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Posted: 4/9/2002 4:39:57 PM EDT
I have an Infiniti G20. The recommended plugs are platinum-tipped that are seven times the price of regular plugs. Is there any real advantage to be gained buying the platinum version?
Link Posted: 4/9/2002 4:46:10 PM EDT
Link Posted: 4/9/2002 4:46:25 PM EDT
not really.
Link Posted: 4/9/2002 4:50:35 PM EDT
No. Maybe if you were wanting to shave fractions of a second off your 1/4 time, but not for an Infiniti. It would be a waste of money.
Link Posted: 4/9/2002 4:51:11 PM EDT
You should try to stay within the factory recommondations. I assume that the G20 has a high output engine and may need quality plugs to maintain that good compression, reliable spark and high efficiency.
Link Posted: 4/9/2002 4:51:19 PM EDT
Well, they're supposed to last a lot longer. I think that's the only major difference.
Link Posted: 4/9/2002 4:56:58 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Mr-T: Well, they're supposed to last a lot longer. I think that's the only major difference.
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From personal experience, I would say that they do not last any longer than normal plugs.
Link Posted: 4/9/2002 5:17:49 PM EDT
WOW, a descussion about $6-10 spark plug for a $35,000+ car on a forum where guys put $1,000 scope/sights on $700 rifles?! If you own a $35,000+ auto you should spend the $40 for platinum plugs. I have seen some cars, particularly Honda's that won't run with anything but Honda plugs, go figure. Modern cars run lean and hot, platinum plugs only have a small thin platinum wire surrounded by porcelain and it is only exposed on the tip. This protect the wire from heat and erosion and the plugs last longer. Regular plugs with a large exposed metal electrodes will erode faster and performance will suffer. The ignition system was designed for that plug with a specific resistance level, heat range etc. Your car will be happier for it.
Link Posted: 4/9/2002 5:18:46 PM EDT
My 93 Chevy Suburban needs new plugs- I was thinking SplitFire, but not sure if I should just stay with stock. Anyone hear anything good about the splitfire's or splitfire platinum? Other brands?
Link Posted: 4/9/2002 5:49:00 PM EDT
Thanks TCROW! I have MUCH to learn about AR's but know a LOT about engines, use the recommended plugs. Most of todays computer controlled cars have requirements far different from the old 327 Chevys. To chance burning off an electrode and ruining either the ignition system, or even worse the engine isn't worth the chance. A 50,000 mile or greater interval to change plugs one of many benifits of this type of plug. I would suggest using anti-sieze on the threads when doing the change. Wanna have fun?? Try welding on, or incorrectly jump starting your late model car/truck.
Link Posted: 4/9/2002 5:52:49 PM EDT
Forgot to mention. It may be possible to find an aftermarket equivalent to your plug. Look for NGK or ND brands.
Link Posted: 4/9/2002 5:54:10 PM EDT
Personally for me they are worth it. The reason is that they last something like 36,000 miles. I change the plugs myself to save the labor, personally I'm at the point in my life, where I'm not all that enthusiastic about working on my car. I'd rather be shooting etc.
Link Posted: 4/9/2002 5:57:06 PM EDT
Originally Posted By TCROW: WOW, a descussion about $6-10 spark plug for a $35,000+ car on a forum where guys put $1,000 scope/sights on $700 rifles?!
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[:D] well put. i wish i had the money to spend on my guns like some of you. i prefer Bosch Platinum plugs. i have never had any problems with them. i think they are worth the extra money.
Link Posted: 4/9/2002 5:58:42 PM EDT
Originally Posted By ScrubJ: Most of todays computer controlled cars have requirements far different from the old 327 Chevys.
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See. That's the answer. Put a 327 in it. No problem!
Link Posted: 4/9/2002 6:05:31 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 4/9/2002 6:07:38 PM EDT by Andrewh]
Bosch platniums are only about 2 bucks a piece at auto zone. Not quite 2 times some good plugs. I would check the price of those plugs else where. I am unaware of any platnium tip single costing more than that. The multi 2 and 4 points are a bit pricey, but not worth the extra imo. But I do love the platniums, all my cars run with the bosch singles. Never had any problems. I once tried the champion gold tips, but went back to the platniums because they lasted longer.
Link Posted: 4/9/2002 6:21:08 PM EDT
Definitely not worth it in my opinion. I have a 96 Mitsu Eclipse spyder and after about 3-4 years I changed the original plugs and went with bosch platinum. They lasted about 11 months. This is the second time I've tried them (previously in a Honda), and both times they didn't seem to last as long as normal plugs. Personally I think it's a gimmick, but ymmv. On the other hand, if that's what came in the car from the mfg then it probably makes sense. If they sold it with copper plugs, then I certainly wouldn't bother replacing them with platinum.
Link Posted: 4/9/2002 6:58:01 PM EDT
Thank you all for the input. Some of you may have noted that I am posting from Mexico – Merida, Yucatan Peninsular, to be precise. I'm going to drive to Zihuatanejo next month, on some roads you may not wish to travel. The price for a regular plug is U$2. The price for a platinum plug is U$ 15.40 You don't get to buy a U$35,000 car without talking note of things like this. All I'm asking is: is it worth it – and, maybe, why?
Link Posted: 4/9/2002 7:13:45 PM EDT
If your manufacture says you have to use platinum plugs, you must do so. I have a Taurus SHO and I have to buy double-platinum plugs for my engine, but they are 60K plugs, when this engine was developed 1988(by yamaha I might add) it was one of the only cars that had 60K tuneup intervals, so thats the biggest reason behind platinum plugs. BTW sodie, a G20 is about the weakest engine out there, so you are not correct. I see no reason why your car requires platinum plugs, but if your manufacture says so, thats the way it is. (I've always thought Nissian was one of the few japanese auto makers that make peices of shit) Hopefully I didn't offend anyone, cause its the truth. I watched an old couple plow through one car at an intersection, run up a small grass hill, pushing 2 other cars in the parking lot out of the way, until it stop INSIDE a shopping center almost killing a few people, all cause the trottle stuck. It was one of those new Supercharged nissan trucks. WTF is up with those trucks, supercharged, and low 200's in horse power, F'in WEAKSAUCE!! Nissan needs to take Engines 101 or something.
Link Posted: 4/9/2002 8:20:34 PM EDT
Thank you for your input, MurderSHO45, and in fact, although it seems extreme, I probably will pay U$62 for some marginal improvement over a set of U$8 plugs – just to be on the safe side. I don't mind paying for value – it's being ripped-off I try to avoid and, with only a couple of exceptions, I have not really heard any decent technical reason justification for these platinum plugs. However, your wholesale slaying of the Nissan brand does, I feel, require some comment. I'd put a Nissan Maxima SE up against most Fords anytime. Furthermore, the G20 has reputation for being gutless that I have never experienced – other than by those who are afraid to use the revs available. Mine will do 70mph at 3,000rpm yet it only goes into the orange at 7200rpm – and will go to 9000rpm before exploding. Although it is the only FWD car I have ever owned, it has really impressed me as a small, two-liter, sedan. It's suspension capabilities over "El Espinoso del Diable" (Jurango, Mex) classed as 9th most difficult road in the world – left me quite impressed. And, if I use the revs, I can leave a hell-of-a-lotta faster cars in the dust. There is a difference between a fast car and a car that is quick. My previous three cars were the "89; 92 and 94 Mazda RX7's.
Link Posted: 4/9/2002 8:27:53 PM EDT
Here a good one on how sensative new cars are to changes. My neighbor is a Dodge service tech. He says on certain new cars if the gas cap is not on tight enough the "check engine" light comes on! How does it know? It amazing the ways the computers rule the cars. Seconding what someone else said on the anti-sieze, it's a must on aluminum heads and even more so with taper seat plugs.
Link Posted: 4/9/2002 8:29:31 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 4/9/2002 8:34:51 PM EDT by NHRAMark]
I would stick to what the manufacturer suggests, todays ignition systems are a far cry from the old points, plugs, condenser tune up. Most of todays systems are a DIS type, which means no distributor, many times there is no plug wires, coil on plug systems that operate at 60-100KV, thats 100,000 volts. These systems use what they call a waste spark system, where the spark jumps from the ground to the electrode on one bank, and from the electrode to the ground on the other cylinder bank. That is why they have gone to double platinum plating on both sides of the plug to reduce wear. Most double platinum plugs will go 100K with no problem with the plugs. The other problem with 100K tune up intervals is the possibility of the plugs seizing to the threads in the cylinder heads due to corrosion caused by two dissimilar metals. I am a Ford Senior Master Technician so I get to see these things on a daily basis! Also have owned 2 Taurus SHO's over the years, a 91 and a 95. Both great cars and true sleepers, 140mph plus with four doors!
Link Posted: 4/9/2002 10:55:31 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 4/9/2002 10:58:12 PM EDT by alfajim]
DO NOT USE PLATINUM PLUG UNLESS YOU CAR CAME ORIGINALLY WITH THEM. That being said this is what happened to my Mercedes using Bosch platinum plugs, while driving to go hunting last year one of the plug center electrodes broke out of the plug damaging an exhaust valve and requiring a 100 mile tow home. I did some searching on the web and found that this was not an unheard of and several people had seen this problem. When I bought this car it had the plugs in it and I simply replaced them with what was in it . The plug that failed was just over a year old and had less than 6000 miles on it. This was an expensive lesson. My Alfa Romeo uses $35 dollar platinum plugs and I have regular NGK plugs in it and it workes just fine I have put 50,000 miles on it with them in it.
Link Posted: 4/9/2002 11:47:29 PM EDT
Originally Posted By dissipator556: My 93 Chevy Suburban needs new plugs- I was thinking SplitFire, but not sure if I should just stay with stock. Anyone hear anything good about the splitfire's or splitfire platinum? Other brands?
View Quote
Go with AC Delco RapidFire spark plugs.
Link Posted: 4/10/2002 5:08:18 AM EDT
AC RAPID FIRE Darn, you beat me to it. Was just fixing to post the same thing. Rapid fire works on the principal of more exposed edges for the spark to jump to, in addition, the spark is not shrouded, it's exposed easily to the fuel air mixture it's trying to ignite and burn. My 2 cents. i Use to take regular sparkplugs, and take a points file to the side electrode. Filing it back from the edge of the center electrode to where it ends in the middle. This was available from champion on J gapped models in the 60's and 70's. Only side effect was slightly increased electrode wear from spark erosion. Absolutely much better throttle response. No doubt. You could feel it. Now with the splined shaft center electrode of Rapid fire, I get the same effect, even better. AC has tests to prove it. (Any plug using multiple electrodes in my educated guesss/opinion shrouds the spark and looses the benefit) I understand Rapid fire is now available plantinum tipped instead of copper core. Even better. Unfortunately, rear plugs are buried on my new v6 so not in a hurry to pay someone to change the plugs. M4-AK
Link Posted: 4/10/2002 5:11:53 AM EDT
Originally Posted By Boomer:
Originally Posted By dissipator556: My 93 Chevy Suburban needs new plugs- I was thinking SplitFire, but not sure if I should just stay with stock. Anyone hear anything good about the splitfire's or splitfire platinum? Other brands?
View Quote
Go with AC Delco RapidFire spark plugs.
View Quote
Split fire has these two large side electrodes shrouding the spark. In my opinon, that extra metal has to be a hindrance to flow in the combustion chamber and adds heatrange to the plug, a negative at high speeds. AC uses that splined center electrode. No fuss, no muss, no shrouding, no extra metal. M4-AK
Link Posted: 4/10/2002 7:32:46 AM EDT
Originally Posted By alfajim: this is what happened to my Mercedes using Bosch platinum plugs, while driving to go hunting last year
View Quote
Stylish.
Link Posted: 4/10/2002 9:24:54 AM EDT
It's a $20 something thousand car, at least it was when I got one.
Link Posted: 4/10/2002 10:30:10 AM EDT
Originally Posted By stcyr: Thank you for your input, MurderSHO45, and in fact, although it seems extreme, I probably will pay U$62 for some marginal improvement over a set of U$8 plugs – just to be on the safe side. I don't mind paying for value – it's being ripped-off I try to avoid and, with only a couple of exceptions, I have not really heard any decent technical reason justification for these platinum plugs. However, your wholesale slaying of the Nissan brand does, I feel, require some comment. I'd put a Nissan Maxima SE up against most Fords anytime. Furthermore, the G20 has reputation for being gutless that I have never experienced – other than by those who are afraid to use the revs available. Mine will do 70mph at 3,000rpm yet it only goes into the orange at 7200rpm – and will go to 9000rpm before exploding. Although it is the only FWD car I have ever owned, it has really impressed me as a small, two-liter, sedan. It's suspension capabilities over "El Espinoso del Diable" (Jurango, Mex) classed as 9th most difficult road in the world – left me quite impressed. And, if I use the revs, I can leave a hell-of-a-lotta faster cars in the dust. There is a difference between a fast car and a car that is quick. My previous three cars were the "89; 92 and 94 Mazda RX7's.
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Ummm my friend owns a G20 and my firends parents own a brand new one, and I was just in it the other. Those engines are gutless. Car is kinda heavy for a smaller car, and the engine has nill power. Remember, just cause it "REVS" high doesnt mean its actually moving faster. You'll find your cars peak HP is at a certain RPM, your car will actually be quicker if you shift at that point. The Butt dyno may say its faster to Rev engine out, but if you were to put your car on a real dyno you would see that what I say is true.
Link Posted: 4/10/2002 10:33:12 AM EDT
Originally Posted By NHRAMark: I would stick to what the manufacturer suggests, todays ignition systems are a far cry from the old points, plugs, condenser tune up. Most of todays systems are a DIS type, which means no distributor, many times there is no plug wires, coil on plug systems that operate at 60-100KV, thats 100,000 volts. These systems use what they call a waste spark system, where the spark jumps from the ground to the electrode on one bank, and from the electrode to the ground on the other cylinder bank. That is why they have gone to double platinum plating on both sides of the plug to reduce wear. Most double platinum plugs will go 100K with no problem with the plugs. The other problem with 100K tune up intervals is the possibility of the plugs seizing to the threads in the cylinder heads due to corrosion caused by two dissimilar metals. I am a Ford Senior Master Technician so I get to see these things on a daily basis! Also have owned 2 Taurus SHO's over the years, a 91 and a 95. Both great cars and true sleepers, 140mph plus with four doors!
View Quote
Ahhhhhh, someone who knows a thing or 2 about a thing or 2. My SHO is on its last leg, my somewhat mechinic skills have kept it alive for the last few years. Still gets it on though!!
Link Posted: 4/10/2002 1:02:57 PM EDT
Never saw a need for the Ford SLO, errr SHO.
Link Posted: 4/10/2002 1:15:33 PM EDT
Originally Posted By dissipator556: Never saw a need for the Ford SLO, errr SHO.
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What kind of a comment is that? Never saw the need for any automobile, but it just so happens I need to get to work and the range. For me it worked out good, I drive when I'm at work (computer consultant) so I need good gas mileage, I wanted car that wasn't completely gutless, and I needed bang for the buck all under $4K. SHO is hard to beat when these requirements come into play. So the "need" was there I guess. Your probably mad because your Ford Festiva you got at the local dealership for $10K isn't working out for you. That and your Plymouth minivan broke down on you the other day. Ya Freak.
Link Posted: 4/10/2002 1:35:33 PM EDT
Trying to boost output with sparkplugs is pretty pointless. Your gains are minimal and in a passenger sedan, likely its especially pointless. If your car came with platinum tipped plugs, put them back in. They have, on average a 60,000 mile replacement interval so you buy less plugs. The ignition system was designed with a certain plug in mind, and though many companies want to sell you products by declaring great increases in performance or economy, they are trying to SELL you something. If your car came with non-platinum tipped sparkplugs, put those in. They don't last 60,000 miles so you buy more plugs. On average, with a 60,000 mile replacement schedule, how many times is the average owner going to replace the platinum plugs? Twice? Twice would get you to 180,000 miles. Finally, it is pointless to judge the quality of an entire category of a product (platinum tipped sparkplugs) by anecdotes about a certain brand (Bosch for instance).
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