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Posted: 9/7/2010 8:05:53 AM EDT
If anybody would know besides the tire manufacturers it's got to be here.

If you look at the tread on a car with directional tread, you notice the front tires and rear tires have tread in the same direction. A pattern that looks like it would channel water away from the center of the tire.

But on motorcycle tires, the directional tread on the front tire looks "backwards." Like it would channel water toward the center of the tire. Why is that?


Link Posted: 9/7/2010 8:09:03 AM EDT
I disagree with your characterization of a motorcycle tread pattern. Can you post a pic showing what you're saying?
Link Posted: 9/7/2010 8:09:23 AM EDT
Because the center of the tire isn't in contact with the pavement when you need traction most on a Motorcycle
Link Posted: 9/7/2010 8:11:50 AM EDT
Originally Posted By Katana16j:
Because the center of the tire isn't in contact with the pavement when you need traction most on a Motorcycle


Why does the rear tire have the forward directional tread then?

Link Posted: 9/7/2010 8:12:24 AM EDT
Same reason it's reversed on the front wheels (non driven) on a motor grader. It aids steering ability.
Link Posted: 9/7/2010 8:13:34 AM EDT
Originally Posted By VBC:
Originally Posted By Katana16j:
Because the center of the tire isn't in contact with the pavement when you need traction most on a Motorcycle


Why does the rear tire have the forward directional tread then?



Because it's driven. It aids in traction in loose/wet ground.

Link Posted: 9/7/2010 8:14:10 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/7/2010 8:16:38 AM EDT by VBC]
Originally Posted By Emoto:
I disagree with your characterization of a motorcycle tread pattern. Can you post a pic showing what you're saying?


Too lazy. Look at any sport bike with Michelin Pilot powers or any other directional z-rated tire and you can see what I mean. Some people even install the front backwards because they only looked at the pattern (and match it with the rear tire). But you have to look at the little arrow marker on the sidewall to see which way she's supposed to spin.

I lever on my own tires and always wondered this.
Link Posted: 9/7/2010 8:15:01 AM EDT
Originally Posted By Wirebrush:
Originally Posted By VBC:
Originally Posted By Katana16j:
Because the center of the tire isn't in contact with the pavement when you need traction most on a Motorcycle


Why does the rear tire have the forward directional tread then?



Because it's driven. It aids in traction in loose/wet ground.



But a RWD drive car has matching front and rear tire directional tread.
Link Posted: 9/7/2010 8:15:20 AM EDT
Originally Posted By Wirebrush:
Originally Posted By VBC:
Originally Posted By Katana16j:
Because the center of the tire isn't in contact with the pavement when you need traction most on a Motorcycle


Why does the rear tire have the forward directional tread then?



Because it's driven. It aids in traction in loose/wet ground.



But a RWD drive car has matching front and rear tire directional tread.
Link Posted: 9/7/2010 8:15:46 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/7/2010 8:17:05 AM EDT by WhyTanFox]
This has come up on the SabMag mailing list a few times.

On common answer is that it reduces or corrects hydroplaning if you lock the front wheel.

Another common answer is the observation that the same model tire made for the European market has the "arrows" in the opposite direction, and that the tread pattern may be chosen more by local aesthetics than any overbearing technical reason.



Link Posted: 9/7/2010 8:17:54 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/7/2010 8:25:30 AM EDT by www-glock19-com]


yep I noticed this with the last set of tires i put on
thought it was wrong til,I looked at the rotation arrows and now notice it on other bikes

my theory is the tread faces the direction of most force
with the rear it is acceleration and the front it is breaking
they meet max force in different directions therefore the tread run opposite

if ya look even the low performance motorcycle tires are the same way on most cruisers


Link Posted: 9/7/2010 8:24:38 AM EDT

Originally Posted By WhyTanFox:
This has come up on the SabMag mailing list a few times.

On common answer is that it reduces or corrects hydroplaning if you lock the front wheel.

Another common answer is the observation that the same model tire made for the European market has the "arrows" in the opposite direction, and that the tread pattern may be chosen more by local aesthetics than any overbearing technical reason.



We're going to need some data to support that one. Michelin, Dunlop, Avon and Continental tires are the same in the US and in other markets. I've never heard of a "reversed arrow" on a tire.

The sipes on a motorcycle radial front tire are designed to move the water into a narrow channel, thus eliminating spray. Look at this page. These are the tires I have on my BMW. If you notice the image at the top of the page, you will see that the front tire produces a very small and shallow rooster-tail, whereas the rear tire sprays the water higher and farther.

Link Posted: 9/7/2010 8:29:02 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/7/2010 8:29:21 AM EDT by VBC]
Originally Posted By DzlBenz:
The sipes on a motorcycle radial front tire are designed to move the water into a narrow channel, thus eliminating spray. Look at this page. These are the tires I have on my BMW. If you notice the image at the top of the page, you will see that the front tire produces a very small and shallow rooster-tail, whereas the rear tire sprays the water higher and farther.



Makes sense.
Link Posted: 9/7/2010 8:32:36 AM EDT
Originally Posted By VBC:
Originally Posted By Katana16j:
Because the center of the tire isn't in contact with the pavement when you need traction most on a Motorcycle


Why does the rear tire have the forward directional tread then?



I would imagine for steering. And more importantly, considering 70% or so of your braking force is exerted by the front brake..
Link Posted: 9/7/2010 10:25:32 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Gravity_Tester:
Originally Posted By VBC:
Originally Posted By Katana16j:
Because the center of the tire isn't in contact with the pavement when you need traction most on a Motorcycle


Why does the rear tire have the forward directional tread then?



I would imagine for steering. And more importantly, considering 70% or so of your braking force is exerted by the front brake..
If you do it right, 100% of your braking work is done by the front brake.

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