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Posted: 9/6/2010 2:27:47 PM EDT
This outlet is located in the garage, and every time it rains the GFCI trips. I replaced the outlet a week ago and all was well until it rained today. It resets with no problems. What should I do to remedy this issue?
Link Posted: 9/6/2010 2:32:01 PM EDT
Originally Posted By DPeacher:
This outlet is located in the garage, and every time it rains the GFCI trips. I replaced the outlet a week ago and all was well until it rained today. It resets with no problems. What should I do to remedy this issue?


Is this the end of the circuit? If not, you are getting water in at another place.
Link Posted: 9/6/2010 2:33:38 PM EDT
I'm not an electrictian, but I did stay at the Holiday Inn last night.
That recepticle is probably wired to an outlet outside that's getting wet during the rain. Find the outlet outside that's causing the problem and put a better cover on it. There are covers that you can plug a cord into and shut over it. Usually they do a good job of protecting the outlet.
Link Posted: 9/6/2010 2:35:53 PM EDT
Link Posted: 9/6/2010 2:35:55 PM EDT
Let me clarify,, many times, one GFI has several regular receptacles past it on the same circuit. This one GFI will in turn make the other regular looking receptacles GFI also.. Look for your problem on an exterior wall receptacle.
Link Posted: 9/6/2010 2:36:14 PM EDT
If the circuit that feeds the outlet is fed from another building by wires in an underground conduit or a piece of direct burial cable; ground water may be entering into the cable or conduit causing a ground fault condition when it rains.
Link Posted: 9/6/2010 2:41:48 PM EDT

Originally Posted By timmr:
I'm not an electrictian, but I did stay at the Holiday Inn last night.
That recepticle is probably wired to an outlet outside that's getting wet during the rain. Find the outlet outside that's causing the problem and put a better cover on it. There are covers that you can plug a cord into and shut over it. Usually they do a good job of protecting the outlet.

This...

Outdoor receptacles are required to be GFCI protected..my outdoor receptacles get their power from the garage GFCI outlet. I bet yours does too.
Link Posted: 9/6/2010 2:46:52 PM EDT
Originally Posted By America-first:
If the circuit that feeds the outlet is fed from another building by wires in an underground conduit or a piece of direct burial cable; ground water may be entering into the cable or conduit causing a ground fault condition when it rains.


I should have stated this is an attached garage, but I do appreciate the info because I may run into this issue under those circumstances at some point in the future.

For those who have mentioned the outdoor outlets, I have two of them, so I will probably go ahead and replace the covers since they have been out in the weather for 10 years.

Thanks to everyone who has replied!
Link Posted: 9/6/2010 7:28:39 PM EDT
I have a GFCI circuit breaker protecting a number of outlets in my basement, and it often trips due to humidity only, and not from actual water entering one of the protected outlets (AFAIK - I have not seen any liquid water or condensation that would account for it, but maybe I have missed something).


Link Posted: 9/6/2010 8:18:42 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/6/2010 8:19:08 PM EDT by Skibane]
Originally Posted By America-first:
If the circuit that feeds the outlet is fed from another building by wires in an underground conduit or a piece of direct burial cable; ground water may be entering into the cable or conduit causing a ground fault condition when it rains.


Back in the pre-GFCI days, we had a several square foot section of our back yard that would "tickle" any time you stepped on it in bare feet. The buried cable fed 120 VAC to a detached garage.

I'm REALLY glad GFCIs were invented...
Link Posted: 9/7/2010 4:44:19 AM EDT
Couple of other possibiltes : 1st (cover) ,2nd (neutral/ ground for the circuit which the GFI is fed from has oxidation in the panel) . 3 rd ( GFI bad)
Link Posted: 9/7/2010 5:42:15 AM EDT
I replaced the outside outlet covers last night. We are getting some rain here now, and the GFCI circuit in question is holding for now.

Thanks everyone!
Link Posted: 9/7/2010 6:04:37 AM EDT

Originally Posted By DPeacher:
I replaced the outside outlet covers last night. We are getting some rain here now, and the GFCI circuit in question is holding for now.

Thanks everyone!

Did you use the plastic covers? If so, change them out. The plastic ones are junk.

Go and get some good Crouse Hinds or equivalent metal covers. They last forever. If your local big box store doesn't carry them, find an electrical supply house nearby.
Link Posted: 9/7/2010 6:54:28 AM EDT
Originally Posted By VacaDuck:

Originally Posted By DPeacher:
I replaced the outside outlet covers last night. We are getting some rain here now, and the GFCI circuit in question is holding for now.

Thanks everyone!

Did you use the plastic covers? If so, change them out. The plastic ones are junk.

Go and get some good Crouse Hinds or equivalent metal covers. They last forever. If your local big box store doesn't carry them, find an electrical supply house nearby.


The replacement covers I purchased are metal with stiff springs and thick gaskets, they can also be locked with a small padlock if needed.
Link Posted: 9/8/2010 2:25:20 PM EDT
We've had over 5 inches of rain in the last 24 hours. The offending GFCI circuit has remained up and stable the entire time. Looks like this issue is resolved. Thanks again!
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