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Posted: 9/13/2010 1:13:04 PM EDT

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=55874


From Naval Meteorology and Oceanography Command Public Affairs

STENNIS SPACE CENTER, Miss. (NNS) –– The U.S. Navy, in conjunction with the Ocean Technology Foundation (OTF), the British Royal navy and the French navy, is leading participation in a search for the remains of the revolutionary warship Bonhomme Richard off the coast of Flamborough Head, England, the week of Sept. 10.

The search is expected to take approximately 10 days.

The Bonhomme Richard was a frigate given by France to John Paul Jones and the Continental Navy in support of the Revolutionary War. John Paul Jones renamed the ship Bonhomme Richard (Good Man Richard) in honor of his patron Benjamin Franklin, who used the pen name Richard Saunders to publish "Poor Richard's Almanac."

The oceanographic survey ship USNS Henson (T-AGS 63), operated by Military Sealift Command for the Naval Meteorology and Oceanography Command, will be the primary platform for the search. The survey crew is comprised of oceanographers from the Naval Oceanographic Office (NAVOCEANO) who planned and coordinated the U.S. Navy's participation in this search.

Representatives from the U.S. Naval Academy, Office of Naval Research (ONR) and the Naval History and Heritage Command will also be aboard Henson to assist in the search and identification of found artifacts.

The search planning process included use of a computer program developed by the faculty of the U.S. Naval Academy that integrates historical data, crew actions and last known position to establish where the ship is most likely to be found.

Bonhomme Richard, commanded by John Paul Jones, was lost off the coast of England in 1779 after a decisive battle with HMS Serapis, during which Jones shouted his famous words, "I have not yet begun to fight." Jones and his crew emerged from the battle victorious, seizing HMS Serapis as Bonhomme Richard sustained heavy damage during the battle and sank 36 hours later. The discovery of the Bonhomme Richard would be one of the most important archeological discoveries in U.S. Navy history.

"Over their years of active service, the Navy's oceanographic ships have sailed hundreds of thousands of nautical miles collecting critical oceanographic and hydrographic data that enable decision superiority across the spectrum of naval operations," said Rear Adm. Jonathan W. White, commander, Naval Meteorology and Oceanography Command (NMETOC). "I consider it an honor that our cutting edge naval ocean survey technology now will now be used to forge a connection with this historic ship and its commander and U.S. Navy hero, John Paul Jones."

Survey equipment will include Henson's towed side-scan sonar, unmanned underwater vehicles with side-scan and multibeam sonar, as well as ONR's unmanned underwater vehicles equipped with buried mine identification (BMI). The BMI system, consisting of an ultra-sensitive laser scalar gradiometer, a side-scan sonar and electro-optical imager, will employ technology used for identifying mines buried in the ocean bottom to find remnants of the Bonhomme Richard. A French navy mine-hunter with embarked divers will join the search to dive on any artifacts that require closer inspection.

This is the fifth expedition organized by the OTF in which the Navy has participated. This year's effort is the largest collaboration to date and includes the most substantial support by U.S. Navy assets.

NMETOC directs the Navy's meteorology and oceanography programs, maintains the Navy's atomic clock for precise time and tracks the positions of the stars for navigation. The command is comprised of approximately 3,000 officers, enlisted and civilian personnel stationed around the world. Naval oceanography enables the safety, speed and operational effectiveness of the fleet by illuminating the risks and opportunities for naval and joint forces posed by the present and future natural environment. NAVOCEANO is NMETOC's largest subordinate command.

For more news from Naval Meteorology and Oceanography Command, visit www.navy.mil/local/cnmoc/.

Link Posted: 9/13/2010 1:28:18 PM EDT
"Give me a fast ship, for I intend to go in harm's way."
-John Paul Jones


















...and the first motherfucker that asks why the bassist from Led Zeppelin had a frigate is going to walk the plank
Link Posted: 9/13/2010 1:40:58 PM EDT
That'd be quite a find...
Link Posted: 9/13/2010 1:42:57 PM EDT
Jones never gets his proper respect as a great captain and American hero.

He accomplished the equivalent of Patton driving home in Rommel's tanks.
Link Posted: 9/13/2010 1:44:57 PM EDT
Never rename a ship, it's bad luck.
Link Posted: 9/13/2010 1:45:16 PM EDT
Tag for excellence.

Link Posted: 9/13/2010 1:51:01 PM EDT

Originally Posted By akethan:
Never rename a ship, it's bad luck.

Never give a ship a mans name.
Link Posted: 9/13/2010 2:46:28 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Burban89:

Originally Posted By akethan:
Never rename a ship, it's bad luck.

Never give a ship a mans name.

It was french man's name so.....



Link Posted: 9/13/2010 3:06:22 PM EDT

Originally Posted By captainpooby:

Originally Posted By Burban89:

Originally Posted By akethan:
Never rename a ship, it's bad luck.

Never give a ship a mans name.

It was french man's name so.....



so... never a metrosexuals name?

Link Posted: 9/13/2010 3:14:51 PM EDT
That would a great find for history. Hope they find it.

Don't forget Captain John Paul ARFCOM's famous battle cry of "I have not yet begun to drink!"
Link Posted: 9/13/2010 5:29:06 PM EDT
I sailed on one of the blue water NAVO ships in 1990 (USNS H.H. Hess T-AGS38 / Oceanographic Unit 3). This quote kinda cracked me up:

"Over their years of active service, the Navy's oceanographic ships have sailed hundreds of thousands of nautical miles collecting critical oceanographic and hydrographic data that enable decision superiority across the spectrum of naval operations,"


We "surveyed" as soon as we left port until we got back. You do the math for a typical survop: 30 days * 24 hours * 20 knots. I participated in 8 survops, which put me at about 115,000 nautical miles mapped. I believe that NAVO has been mapping the ocean since the 1950s.
Link Posted: 9/13/2010 5:37:12 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Rogue-Sasquatch:
Jones never gets his proper respect as a great captain and American hero.

Aside from the fact that he's entombed in a sarcophagus under the chapel of the US Naval Academy, with a US Navy Honor Guard... that is visited hundreds of times a day.
Link Posted: 9/13/2010 5:57:49 PM EDT
So what did Jones do with the Serapis after he captured it?
Link Posted: 9/13/2010 6:18:37 PM EDT

<snip>

...and the first motherfucker that asks why the bassist from Led Zeppelin had a frigate is going to walk the plank



So, does anyone know if John Paul Jones was named after John Paul Jones?
Link Posted: 9/13/2010 6:22:32 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Ahiodsohi:
So what did Jones do with the Serapis after he captured it?

The Serapis was taken by the French and used as a privateer after Jones won the battle
Link Posted: 9/13/2010 6:29:52 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Sharpshooter:

Originally Posted By Ahiodsohi:
So what did Jones do with the Serapis after he captured it?

The Serapis was taken by the French and used as a privateer after Jones won the battle

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/HMS_Serapis_(1779)

The French commissioned the Serapis to a privateer named Roche who planned to use the ship against the British in the Indian Ocean. However, in July 1781 the ship was lost off the coast of Madagascar when a sailor accidentally dropped a lantern into a tub of brandy. The crew fought the fire for two and one half hours, but the flames eventually burned through the spirit locker walls and reached a powder magazine. The resulting explosion blew the stern off the ship and the vessel sank.

In November 1999 American nautical archeologists Richard Sweet and Michael Tuttle located the remains of the Serapis.


Link Posted: 9/13/2010 6:33:35 PM EDT
If I recall..I read the Bonhome Richard was in poor shape before the battle...burning and sinking after the battle....and likely a pile of fittings and cannon now.

I also thought it was found some time back?....but maybe they were just looking for it of the English coast.....John Paul sure got a bunch of English panties in a bunch by his coast raiding...and commerce raiding off the British coast.

Books on his exploits made great reading as a kid!!
Link Posted: 9/13/2010 6:34:30 PM EDT
All they need to do is call Clive Cussler...
Link Posted: 9/13/2010 6:37:51 PM EDT
The JPJ right?



USS JOHN PAUL JONES DDG-53



Also featured in:

Link Posted: 9/13/2010 6:41:52 PM EDT
I'm in.
Link Posted: 9/13/2010 6:42:31 PM EDT

Originally Posted By von_landstuhl:

Originally Posted By Sharpshooter:

Originally Posted By Ahiodsohi:
So what did Jones do with the Serapis after he captured it?

The Serapis was taken by the French and used as a privateer after Jones won the battle

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/HMS_Serapis_(1779)

The French commissioned the Serapis to a privateer named Roche who planned to use the ship against the British in the Indian Ocean. However, in July 1781 the ship was lost off the coast of Madagascar when a sailor accidentally dropped a lantern into a tub of brandy. The crew fought the fire for two and one half hours, but the flames eventually burned through the spirit locker walls and reached a powder magazine. The resulting explosion blew the stern off the ship and the vessel sank.

In November 1999 American nautical archeologists Richard Sweet and Michael Tuttle located the remains of the Serapis.



It would appear the infamous "Seaman Timmy" was around back then too
Link Posted: 9/13/2010 6:46:19 PM EDT
Why did the bassist for Led Ze...


Originally Posted By Ragin_Cajun:


...and the first motherfucker that asks why the bassist from Led Zeppelin had a frigate is going to walk the plank


FFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFUUUUUUUU­UUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUU
Link Posted: 9/13/2010 7:01:18 PM EDT
Didn`t Clive Cussler,the novelist, search for the Bon Homme Richard? After all he found the CSS Hunley.
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