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Posted: 5/7/2002 11:49:38 PM EDT
About Firearms… I remember back in boy scouts when I first shot a real rifle. Everyone was lined up and just couldn’t get enough of it. Looking back on it makes me wonder if the instructor would have brought AR15s instead of the 22s what thinks would have been like… I know the AR15 doesn’t have much kick and we were shooting form the bench so it makes me think if it would have been a good idea to bring AR’s instead of 22s. So what do you guys think, I know the 22s would be cheaper but it would make that day extra special if they shot an AR [;)] - Sulaco
Link Posted: 5/8/2002 12:02:50 AM EDT
Well as far as bringing the AR into the Boy Scouts thats a no no by policy. Im a BSA instructor and do run the local camp range for the summer. We are restricted to single shot non semi auto rifles. Now there are no restrictions in the Venture crews though. We can hunt and shoot pistols and everything. As for haveing the AR for training purposes, I would say it would not be beneficial to training, fun factor yes. But for a first time shooting its much easier to monitor the weapons on the line with a bolt gun. plus the kids would not be able to focus if they saw the weapon in their hands. I get enough questions form kids who know only what they play in video games Mainly: Desert Eagle "50 Cal Sniper Rifle" I say stick with the basics
Link Posted: 5/8/2002 12:16:18 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 5/8/2002 12:47:41 AM EDT by Terrato]
I will be a shooting sports instructor at a local Scout camp this coming summer. The Rifle Shooting merit badge requirements are strict when it comes to metallic cartridge rifles - they must be .22lr, single shot, or have any kind of ammunition reservoir modified so that only one cartridge can be loaded at a time. The AR-15 might be suitable for older scouts, but for many boys, whose first experience with firearms is at summer camp, I think these rules are entirely appropriate. Marksmanship is the primary goal - we don't want younger, smaller scouts intimidated by shooting, and we don't want scouts "blasting away" with Rambo-type, action movie delusions in their heads. Cost, liability, and politics are also issues that have to be dealt with. There are people within the organization who are very concerned with appearing too "para-military" and the "evil black assault rifles" would be a hard sell. Remember that we are often dealing with boys that are children of "soccer moms." There are advantages to introducing these scouts to firearms in a somewhat "politically-neutral" manner. Certainly, once scouts have shown proficiency with .22 rifles, something like the AR-15 might be an appropriate step if they are interested in furthering their knowledge of the subject. I do not believe there are any specific provisions against the AR-15 or any other type of rifle for troop activities, just not for qualifying for the Rifle Shooting merit badge itself. (If I remember correctly, Philmont offers the opportunity to shoot CMP Garands.) It sounds like you appreciated the opportunity to learn firearm safety and marksmanship that Scouting gave you. If you think scouts would appreciate the opportunity to try something like the AR-15, you should get in contact with your local affiliates and offer your assistance. [:D]
Link Posted: 5/8/2002 2:56:47 AM EDT
I'm an NRA Certified Instructor. First let me say an AR15 is not a suitable rifle for basic instruction purposes. For safety and firearms handling instruction there are much better tools. Two attributes of an AR15 ARE desirable from a youth instruction viewpoint. First the collapsable stock allows the length of pull to be tailored to youth dimensions. Second the .22LR conversions that are available are more appropriate to instruction. Those attributes do not overcome the weight or the distraction issues. I like the simplest, lightest, most compact teaching tool I can get for my students. Safety considerations require a basic tool for a basic task.
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