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Posted: 9/14/2010 7:51:49 PM EDT
Did this one for a collector...not one I normally would paint for my collection,but a commission is a commisisson. It is a 120mm scale figure of Major Digby Tartham-Warter who commanded a Company of Brit Airborne at the battle of Arnhem. It led to some great research,turns out he was the classic Brit "Eccentric Gentleman" and favored a bowler and umbrella so "The lads could recognize me". Thought I would post a couple bad pics on here for all to see.





Link Posted: 9/14/2010 8:10:38 PM EDT
Reminds me of Mr. Stead from the Avengers. Well, if he was wearing BD, at any rate..

G
Link Posted: 9/14/2010 8:12:34 PM EDT
Looks good! I have never heard of him, so I googled him. Apparently he was quite the character. One article referred to his "anti-tank umbrella".
Link Posted: 9/14/2010 8:13:55 PM EDT
Wow! That is truely amazing. How many hours did it take?
Link Posted: 9/14/2010 8:15:38 PM EDT
Originally Posted By bmslade:
Looks good! I have never heard of him, so I googled him. Apparently he was quite the character. One article referred to his "anti-tank umbrella".


Yeah I read somewhere he supposedly used the umbrella to disable a German armored car,but I think that may be a stretch.
Link Posted: 9/14/2010 8:39:01 PM EDT
Originally Posted By sd0324:
Originally Posted By bmslade:
Looks good! I have never heard of him, so I googled him. Apparently he was quite the character. One article referred to his "anti-tank umbrella".


Yeah I read somewhere he supposedly used the umbrella to disable a German armored car,but I think that may be a stretch.



He did. He stuck it through a vision slit and disabled the driver.


Sheesh! The Brits over the years have sure produced a lot of real wartime characters over the years.

Legless pilots and God knows what.

Lord Lovat seemed like he wasn't playing with a full deck, either

Link Posted: 9/14/2010 8:39:48 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/14/2010 8:41:08 PM EDT by Credge]
:o

What brands of paint do you use? Also, how did you get those flesh tones?


ETA: Colors, techniques, etc. That's impressive stuff!
Link Posted: 9/14/2010 8:41:19 PM EDT
Originally Posted By 1SGBrett:
Wow! That is truely amazing. How many hours did it take?


Thank you....it took about 10 hours or so.
Link Posted: 9/14/2010 9:26:47 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Credge:
:o

What brands of paint do you use? Also, how did you get those flesh tones?


ETA: Colors, techniques, etc. That's impressive stuff!


The paint I like is Vallejo brand,it is acrylic and works really well for this stuff.
Link Posted: 9/14/2010 9:49:35 PM EDT
I bought "A Bridge Too Far" on DVD, at Wal-Mart, for $5 last night and watched it immediately after getting home. It's such an awesome movie, especially since it involves the 101st ABN DIV!
Link Posted: 9/15/2010 4:45:31 AM EDT
Bump for daylight viewing.
Link Posted: 9/15/2010 4:53:54 AM EDT
How about some pics of other things you've done? You really do have talent.

And the Brits really do have the lock on combat eccentricity. I believe some lunatic hit the beach on D-Day with a longbow. Got some too, as I recall.

Jane
Link Posted: 9/15/2010 5:07:31 AM EDT
Originally Posted By PlaneJane:
How about some pics of other things you've done? You really do have talent.

And the Brits really do have the lock on combat eccentricity. I believe some lunatic hit the beach on D-Day with a longbow. Got some too, as I recall.

Jane




Well, thank you Jane. Here are some others I have done.







Link Posted: 9/15/2010 5:10:04 AM EDT

whats the scale the full body guy?

i used to do a shit load of miniatures painting but it was for wargaming purposes.


Originally Posted By sd0324:
Originally Posted By PlaneJane:
How about some pics of other things you've done? You really do have talent.

And the Brits really do have the lock on combat eccentricity. I believe some lunatic hit the beach on D-Day with a longbow. Got some too, as I recall.

Jane




Well, thank you Jane. Here are some others I have done.

http://i20.photobucket.com/albums/b238/sd0324/usmc7.jpg


http://i20.photobucket.com/albums/b238/sd0324/Massoud3.jpg


http://i20.photobucket.com/albums/b238/sd0324/LRRP1.jpg


Link Posted: 9/15/2010 5:14:22 AM EDT
Originally Posted By sd0324:
Originally Posted By PlaneJane:
How about some pics of other things you've done? You really do have talent.

And the Brits really do have the lock on combat eccentricity. I believe some lunatic hit the beach on D-Day with a longbow. Got some too, as I recall.

Jane




Well, thank you Jane. Here are some others I have done.

http://i20.photobucket.com/albums/b238/sd0324/usmc7.jpg


http://i20.photobucket.com/albums/b238/sd0324/Massoud3.jpg


http://i20.photobucket.com/albums/b238/sd0324/LRRP1.jpg

Wow. That's cool. And I am SO envious. If I concentrate really, really hard, I can manage to do a half-assed job of rolling paint on a wall.

Jane

Link Posted: 9/15/2010 5:47:34 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/15/2010 5:48:40 AM EDT by 95thFoot]
England sure does produce some, er, ah, interesting war heroes. One, was "Bunny" Roger, an officer in the Rifle Brigade.

Neil Munro ("Bunny") Roger (June 9, 1911 in London - April 27, 1997 in London) was an English couturier, war hero and dandy.

Roger was born to Sir Alexander Roger and Helen Stuart Clark, both from Scotland. He read History at Balliol College, Oxford, though only for a year, then studied drawing at Ruskin.[1]

In 1937 Roger established his dress-makers, Neil Roger in Great Newport Street, London.

He served in Italy and North Africa in the Rifle Brigade in World War II. Roger was a war hero known for his courage under fire. A story that may be apocryphal has him replying to a sergeant's question regarding approaching Germans, "When in doubt, powder heavily."[2]

Following the war, he was invited to run the couture department at Fortnum & Mason. He invested in the House of Amies, and his stake was later acquired by Debenhams in 1973.

Roger was known for the lavish and outrageous parties that he held throughout his life. These events were often themed, as in the Diamond, Amethyst and Flame Balls held to celebrate the host's 50th, 60th, and 70th birthdays. [1][3]


References
^ a b Fisher, Clive (April 29, 1997), “Obituary: Bunny Roger”, The Independent, <http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_qn4158/is_19970429/ai_n14114501>. Retrieved on 2007-12-06
^ Trevelyan, Raleigh (May 14, 1997), “Obituary: Bunny Roger”, The Independent, <http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_qn4158/is_19970514/ai_n14106904>. Retrieved on 2007-12-06
^ Walsh, John (December 16, 1999), “My dear, we always partied like it was 1999”, The Independent, <http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_qn4158/is_19991216/ai_n14265404>. Retrieved on 2007-12-06

Bunny Roger was probably not the most fearsome soldier the allied army has ever had in its ranks.

Fighting for the British Rifle Brigade during the second world war, he went to battle wearing a chiffon scarf and brandishing a copy of Vogue. Once, when his sergeant asked him what should be done about the advancing enemy troops, Roger, who liked to wear rouge even with his khakis, replied, “When in doubt, powder heavily.” When he ran into an old friend in the hellish, bombed-out monastery of Monte Cassino in Italy he responded to his pal’s incredulous “What on earth are you doing here?” greeting with one word: “Shopping”.

As dandies go, Roger wasn’t a massive spender – he bought a mere 15 suits a year from his London tailor, Watson, Fargerstrom & Hughes, but, boy, was he ever particular. He liked exquisitely cut tartans, Edwardian-style jackets in pale shades of cerulean blue, lilac and shell pink, sharply tapered at the middle to show off his astonishing 29-inch waist. Roger, like all proper dandies, rivaled Oscar Wilde in the one-liner department. When a gobby cab driver yelled from his window, “Watch out, you’ve dropped your diamond necklace, love,” Roger replied, in a flash, “Diamonds with tweed? Never!”

http://www.guardian.co.uk/media/2006/jun/17/tvandradio.theguide





Can't find a pic of him in the army, but here's the most well-known pic of the guy:







Bowler, check; umbrella, check. Oh yeah- that's his car behind him....




Link Posted: 9/15/2010 11:49:52 AM EDT
Originally Posted By 95thFoot:
England sure does produce some, er, ah, interesting war heroes. One, was "Bunny" Roger, an officer in the Rifle Brigade.

Neil Munro ("Bunny") Roger (June 9, 1911 in London - April 27, 1997 in London) was an English couturier, war hero and dandy.

Roger was born to Sir Alexander Roger and Helen Stuart Clark, both from Scotland. He read History at Balliol College, Oxford, though only for a year, then studied drawing at Ruskin.[1]

In 1937 Roger established his dress-makers, Neil Roger in Great Newport Street, London.

He served in Italy and North Africa in the Rifle Brigade in World War II. Roger was a war hero known for his courage under fire. A story that may be apocryphal has him replying to a sergeant's question regarding approaching Germans, "When in doubt, powder heavily."[2]

Following the war, he was invited to run the couture department at Fortnum & Mason. He invested in the House of Amies, and his stake was later acquired by Debenhams in 1973.

Roger was known for the lavish and outrageous parties that he held throughout his life. These events were often themed, as in the Diamond, Amethyst and Flame Balls held to celebrate the host's 50th, 60th, and 70th birthdays. [1][3]


References
^ a b Fisher, Clive (April 29, 1997), “Obituary: Bunny Roger”, The Independent, <http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_qn4158/is_19970429/ai_n14114501>. Retrieved on 2007-12-06
^ Trevelyan, Raleigh (May 14, 1997), “Obituary: Bunny Roger”, The Independent, <http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_qn4158/is_19970514/ai_n14106904>. Retrieved on 2007-12-06
^ Walsh, John (December 16, 1999), “My dear, we always partied like it was 1999”, The Independent, <http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_qn4158/is_19991216/ai_n14265404>. Retrieved on 2007-12-06

Bunny Roger was probably not the most fearsome soldier the allied army has ever had in its ranks.

Fighting for the British Rifle Brigade during the second world war, he went to battle wearing a chiffon scarf and brandishing a copy of Vogue. Once, when his sergeant asked him what should be done about the advancing enemy troops, Roger, who liked to wear rouge even with his khakis, replied, “When in doubt, powder heavily.” When he ran into an old friend in the hellish, bombed-out monastery of Monte Cassino in Italy he responded to his pal’s incredulous “What on earth are you doing here?” greeting with one word: “Shopping”.

As dandies go, Roger wasn’t a massive spender – he bought a mere 15 suits a year from his London tailor, Watson, Fargerstrom & Hughes, but, boy, was he ever particular. He liked exquisitely cut tartans, Edwardian-style jackets in pale shades of cerulean blue, lilac and shell pink, sharply tapered at the middle to show off his astonishing 29-inch waist. Roger, like all proper dandies, rivaled Oscar Wilde in the one-liner department. When a gobby cab driver yelled from his window, “Watch out, you’ve dropped your diamond necklace, love,” Roger replied, in a flash, “Diamonds with tweed? Never!”

http://www.guardian.co.uk/media/2006/jun/17/tvandradio.theguide





Can't find a pic of him in the army, but here's the most well-known pic of the guy:



http://theselvedgeyard.files.wordpress.com/2010/01/bunny-roger.jpg



Bowler, check; umbrella, check. Oh yeah- that's his car behind him....






I really like the upholstered car.....I have never seen that before.
Link Posted: 9/15/2010 11:53:33 AM EDT
Originally Posted By grognard1:
Reminds me of Mr. Stead from the Avengers. Well, if he was wearing BD, at any rate..

G


Reminds me of Dum-Dum Dugan from Sgt Fury and the Howling Commandos
Link Posted: 9/15/2010 11:57:50 AM EDT
Beautiful work.
Link Posted: 9/15/2010 11:58:06 AM EDT
He's featured pretty prominently in "A Bridge Too Far" as Maj. Carlyle.

Link Posted: 9/15/2010 12:04:32 PM EDT
Link Posted: 9/15/2010 12:06:01 PM EDT
Link Posted: 9/15/2010 12:16:36 PM EDT
Originally Posted By NorCal_LEO:
Great work!

Do you work with a particular sculptor or paint whatever clients bring in?


On the commission stuff it is usually something a collector sends to me for paint.....and thank you for the compliment.
Link Posted: 9/15/2010 12:17:55 PM EDT
Originally Posted By sd0324:
Did this one for a collector...not one I normally would paint for my collection,but a commission is a commisisson. It is a 120mm scale figure of Major Digby Tartham-Warter who commanded a Company of Brit Airborne at the battle of Arnhem. It led to some great research,turns out he was the classic Brit "Eccentric Gentleman" and favored a bowler and umbrella so "The lads could recognize me". Thought I would post a couple bad pics on here for all to see.

http://i20.photobucket.com/albums/b238/sd0324/Digby12.jpg

http://i20.photobucket.com/albums/b238/sd0324/Digby5.jpg

http://i20.photobucket.com/albums/b238/sd0324/Digby3.jpg


Dennison Smock-check
Gaiters-check
'37 Pattern webbing-check
Correctly laced boots-check


good job
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