Warning

 

Close

Confirm Action

Are you sure you wish to do this?

Confirm Cancel
Member Login
Arrow Left Previous Page
Page / 3
Posted: 9/3/2010 3:14:16 AM EDT
http://savannahnow.com/news/2010-09-02/kingston-lower-age-drink-beer-or-win-military-posts-18

If 18 is old enough to lift a weapon in defense of your country, U.S. Rep. Jack Kingston says, it's old enough to lift a cold beer on base.

The Savannah Republican has introduced legislation that would let service members younger than 21 drink beer and wine at post restaurants and clubs.

People as young as 18 may enlist but now must be 21 or older to consume alcoholic beverages on post.

Kingston said he's thought about the matter as he's stood on the tarmac of Hunter Army Airfield as soldiers prepared to deploy for combat.

"There they are in their rucksacks," he said. "And they're going off to operate Abrams tanks and Black Hawk helicopters and squeeze the triggers on their M-4 rifles.

"We tell them they're responsible enough to do that and risk their lives, but not responsible enough to have a beer with their steak on post. I think that's an insult."

He said most people acknowledge many people under 21 drink even though it's illegal in most states.

"Society tends to wink at what we know is going on," he said. "I want us to address the issue responsibly when it comes to our military personnel."

He said he tried to tack a similar measure onto a measure that authorizes military programs earlier this year, but wasn't allowed to.

Kingston's bill only applies to situations where beer or wine is intended for immediate consumption. It would not let personnel buy it at post stores and take it to drink somewhere else.

There was no response Wednesday to requests for comment from spokesmen for Fort Stewart, Hunter Army Airfield or the Department of Defense.

Kingston spokesman Chris Crawford estimated that, as of March, about 28,000 of the military personnel deployed to Iraq were under 21.

The legislation was introduced and referred to the House Armed Services Committee on July 29, just before Congress recessed. It's due to reconvene later this month.

So far, Kingston has only one co-sponsor for his proposal, Gene Taylor, D-Miss.

"But we expect that number to increase once we're back in session," Crawford said.

But Kingston can expect support from Chatham County's other congressman, John Barrow of Savannah.

"I agree with Jack," Barrow said Wednesday. "I think if soldiers are old enough to fight alongside their fellow soldiers, they're old enough to have a beer with their fellow soldiers."

Barrow's GOP opponent, Ray McKinney, is also on board.

"It only makes sense that people who are willing to die for their country should be able to have a beer or glass of wine on base, especially in time of war," McKinney said.

But the bill faces a potential roadblock - Joe Wilson, R-S.C. Wilson is the top-ranked GOP member the Armed Services Committee's Subcommittee on Military Personnel.

"Although I normally see eye to eye with Congressman Kingston," Wilson said, "I oppose this particular piece of legislation. My concern is that lowering the drinking age for active duty service members could lead to alcohol abuse."

Kingston said he respects Wilson's views but he hopes he will at least help the legislation be considered.

"If people are solidly against it, fine," Kingston said. "But I really want a debate on it. Let's bring it to the House floor. I think it's a proper subject of debate.

"I think we owe it to the people who are helping create our freedom to have a mature discussion about theirs."

Link Posted: 9/3/2010 3:17:02 AM EDT
You can't drink on base at 18 already?
Link Posted: 9/3/2010 3:17:04 AM EDT
As far as I am concerned, if you are old enough to be drafted ( if we ever did have a draft) to fight for this country, you should be able to drink a beer on base or off
Link Posted: 9/3/2010 3:24:11 AM EDT
Did they raise the beer drinking age on base? We had beer machines in our squad bays at Camp Schwab, Okinawa in the early 90's.
Link Posted: 9/3/2010 3:26:01 AM EDT
They should just make the drinking age 18, it's not like its hard to get anyway non off the gas stations around here even card me(I'm 19).
Link Posted: 9/3/2010 3:27:49 AM EDT
I'm fine with that. I don't think the drinking age should be 18 for everyone, just that there should be no drinking age if you are in the military.
Link Posted: 9/3/2010 3:27:59 AM EDT
Should be parental consent at 16 and legal at 18. Fuck up while under the influence, get the book thrown at you.
Link Posted: 9/3/2010 3:32:26 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/3/2010 3:32:40 AM EDT by vaughn4380]
Originally Posted By JustinOK34:
I'm fine with that. I don't think the drinking age should be 18 for everyone, just that there should be no drinking age if you are in the military.


Right, because at 18 you can enter into legal contracts, vote for president, and buy guns, but drinking a beer is for the "mature" citizens.
Link Posted: 9/3/2010 4:07:06 AM EDT
Originally Posted By GseriesFal:
Did they raise the beer drinking age on base? We had beer machines in our squad bays at Camp Schwab, Okinawa in the early 90's.


The last time I looked, we weren't IN Okinawa!
Link Posted: 9/3/2010 4:27:16 AM EDT
Originally Posted By GseriesFal:
Did they raise the beer drinking age on base? We had beer machines in our squad bays at Camp Schwab, Okinawa in the early 90's.


Drinking ages vary by base.
Link Posted: 9/3/2010 4:32:51 AM EDT
I recall reading an article recently where the last Army Base that allowed drinking at age 18 decided to finally put a stop to it for some reason. It was in Texas.
Link Posted: 9/3/2010 4:39:33 AM EDT
Link Posted: 9/3/2010 4:41:05 AM EDT
Military bases generally follow local laws. In Germany, we could drink and buy alcohol at 18. In the US, it was always 21.
Link Posted: 9/3/2010 4:44:48 AM EDT
3.2 beer in Ohio....back in the old days....don't know when they changed the law.
Link Posted: 9/3/2010 4:45:38 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/3/2010 4:46:38 AM EDT by SilentType]
The logic behind the drinking age being 21 is that the human brain is not fully developed until the age of 21 (women develop their brains fully early, but men can take as long as 21). They claim that for every year before your brain is fully developed that you drink your chances of being addicted to alcohol increase. So someone who starts drinking at the age of 18 has a higher likelyhood of being an alcoholic than someone who starts drinking at the age of 21.

That's the argument anyways. They claim this argument is supported by scans of brains and clinical data, but I've never seen any of it.

Link Posted: 9/3/2010 4:47:20 AM EDT
You should become an adult at a certain age, then you can drive, drink, buy tobbaco and porn, get your own health insurance. I propose 26.
Link Posted: 9/3/2010 4:50:33 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Herc:
You should become an adult at a certain age, then you can drive, drink, buy tobbaco and porn, get your own health insurance. I propose 26.

I'm not giving up my porn or my drivers license!

Molon Labe!
Link Posted: 9/3/2010 4:52:20 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/3/2010 4:59:31 AM EDT by surveyor3]
Originally Posted By vaughn4380:
Originally Posted By JustinOK34:
I'm fine with that. I don't think the drinking age should be 18 for everyone, just that there should be no drinking age if you are in the military.


Right, because at 18 you can enter into legal contracts, vote for president, and buy guns, but drinking a beer is for the "mature" citizens.


I've always wondered how any right thinking person, conservative or not, could justify the 21 year age limit. It is complete bullshit.

You can work full time as fucking prison guard, go home to the house you own, and you will be arrested if found in possession of alcohol.
Link Posted: 9/3/2010 4:53:40 AM EDT
If I was in the position to propose a new drinking age this is what it would be:

18 years old or a high school diploma, which ever comes 2nd.

If you turn 18 while still in high school (I did, my birthday is in Feb), you have to wait until you graduate from high school. If you graduate under the age of 18, you have to wait until you are 18. If you do not graduate from high school, you have to wait until you are 21 years old.
Link Posted: 9/3/2010 4:58:36 AM EDT
Link Posted: 9/3/2010 5:02:35 AM EDT
Originally Posted By rangermonroe:
http://savannahnow.com/news/2010-09-02/kingston-lower-age-drink-beer-or-win-military-posts-18

If 18 is old enough to lift a weapon in defense of your country, U.S. Rep. Jack Kingston says, it's old enough to lift a cold beer on base.

The Savannah Republican has introduced legislation that would let service members younger than 21 drink beer and wine at post restaurants and clubs.

People as young as 18 may enlist but now must be 21 or older to consume alcoholic beverages on post.

Kingston said he's thought about the matter as he's stood on the tarmac of Hunter Army Airfield as soldiers prepared to deploy for combat.

"There they are in their rucksacks," he said. "And they're going off to operate Abrams tanks and Black Hawk helicopters and squeeze the triggers on their M-4 rifles.

"We tell them they're responsible enough to do that and risk their lives, but not responsible enough to have a beer with their steak on post. I think that's an insult."

He said most people acknowledge many people under 21 drink even though it's illegal in most states.

"Society tends to wink at what we know is going on," he said. "I want us to address the issue responsibly when it comes to our military personnel."

He said he tried to tack a similar measure onto a measure that authorizes military programs earlier this year, but wasn't allowed to.

Kingston's bill only applies to situations where beer or wine is intended for immediate consumption. It would not let personnel buy it at post stores and take it to drink somewhere else.

There was no response Wednesday to requests for comment from spokesmen for Fort Stewart, Hunter Army Airfield or the Department of Defense.

Kingston spokesman Chris Crawford estimated that, as of March, about 28,000 of the military personnel deployed to Iraq were under 21.

The legislation was introduced and referred to the House Armed Services Committee on July 29, just before Congress recessed. It's due to reconvene later this month.

So far, Kingston has only one co-sponsor for his proposal, Gene Taylor, D-Miss.

"But we expect that number to increase once we're back in session," Crawford said.

But Kingston can expect support from Chatham County's other congressman, John Barrow of Savannah.

"I agree with Jack," Barrow said Wednesday. "I think if soldiers are old enough to fight alongside their fellow soldiers, they're old enough to have a beer with their fellow soldiers."

Barrow's GOP opponent, Ray McKinney, is also on board.

"It only makes sense that people who are willing to die for their country should be able to have a beer or glass of wine on base, especially in time of war," McKinney said.

But the bill faces a potential roadblock - Joe Wilson, R-S.C. Wilson is the top-ranked GOP member the Armed Services Committee's Subcommittee on Military Personnel.

"Although I normally see eye to eye with Congressman Kingston," Wilson said, "I oppose this particular piece of legislation. My concern is that lowering the drinking age for active duty service members could lead to alcohol abuse."

Kingston said he respects Wilson's views but he hopes he will at least help the legislation be considered.

"If people are solidly against it, fine," Kingston said. "But I really want a debate on it. Let's bring it to the House floor. I think it's a proper subject of debate.

"I think we owe it to the people who are helping create our freedom to have a mature discussion about theirs."



Bullshit. What are they, a different class of citizen than civilians?
Link Posted: 9/3/2010 5:03:37 AM EDT
my grandson is 18 now, and i sent him in the house to get me a beer and told him to get one for himself. his granny jumped on me saying, ''he's too young, and it's illegal to give alcohol to minors'. i quickly told her, '' the boy is 18, and considering joining the army. if he is old enough to go serve, dodge bullets, possibly die or be crippled the rest of his life––- he can flat-ass drink a beer with his papaw before he goes''. 'i also explained to him that the law says ''no'' until 21, , don't drink away from here, in these woods, and you'll have no problems. he's a good responsible lad, and i enjoy sitting in the yard drinking a beer with him.-[and, you can't see my house from the road]
Link Posted: 9/3/2010 5:07:10 AM EDT
the very things that make a kid a good candidate as a soldier at the age of 18 makes it a bad idea to let them drink.

your congressman is an idiot

Link Posted: 9/3/2010 5:10:26 AM EDT
I don't understand why this needs to be restricted to military folks only. Everyone here is kidding themselves if they don't think people 18, 19, and 20 drink all the time. Of course it happens even younger than that.
Link Posted: 9/3/2010 5:11:42 AM EDT
Originally Posted By ckichinko:


Bullshit. What are they, a different class of citizen than civilians?


Actually yes, they are. They are federal citizens, on federal land.
Link Posted: 9/3/2010 5:12:20 AM EDT

Originally Posted By ckichinko:
Originally Posted By rangermonroe:
http://savannahnow.com/news/2010-09-02/kingston-lower-age-drink-beer-or-win-military-posts-18

If 18 is old enough to lift a weapon in defense of your country, U.S. Rep. Jack Kingston says, it's old enough to lift a cold beer on base.

The Savannah Republican has introduced legislation that would let service members younger than 21 drink beer and wine at post restaurants and clubs.

People as young as 18 may enlist but now must be 21 or older to consume alcoholic beverages on post.

Kingston said he's thought about the matter as he's stood on the tarmac of Hunter Army Airfield as soldiers prepared to deploy for combat.

"There they are in their rucksacks," he said. "And they're going off to operate Abrams tanks and Black Hawk helicopters and squeeze the triggers on their M-4 rifles.

"We tell them they're responsible enough to do that and risk their lives, but not responsible enough to have a beer with their steak on post. I think that's an insult."

He said most people acknowledge many people under 21 drink even though it's illegal in most states.

"Society tends to wink at what we know is going on," he said. "I want us to address the issue responsibly when it comes to our military personnel."

He said he tried to tack a similar measure onto a measure that authorizes military programs earlier this year, but wasn't allowed to.

Kingston's bill only applies to situations where beer or wine is intended for immediate consumption. It would not let personnel buy it at post stores and take it to drink somewhere else.

There was no response Wednesday to requests for comment from spokesmen for Fort Stewart, Hunter Army Airfield or the Department of Defense.

Kingston spokesman Chris Crawford estimated that, as of March, about 28,000 of the military personnel deployed to Iraq were under 21.

The legislation was introduced and referred to the House Armed Services Committee on July 29, just before Congress recessed. It's due to reconvene later this month.

So far, Kingston has only one co-sponsor for his proposal, Gene Taylor, D-Miss.

"But we expect that number to increase once we're back in session," Crawford said.

But Kingston can expect support from Chatham County's other congressman, John Barrow of Savannah.

"I agree with Jack," Barrow said Wednesday. "I think if soldiers are old enough to fight alongside their fellow soldiers, they're old enough to have a beer with their fellow soldiers."

Barrow's GOP opponent, Ray McKinney, is also on board.

"It only makes sense that people who are willing to die for their country should be able to have a beer or glass of wine on base, especially in time of war," McKinney said.

But the bill faces a potential roadblock - Joe Wilson, R-S.C. Wilson is the top-ranked GOP member the Armed Services Committee's Subcommittee on Military Personnel.

"Although I normally see eye to eye with Congressman Kingston," Wilson said, "I oppose this particular piece of legislation. My concern is that lowering the drinking age for active duty service members could lead to alcohol abuse."

Kingston said he respects Wilson's views but he hopes he will at least help the legislation be considered.

"If people are solidly against it, fine," Kingston said. "But I really want a debate on it. Let's bring it to the House floor. I think it's a proper subject of debate.

"I think we owe it to the people who are helping create our freedom to have a mature discussion about theirs."



Bullshit. What are they, a different class of citizen than civilians?

Yes.

They are government property, and volunteered to be so. You can't change your mind as can a civvie, and up and quit your job if found not to be your liking. Vets are given preference by employers who recognize the sacrifice and devotion to duty that is embodied in successful completion of enlistment.

I have no problem with rewarding that commitment and selfless devotion by relaxing the rules for those on active duty.

Further, the culture in the military already acknowledges that soldiers will imbibe and turns a blind eye for the most part to this activity.

Link Posted: 9/3/2010 5:24:36 AM EDT
Originally Posted By rangermonroe:

Originally Posted By ckichinko:
Originally Posted By rangermonroe:
http://savannahnow.com/news/2010-09-02/kingston-lower-age-drink-beer-or-win-military-posts-18

If 18 is old enough to lift a weapon in defense of your country, U.S. Rep. Jack Kingston says, it's old enough to lift a cold beer on base.

The Savannah Republican has introduced legislation that would let service members younger than 21 drink beer and wine at post restaurants and clubs.

People as young as 18 may enlist but now must be 21 or older to consume alcoholic beverages on post.

Kingston said he's thought about the matter as he's stood on the tarmac of Hunter Army Airfield as soldiers prepared to deploy for combat.

"There they are in their rucksacks," he said. "And they're going off to operate Abrams tanks and Black Hawk helicopters and squeeze the triggers on their M-4 rifles.

"We tell them they're responsible enough to do that and risk their lives, but not responsible enough to have a beer with their steak on post. I think that's an insult."

He said most people acknowledge many people under 21 drink even though it's illegal in most states.

"Society tends to wink at what we know is going on," he said. "I want us to address the issue responsibly when it comes to our military personnel."

He said he tried to tack a similar measure onto a measure that authorizes military programs earlier this year, but wasn't allowed to.

Kingston's bill only applies to situations where beer or wine is intended for immediate consumption. It would not let personnel buy it at post stores and take it to drink somewhere else.

There was no response Wednesday to requests for comment from spokesmen for Fort Stewart, Hunter Army Airfield or the Department of Defense.

Kingston spokesman Chris Crawford estimated that, as of March, about 28,000 of the military personnel deployed to Iraq were under 21.

The legislation was introduced and referred to the House Armed Services Committee on July 29, just before Congress recessed. It's due to reconvene later this month.

So far, Kingston has only one co-sponsor for his proposal, Gene Taylor, D-Miss.

"But we expect that number to increase once we're back in session," Crawford said.

But Kingston can expect support from Chatham County's other congressman, John Barrow of Savannah.

"I agree with Jack," Barrow said Wednesday. "I think if soldiers are old enough to fight alongside their fellow soldiers, they're old enough to have a beer with their fellow soldiers."

Barrow's GOP opponent, Ray McKinney, is also on board.

"It only makes sense that people who are willing to die for their country should be able to have a beer or glass of wine on base, especially in time of war," McKinney said.

But the bill faces a potential roadblock - Joe Wilson, R-S.C. Wilson is the top-ranked GOP member the Armed Services Committee's Subcommittee on Military Personnel.

"Although I normally see eye to eye with Congressman Kingston," Wilson said, "I oppose this particular piece of legislation. My concern is that lowering the drinking age for active duty service members could lead to alcohol abuse."

Kingston said he respects Wilson's views but he hopes he will at least help the legislation be considered.

"If people are solidly against it, fine," Kingston said. "But I really want a debate on it. Let's bring it to the House floor. I think it's a proper subject of debate.

"I think we owe it to the people who are helping create our freedom to have a mature discussion about theirs."



Bullshit. What are they, a different class of citizen than civilians?

Yes.

They are government property, and volunteered to be so. You can't change your mind as can a civvie, and up and quit your job if found not to be your liking. Vets are given preference by employers who recognize the sacrifice and devotion to duty that is embodied in successful completion of enlistment.

I have no problem with rewarding that commitment and selfless devotion by relaxing the rules for those on active duty.

Further, the culture in the military already acknowledges that soldiers will imbibe and turns a blind eye for the most part to this activity.




I have a fundamental problem with relaxing the rules for a certain part of the citizens and not the rest.
I didn't know being in the military made you exempt from some laws.
Link Posted: 9/3/2010 5:30:17 AM EDT
Only until the fed cuts the money off again.

Oh wait, wrong rant.

All this does is piss off non-mil.
Link Posted: 9/3/2010 5:30:34 AM EDT

Originally Posted By ckichinko:
Originally Posted By rangermonroe:

Originally Posted By ckichinko:
Originally Posted By rangermonroe:
http://savannahnow.com/news/2010-09-02/kingston-lower-age-drink-beer-or-win-military-posts-18

If 18 is old enough to lift a weapon in defense of your country, U.S. Rep. Jack Kingston says, it's old enough to lift a cold beer on base.

The Savannah Republican has introduced legislation that would let service members younger than 21 drink beer and wine at post restaurants and clubs.

People as young as 18 may enlist but now must be 21 or older to consume alcoholic beverages on post.

Kingston said he's thought about the matter as he's stood on the tarmac of Hunter Army Airfield as soldiers prepared to deploy for combat.

"There they are in their rucksacks," he said. "And they're going off to operate Abrams tanks and Black Hawk helicopters and squeeze the triggers on their M-4 rifles.

"We tell them they're responsible enough to do that and risk their lives, but not responsible enough to have a beer with their steak on post. I think that's an insult."

He said most people acknowledge many people under 21 drink even though it's illegal in most states.

"Society tends to wink at what we know is going on," he said. "I want us to address the issue responsibly when it comes to our military personnel."

He said he tried to tack a similar measure onto a measure that authorizes military programs earlier this year, but wasn't allowed to.

Kingston's bill only applies to situations where beer or wine is intended for immediate consumption. It would not let personnel buy it at post stores and take it to drink somewhere else.

There was no response Wednesday to requests for comment from spokesmen for Fort Stewart, Hunter Army Airfield or the Department of Defense.

Kingston spokesman Chris Crawford estimated that, as of March, about 28,000 of the military personnel deployed to Iraq were under 21.

The legislation was introduced and referred to the House Armed Services Committee on July 29, just before Congress recessed. It's due to reconvene later this month.

So far, Kingston has only one co-sponsor for his proposal, Gene Taylor, D-Miss.

"But we expect that number to increase once we're back in session," Crawford said.

But Kingston can expect support from Chatham County's other congressman, John Barrow of Savannah.

"I agree with Jack," Barrow said Wednesday. "I think if soldiers are old enough to fight alongside their fellow soldiers, they're old enough to have a beer with their fellow soldiers."

Barrow's GOP opponent, Ray McKinney, is also on board.

"It only makes sense that people who are willing to die for their country should be able to have a beer or glass of wine on base, especially in time of war," McKinney said.

But the bill faces a potential roadblock - Joe Wilson, R-S.C. Wilson is the top-ranked GOP member the Armed Services Committee's Subcommittee on Military Personnel.

"Although I normally see eye to eye with Congressman Kingston," Wilson said, "I oppose this particular piece of legislation. My concern is that lowering the drinking age for active duty service members could lead to alcohol abuse."

Kingston said he respects Wilson's views but he hopes he will at least help the legislation be considered.

"If people are solidly against it, fine," Kingston said. "But I really want a debate on it. Let's bring it to the House floor. I think it's a proper subject of debate.

"I think we owe it to the people who are helping create our freedom to have a mature discussion about theirs."



Bullshit. What are they, a different class of citizen than civilians?

Yes.

They are government property, and volunteered to be so. You can't change your mind as can a civvie, and up and quit your job if found not to be your liking. Vets are given preference by employers who recognize the sacrifice and devotion to duty that is embodied in successful completion of enlistment.

I have no problem with rewarding that commitment and selfless devotion by relaxing the rules for those on active duty.

Further, the culture in the military already acknowledges that soldiers will imbibe and turns a blind eye for the most part to this activity.




I have a fundamental problem with relaxing the rules for a certain part of the citizens and not the rest.
I didn't know being in the military made you exempt from some laws.

Did you notice the part where he is a law maker and proposing to change the law?

Here is another one to outrage you then: In my state, you are not allowed to carry a weapon concealed, unless you are a certain segment of the citizenry who volunteered some time and money, and because you behaved well in the past and agree not to participate in certain activity. If you meet that criteria, the state lets you carry a pistol around hidden from view.
Link Posted: 9/3/2010 5:32:51 AM EDT

Originally Posted By surveyor3:
Originally Posted By vaughn4380:
Originally Posted By JustinOK34:

I'm fine with that. I don't think the drinking age should be 18 for everyone, just that there should be no drinking age if you are in the military.

Right, because at 18 you can enter into legal contracts, vote for president, and buy guns, but drinking a beer is for the "mature" citizens.

I've always wondered how any right thinking person, conservative or not, could justify the 21 year age limit. It is complete bullshit.

You can work full time as fucking prison guard, go home to the house you own, and you will be arrested if found in possession of alcohol.

It's the fed cotrolling the purse strings, not about what is rational.
Link Posted: 9/3/2010 5:33:41 AM EDT
Isn't the USA one of the few countries that has 21 for a drinking age?

All it did was create a forbidden fruit that teens think is cool if they go out binge drinking.
Link Posted: 9/3/2010 5:37:11 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/3/2010 5:39:27 AM EDT by Glock63]
Should not be restricted to millitary. I was a professional firefighter at the age of 19. I was good enough to pull your ass out of a burning house but not have a beer?
Link Posted: 9/3/2010 5:37:40 AM EDT
Originally Posted By rangermonroe:

Originally Posted By ckichinko:
Originally Posted By rangermonroe:

Originally Posted By ckichinko:
Originally Posted By rangermonroe:
http://savannahnow.com/news/2010-09-02/kingston-lower-age-drink-beer-or-win-military-posts-18

If 18 is old enough to lift a weapon in defense of your country, U.S. Rep. Jack Kingston says, it's old enough to lift a cold beer on base.

The Savannah Republican has introduced legislation that would let service members younger than 21 drink beer and wine at post restaurants and clubs.

People as young as 18 may enlist but now must be 21 or older to consume alcoholic beverages on post.

Kingston said he's thought about the matter as he's stood on the tarmac of Hunter Army Airfield as soldiers prepared to deploy for combat.

"There they are in their rucksacks," he said. "And they're going off to operate Abrams tanks and Black Hawk helicopters and squeeze the triggers on their M-4 rifles.

"We tell them they're responsible enough to do that and risk their lives, but not responsible enough to have a beer with their steak on post. I think that's an insult."

He said most people acknowledge many people under 21 drink even though it's illegal in most states.

"Society tends to wink at what we know is going on," he said. "I want us to address the issue responsibly when it comes to our military personnel."

He said he tried to tack a similar measure onto a measure that authorizes military programs earlier this year, but wasn't allowed to.

Kingston's bill only applies to situations where beer or wine is intended for immediate consumption. It would not let personnel buy it at post stores and take it to drink somewhere else.

There was no response Wednesday to requests for comment from spokesmen for Fort Stewart, Hunter Army Airfield or the Department of Defense.

Kingston spokesman Chris Crawford estimated that, as of March, about 28,000 of the military personnel deployed to Iraq were under 21.

The legislation was introduced and referred to the House Armed Services Committee on July 29, just before Congress recessed. It's due to reconvene later this month.

So far, Kingston has only one co-sponsor for his proposal, Gene Taylor, D-Miss.

"But we expect that number to increase once we're back in session," Crawford said.

But Kingston can expect support from Chatham County's other congressman, John Barrow of Savannah.

"I agree with Jack," Barrow said Wednesday. "I think if soldiers are old enough to fight alongside their fellow soldiers, they're old enough to have a beer with their fellow soldiers."

Barrow's GOP opponent, Ray McKinney, is also on board.

"It only makes sense that people who are willing to die for their country should be able to have a beer or glass of wine on base, especially in time of war," McKinney said.

But the bill faces a potential roadblock - Joe Wilson, R-S.C. Wilson is the top-ranked GOP member the Armed Services Committee's Subcommittee on Military Personnel.

"Although I normally see eye to eye with Congressman Kingston," Wilson said, "I oppose this particular piece of legislation. My concern is that lowering the drinking age for active duty service members could lead to alcohol abuse."

Kingston said he respects Wilson's views but he hopes he will at least help the legislation be considered.

"If people are solidly against it, fine," Kingston said. "But I really want a debate on it. Let's bring it to the House floor. I think it's a proper subject of debate.

"I think we owe it to the people who are helping create our freedom to have a mature discussion about theirs."



Bullshit. What are they, a different class of citizen than civilians?

Yes.

They are government property, and volunteered to be so. You can't change your mind as can a civvie, and up and quit your job if found not to be your liking. Vets are given preference by employers who recognize the sacrifice and devotion to duty that is embodied in successful completion of enlistment.

I have no problem with rewarding that commitment and selfless devotion by relaxing the rules for those on active duty.

Further, the culture in the military already acknowledges that soldiers will imbibe and turns a blind eye for the most part to this activity.




I have a fundamental problem with relaxing the rules for a certain part of the citizens and not the rest.
I didn't know being in the military made you exempt from some laws.

Did you notice the part where he is a law maker and proposing to change the law?

Here is another one to outrage you then: In my state, you are not allowed to carry a weapon concealed, unless you are a certain segment of the citizenry who volunteered some time and money, and because you behaved well in the past and agree not to participate in certain activity. If you meet that criteria, the state lets you carry a pistol around hidden from view.


Clever. But I don't HAVE to be in the .mil, or really do anything else for that matter to get a CCW.
But hey, I guess I should just get used to military members getting special treatment right?

The reasoning for this law should go deeper than "If he can fight, he can drink."
It should be reevaluated based on the fact that being 18 makes you an adult, with responsibilities, not that your job is dangerous.
Link Posted: 9/3/2010 5:41:44 AM EDT
I totally agree with the old enough to fight, old enough to drink sentiment, however this was tried in Florida back in 72 causing a huge rise in alcohol related problems in the 18 to 21 crowd. When the law was repealed years later, statistics showed a dramatic drop in DUIs, wrecks, fights, and other issues from that same group. Just sayin!
Link Posted: 9/3/2010 5:48:32 AM EDT
Originally Posted By vaughn4380:
Originally Posted By JustinOK34:
I'm fine with that. I don't think the drinking age should be 18 for everyone, just that there should be no drinking age if you are in the military.


Right, because at 18 you can enter into legal contracts, vote for president, and buy guns, but drinking a beer is for the "mature" citizens.


An 18 YO can do those things and still maintain control of a car and not make a jag of himself. The latter, not so much. There is a reason for 21.
Link Posted: 9/3/2010 5:50:27 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/3/2010 5:52:32 AM EDT by Liberation]
Originally Posted By JustinOK34:
I'm fine with that. I don't think the drinking age should be 18 for everyone, just that there should be no drinking age if you are in the military.


I am 200% pro military, pro veteran and all the good stuff, but you don't think the drinking age should be 18 for everyone?

When I was 18, I am 20 now, I could buy long rifles, AR15's, shotguns, vote for president, sign legal contracts, etc etc, but I can't drink a cold bud light?

So your saying those of us who chose not to join an all volunteer military should be penalized? and have to wait? It's not like people don't already drink, you're kidding yourself if you think the 21 limit stops anyone. You guys are right, you're federal employees who are held to different standards, but the laws shouldn't be grossly different because some in the inner circle are allowed to take a life.
Link Posted: 9/3/2010 5:53:46 AM EDT
old enough to be drafted = old enough to encourage ALL the rights of society
Link Posted: 9/3/2010 5:55:13 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/3/2010 5:56:20 AM EDT by Infantry26]
I knew a guy that other soldiers had to buy cigarettes for as he was 17 until a month or two before the deployment. He died 2 months later in a Taliban ambush. I really have a hard time giving a fuck about those that don't think he is "man enough" or whatever to drink. Drinking age laws are dumb.

I broke them.
I'm pretty sure everyone I know broke them.

What good have they done?

What a big-government mandated waste of money.

ETA: I heard rumors of Ft. Sill, OK and whatever that Ft in El Paso is with 1AD being able to drink on post under 21 but I'm not 100% sure. I've never seen it.
Link Posted: 9/3/2010 6:13:14 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/3/2010 6:47:08 AM EDT by winxlite]
I think 3% beer and wine by the glass at 19(17 if you're in the military), liquor at 21, is a good compromise. There will still be under-aged kids the get a hold of alcohol, but at least it will be kids acting drunk from a couple of beers as opposed to stupid drunk from a few glasses of booze.
Link Posted: 9/3/2010 6:21:31 AM EDT
Originally Posted By chris782:
They should just make the drinking age 18, it's not like its hard to get anyway non off the gas stations around here even card me(I'm 19).


Even when they do card me they don't care at all, I'm 19 too. :)
Link Posted: 9/3/2010 6:29:05 AM EDT
Either you're an adult or your're not at 18. Since you can die for your country or be tried as an adult in a court of law, then you sure as shit can have a beer.
Link Posted: 9/3/2010 6:29:58 AM EDT
I'm for it.
Link Posted: 9/3/2010 6:33:40 AM EDT
Damn, in most of Europe there IS NO drinking age. In the UK at 16 you can have a drink with a meal (with parents present). Alcohol would be less of a big deal to the younger generation if they could all drink at 18.
Link Posted: 9/3/2010 6:35:21 AM EDT
Many states used to have 3.2% beer at 18, there used to be at least one 3.2 bar in every small town in South Dakota and I believe many of them were open on Sunday.

I think the Fed Gubment did away with it in the 80s
Link Posted: 9/3/2010 6:37:47 AM EDT
Then how about rifles/shotguns you can buy at 18, but handguns you must wait until 21? Can anyone explain that, and why that restriction for handguns hasn't been removed? Seems to me if you buy a rifle you have way more lethal ability/means than by owning a pistol.
Link Posted: 9/3/2010 6:43:36 AM EDT
I remember beer went from 17 to 19 to 21. I remember being nine years old and my dad sharing a 7 oz. bottle of Miller with me. That's all he let me have and said when you're 19 you can drink all the beer you want.
Link Posted: 9/3/2010 6:58:50 AM EDT
Originally Posted By surveyor3:
Originally Posted By vaughn4380:
Originally Posted By JustinOK34:
I'm fine with that. I don't think the drinking age should be 18 for everyone, just that there should be no drinking age if you are in the military.


Right, because at 18 you can enter into legal contracts, vote for president, and buy guns, but drinking a beer is for the "mature" citizens.


I've always wondered how any right thinking person, conservative or not, could justify the 21 year age limit. It is complete bullshit.

You can work full time as fucking prison guard, go home to the house you own, and you will be arrested if found in possession of alcohol.




Originally Posted By Liberation:
Originally Posted By JustinOK34:
I'm fine with that. I don't think the drinking age should be 18 for everyone, just that there should be no drinking age if you are in the military.


I am 200% pro military, pro veteran and all the good stuff, but you don't think the drinking age should be 18 for everyone?

When I was 18, I am 20 now, I could buy long rifles, AR15's, shotguns, vote for president, sign legal contracts, etc etc, but I can't drink a cold bud light?

So your saying those of us who chose not to join an all volunteer military should be penalized? and have to wait? It's not like people don't already drink, you're kidding yourself if you think the 21 limit stops anyone. You guys are right, you're federal employees who are held to different standards, but the laws shouldn't be grossly different because some in the inner circle are allowed to take a life.


I didn't say the age should remain 21 for everyone else nor did I say 18 makes a good age for a person to legally drink. I just said for military there should not have an age limit in regards to purchasing/consuming alcohol.

Furthermore, the amount of self-sacrifice someone lays upon the altar of freedom (its a blank check made payable to the United States of America) should definitely warrant that person to be able to drink. As a military member you are already held to much tighter standards, and you can get punished for plenty of things that civilians can not. Let them have a beer.

I'm not penalizing those that are not in the service, I'm rewarding those that are in the service.



Heck, I bet if the country allowed parents to give alcohol to their sons/daughters at maybe 15/16 (and only under supervision) it would lead to less problems down the road. It would be more commonplace, and less "I can't wait to try it" "or its fun because its wrong". In those other countries where teens are allowed to drink, they really don't seem to have the same alcohol issues our country has.
Link Posted: 9/3/2010 7:04:18 AM EDT
Originally Posted By SilentType:
The logic behind the drinking age being 21 is that the human brain is not fully developed until the age of 21 (women develop their brains fully early, but men can take as long as 21). They claim that for every year before your brain is fully developed that you drink your chances of being addicted to alcohol increase. So someone who starts drinking at the age of 18 has a higher likelyhood of being an alcoholic than someone who starts drinking at the age of 21.

That's the argument anyways. They claim this argument is supported by scans of brains and clinical data, but I've never seen any of it.



well then what about liberals.....their brains aren't fully developed at 40, lets ban them from drinking.
Link Posted: 9/3/2010 7:04:28 AM EDT
When I was 18, you could already drink beer in Oklahoma...if you call 3.2 beer.
Link Posted: 9/3/2010 7:10:37 AM EDT
NOT allowing a soldier/sailor to drink at 18, when they are risking their life for our country, is about as stupid as handing the keys of a 2-ton, 300+HP guided missile to a child (16 year old).


Lower the drinking age to 18, period...if you're going to enlist 18 year olds.

RAISE the driving age to 18.
Link Posted: 9/3/2010 7:14:02 AM EDT
Well if their brain isn't fully developed, we shouldn't take advantage of them and let them sign on the dotted line. If they serve, they should be entitled to all the the benefits of any other adult.
Arrow Left Previous Page
Page / 3
Top Top