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Posted: 4/5/2002 10:32:22 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 4/5/2002 10:33:05 AM EDT by Meat-man]
Am going to repaint the interior of my home this summer. what are the advantages and disadvantages of rolling paint versus spraying. I really wish to spray this way it avoids having to paint the inside corners with a brush but have heard the overspray from spraying is a problem. Thanks for any advice
Link Posted: 4/5/2002 12:02:35 PM EDT
After years of painting my own homes with a roller... Get an airless sprayer. Not those wimpy Wagner hand jobs, but a sprayer where you use the 5 gal bucket for paint. Rent it if you have to. Clear out the room of ALL furniture, plastic over the carpet and windows, spray. Goes on quickly. You will be done in 1/4 the time of actual painting over a roller. Plus I find it a lot more fun with the sprayer. Just my thoughts.
Link Posted: 4/5/2002 12:23:06 PM EDT
I would consider all of the taping you will have to do........ you may save time with out the brushwork, but, if you have trim, windows brick, or anything else you don't want to paint, you will have to tape them off. I own my own painting company and I never spray the interior of a occupied house. I guess my 2 cents suggestion is to stick with the roller and brush. You can feel free to email me with any questions that you might have, I would be glad to help out with advice. I don't like to paint anymore than the next guy!
Link Posted: 4/5/2002 11:06:18 PM EDT
When I was a kid, I used to have a summer job helping my uncle paint apartment interiors. We only used rollers and it always turned out nice. As mentioned above, spraying indoors, especially when it is your house, ain't such a good idea.
Link Posted: 4/5/2002 11:32:17 PM EDT
It completely depends on the context of the situation. If you are doing a remodel of a room-screw the carpet-spray that SOB. If you are just re-painting, and you have kids (aka-slave labor) then a roller and brush will do. If the house is big, had a smoker in it, or needs priming-airless is the only way to go. Remember, it will be summer, and there is only so much fun you can have gettin high off of fumes while drinking beer and listening to Jimmy Buffet while painting your house. Are you going to do the ceilings as well? Good luck!
Link Posted: 4/6/2002 6:24:43 AM EDT
Roller. Cheaper, and if you have to do a lot of painting. Good luck, did the outside of mine last year, this year is the inside! c-rock
Link Posted: 4/6/2002 6:34:11 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 4/6/2002 6:34:44 AM EDT by Chaingun]
I knew someone with apartment building and for ease he would just spray the interior, and then lay new carpeting. For a quality job, use a roller and brush for trim. I just ordered a Campbell Hausfeld rebuilt airless sprayer for the outside. Last time I used a cheapo Wagner and did the stucco in one day. (spelling)
Link Posted: 4/6/2002 7:06:57 AM EDT
Link Posted: 4/6/2002 7:28:00 AM EDT
I usually spray, er, nevermind......
Link Posted: 4/6/2002 10:40:47 AM EDT
I prefer rolling and so did the guys that recently painted some of our house on the inside. They sprayed the outside though. Takes a while to setup with a sprayer and a while to clean the unit. Painting is quick.
Link Posted: 4/6/2002 11:52:04 AM EDT
For new construction with no carpet on the floors and trim on the windows and doors or cabinets to deal with, I would spray. For a re-paint with carpet, trim and cabinets, I would roll. I do like the idea of the power roller though. Just my .02.
Link Posted: 4/8/2002 7:33:50 AM EDT
thanks for the advice guys. I will probaly roll the wall but the headache is the trim. I am planning to replace all the dark wood trim and doors and paint it white. No matter how hard I try i have had hard time not laeving brush marks on the trim.All the new construction house I have seen the paint on the trim is smooth.I know they paint it before the carpet is laid but what is the secret to painting trim without laeving brush marks??? Thanks again
Link Posted: 4/8/2002 7:53:13 AM EDT
Link Posted: 4/8/2002 10:50:59 AM EDT
If you paint a door laid flat on some saw horses the enamel paint will flow out and look good even if you use a brush or roller. Spraying is even better.
Link Posted: 4/8/2002 11:18:57 AM EDT
Originally Posted By Meat-man: thanks for the advice guys. I will probaly roll the wall but the headache is the trim. I am planning to replace all the dark wood trim and doors and paint it white. No matter how hard I try i have had hard time not laeving brush marks on the trim.All the new construction house I have seen the paint on the trim is smooth.I know they paint it before the carpet is laid but what is the secret to painting trim without laeving brush marks??? Thanks again
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Get yourself one of those foot long mudder tools, to put on drywall compound. Cover what you dont want painted. sharper the edge, the better. Make sure you have a rag, and paint, then clean the edge off when done with that section. Get what I am saying? c-rock
Link Posted: 4/8/2002 1:21:01 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 4/8/2002 1:26:54 PM EDT by goldkey]
For the trim use oil base semi gloss, interior enamel. Use penetrol to keep your paint smooth. Use a good brush like a corona or purdy. Penetrol is just an additive for oil paint, it keeps the paint from getting tacky right away so you can get more paint on the trim, then smooth it out. Your trim will not look as good as a new house because I'm willing to bet they spray it but yours will look good. Oh, use killz for the 1st, and if needed, 2nd coats. Sand in between killz and enamel. Killz is a breeze to sand.
Link Posted: 4/8/2002 1:31:30 PM EDT
Hire an insured painter to do it. Painting is a pain in the butt! I just hate painting! If you're not married and have no spousal unit inspecting behind you, it might be ok.... If she does inspect, don't let her look at it until it's dry....they NEVER believe the statement "It looks darker cause it's wet" My .02 cents I once read a book that said if you love to do it yourself go right ahead, but think about the fact that you could be doing your own job and getting paid for the time you're using to do it yourself and you get no guarantee....hmmmm
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