Warning

 

Close

Confirm Action

Are you sure you wish to do this?

Confirm Cancel
Member Login
Posted: 9/8/2010 6:59:17 AM EDT
DIY or hire a plumber? I've replaced bathroom sink faucets before but not kitchen sink. Is it less/more difficult?
Link Posted: 9/8/2010 7:00:25 AM EDT
Still a DIY job. Just check and make sure you can get at the shank nut on the old faucet w/o a special wrench before starting.
Link Posted: 9/8/2010 7:01:32 AM EDT
Link Posted: 9/8/2010 7:02:04 AM EDT
The hard part is always removing the old faucet. Inspect it carefully and be sure you understand how to take it out and have all the tools you are likely to need, or you will be in a world of frustration and pain.
Link Posted: 9/8/2010 7:04:09 AM EDT
Originally Posted By thebeekeeper1:
DIY with a little knowledge, but remember one thing about tearing into old plumbing––one thing leads to another, to another, to another, to another . . .


This, plus remember that a Sawzall may seem like a good tool at the time but usually complicates things down the road.
Link Posted: 9/8/2010 7:09:03 AM EDT
Replaced mine last week. Couldn't have been easier, maybe 30 minutes.
Link Posted: 9/8/2010 7:09:42 AM EDT

Originally Posted By moparman71:
Still a DIY job. Just check and make sure you can get at the shank nut on the old faucet w/o a special wrench before starting.

Tools:

http://www.doityourself.com/stry/typesofplumbwrench

Hope that helps OP. It's a simple job, just buy the right tools, they're cheap.

Link Posted: 9/8/2010 7:14:53 AM EDT
Link Posted: 9/8/2010 7:23:15 AM EDT
Pretty easy, taking out the old is the hardest part.
Link Posted: 9/8/2010 7:33:46 AM EDT
simple job, 20 -30 mins, (assuming you have the right tools)
Link Posted: 9/8/2010 7:43:11 AM EDT
Get a Basin wrench. they are cheap as shit and will save you alot of swearing down the road.

http://www.homedepot.com/h_d1/N-5yc1vZ1xlb/R-100006605/h_d2/ProductDisplay?langId=-1&storeId=10051&catalogId=10053

Link Posted: 9/8/2010 7:54:20 AM EDT
Its pretty easy. Just look at what's there and make sure you have the right tools. You may need a offset basin wrench. They look like this:



A lot of the newer faucets don't require one and you can get by without one. Its a pain in the ass if you need one and don't have it though. You'll save yourself more than enough to pay for the tools. I'd also suggest using flexible braided lines from the valve to the faucet.
Link Posted: 9/8/2010 7:58:42 AM EDT
Faucet is a piece of cake if you can get the old one off the old sink.

If not, replacing the whole sink ain't too hard either. Though if the drain pipe is copper and soldered, you will need to know how to properly sweat a connection.
Link Posted: 9/8/2010 8:35:49 AM EDT


+1

That was invaluable when doing mine.
Link Posted: 9/8/2010 8:52:56 AM EDT
Originally Posted By thebeekeeper1:
DIY with a little knowledge, but remember one thing about tearing into old plumbing––one thing leads to another, to another, to another, to another . . .



An analogy would be an erect penis chasing a wet vagina.

It's just one fucking thing after another.

Link Posted: 9/10/2010 7:04:48 AM EDT

Originally Posted By piccolo:
Originally Posted By thebeekeeper1:
DIY with a little knowledge, but remember one thing about tearing into old plumbing––one thing leads to another, to another, to another, to another . . .



An analogy would be an erect penis chasing a wet vagina.

It's just one fucking thing after another.


Much truth here. I finished a remodel on a 60 year old house about the middle of July. Replaced a tub, dishwasher and kitchen faucet. What a nightmare. Who ever put the dishwasher in originally didn't see fit to put a shut off valve in the supply line. Odd size copper in the bathroom, mixtures of hard and soft copper, hard lines all the way to the kitchen faucet, etc., etc., etc. The local plumbing supply place became my home away from home. I HATE working on old houses.

The house I live in was built, for the most part, by the local high school's building trades class. When I replaced the kitchen sink and faucet I found whoever plumped the faucet had used a weird mixture of hard copper and plastic parts. I also discovered there is no shutoff for the main supply in the house. You have to shut it off at the street. We also replaced the dishwasher. I was sitting in the family room while the guy who delivered and installed it was working. I heard him that's different. Once again strange plumbing, hard copper all the way to the dishwasher. It was pretty but what the fuck?

OP, how did things go?

Top Top