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Posted: 9/9/2010 3:10:26 PM EDT
I have a set of Henkel Knives. Now my impression of knives is that the more carbon is in them, the harder they are but the easier they rust.

Well my knives rust if I leave them wet on the counter, but I can pretty easily bend the blade with my hand. Is this normal?

I have the Forged Premio.

http://www.zwillingonline.com/16929000.html
Link Posted: 9/9/2010 3:12:07 PM EDT
Do they hold an edge well?

Toughness is a very sought-after attribute in steel.
Link Posted: 9/9/2010 3:22:01 PM EDT
that's an inexpensive set of knives from Henkle. Move up in price
Link Posted: 9/9/2010 7:41:44 PM EDT
Originally Posted By zuuk:
that's an inexpensive set of knives from Henkle. Move up in price


I think we got them for over $200.

I think I might return them to Bed Bath and Beyond for store credit and get the Classic block set. Those are GREAT prices for Henkel right now.
Link Posted: 9/9/2010 7:44:14 PM EDT
Are they the ones marked "Made in China" or are they the actual European made ones?
Link Posted: 9/9/2010 7:54:27 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/9/2010 7:56:40 PM EDT by CWO]
Originally Posted By Boom_Stick:
Are they the ones marked "Made in China" or are they the actual European made ones?


The OP's link is to the lower-end "J.A" Henckels brand (not the better German "Zwilling" line). The J.A. Henckels line is usually made in either China or Taiwan.
Link Posted: 9/9/2010 8:01:08 PM EDT
Originally Posted By JonnyVain:
Originally Posted By zuuk:
that's an inexpensive set of knives from Henkle. Move up in price


I think we got them for over $200.

I think I might return them to Bed Bath and Beyond for store credit and get the Classic block set. Those are GREAT prices for Henkel right now.


$200 for a set? That's a pretty cheap knife. There is nothing wrong with that, but they are not going to hold an edge or be rust resistant like a higher end knife.
Link Posted: 9/9/2010 8:04:36 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/9/2010 8:05:45 PM EDT by OKZJ]

Originally Posted By JonnyVain:
I have a set of Henkel Knives. Now my impression of knives is that the more carbon is in them, the harder they are but the easier they rust.

Well my knives rust if I leave them wet on the counter, but I can pretty easily bend the blade with my hand. Is this normal?

I have the Forged Premio.

http://www.zwillingonline.com/16929000.html

Bending has absolutely zero to do with the quality of the steel and everything to do with its thickness. I presume these are either very thin or very long.

Annealed and hardened steel both bend equally. ETA: Bend equally as in they take the same force to bend the same distance. The difference it, annealed steel can bend all the way around itself and not break, but it takes a set and doesn't spring back. Overly hardened steel will snap after a small bend. A properly made knife will be hard enough to hold an excellent edge while still being soft enough to bend without breaking, but not so soft as to take a set and not spring back to its original shape. Some makers do this by softening the spine but leaving the edge hard. Very unlikely your kitchen knives have this treatment.

Either way, if they hold a good edge, they're good to go. Flexible knives are useful. If they flex too much for your liking, get a thicker knife.

Oh, BTW, I'm a knifemaker.
Link Posted: 9/9/2010 8:07:17 PM EDT
Global or Shun, keep oiled with food grade mineral spirits... Don't put in the dishwasher.

Link Posted: 9/9/2010 8:09:39 PM EDT
Suggestion: Use the sharp edge to cut with, not the side. It should stop bending so much.
Link Posted: 9/9/2010 8:39:15 PM EDT
unless you are talking about a flexible boning knife or a fillet knife, they really shouldn't bend easily. the knives in the link are also stainless steel so they shouldn't be rusting either. and definitely not in any way close to the way a true high carbon blade would.
Link Posted: 9/9/2010 8:49:09 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/9/2010 8:49:36 PM EDT by DanTSX]
Mine do not bend. Sharp after 2 years of use. No rust, but are hand-washed, no oil. Make steak night fun. They are from eurolandia. They probably sold their name to the chinese. All good things go to shit because of the chinese.
Link Posted: 9/10/2010 5:23:38 AM EDT
Originally Posted By DanTSX:
Mine do not bend. Sharp after 2 years of use. No rust, but are hand-washed, no oil. Make steak night fun. They are from eurolandia. They probably sold their name to the chinese. All good things go to shit because of the chinese.


What does China have to do with consumers demanding goods with the greater emphasis on low, low cost instead of quality? Henckels is simply responding to consumer demand - and sent manufacturing of their low cost line offshore where it could be made cheaply. China didn't do that - Henckels did. And consumers buy these low cost knives - reinforcing the demand.

The high quality, German-made Henckels line still exists and is available for sale. Just be prepared to pay $100-300 per knife for the quality of materials and workmanship that you receive.
Link Posted: 9/10/2010 5:38:04 AM EDT

Originally Posted By JonnyVain:
Originally Posted By zuuk:
that's an inexpensive set of knives from Henkle. Move up in price


I think we got them for over $200.

I think I might return them to Bed Bath and Beyond for store credit and get the Classic block set. Those are GREAT prices for Henkel right now.


Lulz. You don't buy Henkels in sets you buy them individualy. I was a cook once. You can easily spend a grand on a professional set of knives. IMHO buy a good 12 or 14 inch French knife. It'll set you back probably a good 120$-140$ but most people only use that knife for chopping and cuttting. GREAT knives. I've bought my dad quite a few of them over the years. I think he's had his main knife for 10 years now and it's still sharp as shit and holds an edge VERY well.

Oh, the more expensive ones pretty much have a lifetime warranty on them too. The less scrupulous cooks would walk out into the parking lot and drop them on their tips to break them off so they could get a new one.

One more thing, never run a good set of knives through a dishwasher ALWAYS handwash them.
Link Posted: 9/10/2010 5:42:40 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/10/2010 5:43:31 AM EDT by DanTSX]

Originally Posted By CWO:
Originally Posted By DanTSX:
Mine do not bend. Sharp after 2 years of use. No rust, but are hand-washed, no oil. Make steak night fun. They are from eurolandia. They probably sold their name to the chinese. All good things go to shit because of the chinese.


What does China have to do with consumers demanding goods with the greater emphasis on low, low cost instead of quality? Henckels is simply responding to consumer demand - and sent manufacturing of their low cost line offshore where it could be made cheaply. China didn't do that - Henckels did. And consumers buy these low cost knives - reinforcing the demand.

The high quality, German-made Henckels line still exists and is available for sale. Just be prepared to pay $100-300 per knife for the quality of materials and workmanship that you receive.

There are plenty of chinese made shitty knives.

Consumer demand for high-quality knives exists. Henckels and others go to china and sell the product for the same price in order to line the pockets of shareholders and stakeholders.

The consumers lose. Trust me, they, and other companies, are not doing you favors by locating to china. You are not the one saving money. In many cases, you pay more for the LACK of quality.
Link Posted: 9/10/2010 5:46:02 AM EDT

Originally Posted By DanTSX:

Originally Posted By CWO:
Originally Posted By DanTSX:
Mine do not bend. Sharp after 2 years of use. No rust, but are hand-washed, no oil. Make steak night fun. They are from eurolandia. They probably sold their name to the chinese. All good things go to shit because of the chinese.


What does China have to do with consumers demanding goods with the greater emphasis on low, low cost instead of quality? Henckels is simply responding to consumer demand - and sent manufacturing of their low cost line offshore where it could be made cheaply. China didn't do that - Henckels did. And consumers buy these low cost knives - reinforcing the demand.

The high quality, German-made Henckels line still exists and is available for sale. Just be prepared to pay $100-300 per knife for the quality of materials and workmanship that you receive.

There are plenty of chinese made shitty knives.

Consumer demand for high-quality knives exists. Henckels and others go to china and sell the product for the same price in order to line the pockets of shareholders and stakeholders.

The consumers lose. Trust me, they, and other companies, are not doing you favors by locating to china. You are not the one saving money. In many cases, you pay more for the LACK of quality.


I've gotta say, you really do get what you pay for with knives. Sure, you didn't spend a whole lot up front but if you buy the expensive ones just one at a time they will litterally outlast you rather than buying 3 or 4 cheap sets throughout your life. Buy once, cry once.
Link Posted: 9/10/2010 5:55:04 AM EDT
I have a cheap set of Chinese made Henkels that I got at Sears a few years back.

They do not hold an edge very well but they sharpen quite easily and they are a decent set of knives.

Eventually I plan to start replacing each knife one at a time with a real Henkel but for now they do what I need them to do.

Since they were cheap we put them in the dishwasher and they do get small rust spots on them even though they are stainless.

All in all a decent set but they ARE NOT real Henkels.
Link Posted: 9/10/2010 6:10:46 AM EDT
I use the 5 stars. Other than the boning knife and the 8" carving knife (long and thin), they don't bend.

Also, my wife has left them on the counter in a pool of water overnight, and they've never had a spot of rust on them.

Get better knives.
Link Posted: 9/10/2010 6:21:52 AM EDT
Originally Posted By DanTSX:

Originally Posted By CWO:
Originally Posted By DanTSX:
Mine do not bend. Sharp after 2 years of use. No rust, but are hand-washed, no oil. Make steak night fun. They are from eurolandia. They probably sold their name to the chinese. All good things go to shit because of the chinese.


What does China have to do with consumers demanding goods with the greater emphasis on low, low cost instead of quality? Henckels is simply responding to consumer demand - and sent manufacturing of their low cost line offshore where it could be made cheaply. China didn't do that - Henckels did. And consumers buy these low cost knives - reinforcing the demand.

The high quality, German-made Henckels line still exists and is available for sale. Just be prepared to pay $100-300 per knife for the quality of materials and workmanship that you receive.

There are plenty of chinese made shitty knives.

Consumer demand for high-quality knives exists. Henckels and others go to china and sell the product for the same price in order to line the pockets of shareholders and stakeholders.

The consumers lose. Trust me, they, and other companies, are not doing you favors by locating to china. You are not the one saving money. In many cases, you pay more for the LACK of quality.


So consumers shouldn't buy the cheap line. Customer demand leads manufacturers and retailers. If customers won't buy a product or a line - it will not continue to be made or sold. Chances are - the manufacturer's market research will reveal this and it will never be produced in the first place.

WalMart sell cheap crap because there is a large base of consumers that want that. For them - price is priority one. That is why flatscreen TV manufacturers make models just for WalMart that have fewer features and are cheaper. Funny thing is - the price-conscious customers don't usually pick up on the difference and think they are getting a killer deal over the price for the better model at Best Buy.

China didn't invent this. American consumers did.
Link Posted: 9/10/2010 6:28:10 AM EDT
I've had a set of 4 star Henckels for 16+ years now and I've never had problems with them. I use them every day and have never had them bend or rust. I probably use a steel every other time, and the only problem I've had is some of the knives have stained, even though they have the "no stain" printed on them. They hold an edge well and are well balanced.
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