J. Anderson. The entire "Wheel of Time" series by Robert Jordan (first book: "The Eye of the World.") "The Hobbit" and "Lord of the Rings" by J. R. R. Tolkien The "A Song of Ice and Fire" series by George R. R. Martin (first book: "A Game of Thrones")
Link Posted: 5/9/2002 2:27:37 AM EDT
my favorite is "fast food nation" the dark side of the all-american meal by eric schlosser here a link to a paragraph or 2 [url]www.nytimes.com/books/first/s/schlosser-fast.html[/url]
Link Posted: 5/9/2002 3:53:19 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 5/9/2002 3:56:12 AM EDT by rogerb]
some not mentioned: Up Country: by Nelson Demille ,about a Vietnam vet who returns to nam on a murder investigation, author wrote The Generals Daughter, this is the same character , Paul Brenner The Lions Game : Nelson Demille, Terrorist comes to America to extract revenge for Libya attack. Thunder In The Deep : by Joe Buff, Submarine story, He out-Clancys Clancy's lust for detail ... the action lives up to the jargon... gives terrific battle maneuvers.. Plus he is my neighbor !!!!
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