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Posted: 4/2/2002 6:40:39 AM EDT
Last night, "Bones", our Lab/Shep/Husky mix 80lb. 1 1/2 year-old dog chased down my 6 year-old daughter while growling at her. She got down on the floor and he started in on her. I intervened and grabbed him by the jowls and told him 'NO!'...whereupon he bared his teeth and growled at ME! We don't beat this animal or mistreat him in any way. I got him as a puppy so the kids would have a dog while they were young and so we'd have a 'roving security unit'. He's been good up to this point. I'm inclined to take him to the pound before he jumps the fence and takes out somebody elses kid. Don't want to, but, I don't feel like losing in a lawsuit either. Should I unload the dog?
Link Posted: 4/2/2002 6:50:37 AM EDT
my .02, Set the dog up for failure. Put the dog in a situation where it may growl or get pissed off and as soon as it growls or behaves aggressivly, bring the PAIN. You are the "alpha" in the house, followed by the wife and kids. The dog needs to know this and apparently doesn't. Its easy to be smarter than a dog. Remember, they are still 99% wolf, especially socially. They need to know their place in the "pack." OR, put a .22 behind its ear and get an alarm system. Glad your little girl wasn't bitten. Was she doing anything to provoke the dog? Its not an excuse but it helps to understand the behavior. -V
Link Posted: 4/2/2002 6:52:26 AM EDT
Flip the dog on its back and grab it by the throat until it yields. Do this several times a day until the dog learns who's boss. It ain't him.
Link Posted: 4/2/2002 6:53:43 AM EDT
Pinch him on the neck, while growling "gerr, geerrr". That's what his momma did to discipline him. It will work. You definitely have to show him you are the Alpha Male.
Link Posted: 4/2/2002 6:57:26 AM EDT
Link Posted: 4/2/2002 6:59:46 AM EDT
Was the dog sleeping ? If not it is a space/dominance thing. He thought that space was his and was defending it. This needs to be corrected, but it is not a reason to get rid of the dog. Almost all dogs will try to see how far they can go in the pack, since the dog is a pet, you are the pack. You and your family need to be stern and show him the pecking order. I have trained and worked with a lot of dogs, i have never used pain and believe it will only make things worse as well as breaking his spirit.
Link Posted: 4/2/2002 7:03:22 AM EDT
They are right, you need to show the dog who is boss. If after a few weeks of being reduced to "beta" or lower status, it doesn't figure it out or continues with aggressive behavior, the dog will have to go. Take it to the vet and have it put to sleep, or if you and the family can stomach it, tie it to a post outside and put a bullet in it's head. I suggest the vet for your child's sake, plus you risk fewer complications with the neighbors. Do not foist an aggressive dog on some other unsuspecting family.
Link Posted: 4/2/2002 7:04:46 AM EDT
Link Posted: 4/2/2002 7:11:00 AM EDT
This morning I stood before him and he put his paw up to shake. Then, he rolled over, belly up. I've done the 'flip the dog' trick before. It seems it sunk in a little bit, just not enough. Maybe I'm overreacting. I'd prefer to keep him. Been a while since I exerted the 'dominance' around here. I've avoided some of the traits my Dad had when I was growing up, mainly the excessive force. Then again, it didn't really hurt me any. It's the PC world and the effort not to get in trouble with the law, I guess. If I spanked my kids in public, I'd get CPS at the door. If I whack my dog, PETA might show up instead. Any more tips are welcome.
Link Posted: 4/2/2002 7:13:32 AM EDT
Originally Posted By icemanat95: Take it to the vet and have it put to sleep, or if you and the family can stomach it, tie it to a post outside and put a bullet in it's head. I suggest the vet for your child's sake, plus you risk fewer complications with the neighbors. Do not foist an aggressive dog on some other unsuspecting family.
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if clarifying the social order doesnt work, you could always try to find a more appropriate home for your (former) pet, possibly one with a fence and no small children. why harm the dog if you dont have to?
Link Posted: 4/2/2002 7:18:54 AM EDT
Your dog [b]might[/b] have too much alpha Husky in it. Be careful, BusMaster.
Link Posted: 4/2/2002 7:22:29 AM EDT
Since we have a dog behavior topic and you guys seem to share some good advise, I might as well throw my question out also. I have a husky/rott mix who will be 9 years old this month. She is very nervous all the time, i.e. doesn't like to be pet or handled, things like that, other then to have her ears scratched. I have 2 little ones at home (4 & 2 this summer) and she seems to be very conscientious of their safety, but stays away from them most of the time. If neighborhood kids run down the alley past our fence she will bark while running along with them. She loves to go roller blading with me and usually sleeps on my daughter's bed at night. I thought that with age she would start to slow down, but she is just so jittery. Any advise on how to calm her? Thanks.
Link Posted: 4/2/2002 7:34:40 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 4/2/2002 7:39:57 AM EDT by Avalon01]
We have a large Akita that went thru a phase at about 1. He growled at my sister when she was going to slap him on his butt for running around with her shoe. We had to hurt him. Never "abused" him, but we made sure he knew the plants in the house were higher on the totem pole than him. He is now a very good dog, and has never snapped, growled, or barred his teeth at us. I can take food from him while he is eating it and he will just stand there. He never needed a second learning experience. Av.
Link Posted: 4/2/2002 7:36:05 AM EDT
Link Posted: 4/2/2002 7:37:55 AM EDT
Originally Posted By BusMaster007: If I whack my dog, PETA might show up instead.
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Whacking the dog doesn't really work, especially after the fact when he doesn't know why he is being whacked. I was playing with my dog off the leash once when he decided it would be fun to play "stay away" and refused to let me catch him. I finally did and tagged him good. A little swat on the rear (probably not the best choice) and a nice hard pinch, shake on the neck with an accompanying "ahhh, ahhh, ahh" dog sound. That was 3 years ago. To this day I can get serious with him and he will sit down, shake his tale a little and totally submit. I only had to do it once, and he KNOWS who the Alpha is.
Link Posted: 4/2/2002 7:46:21 AM EDT
Do it for the children. Goodbye Doggy!....Two go out, but only one come back...
Link Posted: 4/2/2002 7:49:54 AM EDT
For large dogs, hitting him and choking him is useless, try to knock on his nose, or bite him on the nose or mouth. Not everytime, but it's most effective way to insert the dominance at that instant. Also constant positive enforcement, sometimes, dogs get neglected, they do let it out on the kids or other family members they think have less status than them. So include your dog in your social activities also helps.
Link Posted: 4/2/2002 8:02:01 AM EDT
Originally Posted By raf: Notwithstanding the good advice above, I'd be unwilling to put my kid at risk. AT A MINIMUM, seperate the dog from the family and begin some intensive training, preferably with the help of an expert. If this is not feasable, get rid of the dog. IMHO, YMMV.
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I agree 100%. In addition, while YOU may be able to establish dominance and the alpha male position, your daughter will not. She is the one at risk, as is anyone else the dog "thinks" he can dominate. This isn't a puppy, and while you *may* be able to expect him to become less aggressive as he gets older, he may also become *more* cranky, like some of us... Good luck!
Link Posted: 4/2/2002 8:37:00 AM EDT
Link Posted: 4/2/2002 8:38:11 AM EDT
AR_Rifle
Do it for the children. Goodbye Doggy!....Two go out, but only one come back...
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I'll second this. What are you waiting for? The dog to bite you or someone else. A dog gets one chance like this and he is gone in my book. How can you ever fully trust him around kids again?
Link Posted: 4/2/2002 8:45:22 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 4/2/2002 8:48:18 AM EDT by rogerb]
To all you saying get rid of the dog now, if the dog wanted to bite he would have, don't doubt that for a minute, since he did not this proves that he already has a pretty good idea of where he stands. It is totaly natural for a pack animal to challenge its leadership, a pack survives and functions becuase this behavior insures the strongest will be the leader,but it should not happen more than one or two times, if it does then you are being too submissive or have a problem dog, and there are professionals who will correct this.
Link Posted: 4/2/2002 9:11:51 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 4/2/2002 9:15:13 AM EDT by GodBlessTexas]
Originally Posted By BusMaster007: Last night, "Bones", our Lab/Shep/Husky mix 80lb. 1 1/2 year-old dog chased down my 6 year-old daughter while growling at her. She got down on the floor and he started in on her. I intervened and grabbed him by the jowls and told him 'NO!'...whereupon he bared his teeth and growled at ME!
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Originally Posted By BusMaster007: Maybe I'm overreacting. I'd prefer to keep him.
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I'm sorry, but how do you rectify those two statements with each other? Who's more important to you, your dog or your daughter? Regardless as to what's to blame or who's responsible for this behavior, if a dog ever threatened my family, regardless of whether he's the family pet, he needs to be removed from the situation. Then again, I can show you the scars my wife has on her face, under her chin, and on her scalp from the dog that attacked her when she was a child while she was playing in her grandmothers back yard. She survived by accepting her fate and just laid limp while the dog mauled her until he thought she was dead and then trotted back to his yard. She then got up, went into the house, and saw parts of her face, neck and scalp ripped off in the mirror. Fortunately she was patched up by an excellent plastic surgeon, and had she not told me I would not have known. But any dog that bares down on your family doesn't know his place, and is a danger to them. You either immediately rectify the situation, which on a grown dog isn't going to be quick and easy, or you put the animal down. I'd personally err on the side of caution and have the animal put down, but it's your family, not mine. God Bless Texas
Link Posted: 4/2/2002 11:24:08 AM EDT
Most dogs do not reach full "adult" status until at least 2 years of age - there is still some "puppy" in him. There is still time to prove to him that you are his master. I hope things work out well for you & Bones. There has been a lot of good advise here - I hope it works for you/him [:)] If you try your best and are still uncomfortable with him, then get rid of him. Just my .02 Tyler
Link Posted: 4/2/2002 12:03:19 PM EDT
Heres a great discussion board on Rotts in case anyone is interested. Especially the topics regarding discipline and behavior - lots of long time Rottie owners/handlers/trainers. Seeing that most of the disciplinary advise works on Rotts, they certainly can be adapted to other dogs in general. [url]http://www.rottweiler.net/forums/index.php[/url]
Link Posted: 4/2/2002 12:22:42 PM EDT
Link Posted: 4/2/2002 12:30:15 PM EDT
GET RID OF THE DOG BEFORE YOU REGRET IT!!!
Link Posted: 4/2/2002 12:34:41 PM EDT
Link Posted: 4/2/2002 1:42:48 PM EDT
BusMaster007, I'm an animal lover and I can't remember when I didn't have a dog. I think getting your dog to a new good home or putting him down (if you can't find the right enviorment for him) might be your best option. Please don't take this in the wrong way, but it appears that you didn't teach him properly for this period of his life and to think starting today he will be on a new training regiment just seems like a bit of a streach considering what is at stake doesn't it? By no means am I perfect. I had to put down one of my favorite pets that I had for years because she didn't like my daughter coming into our lives. Good luck on your decission. Andy
Link Posted: 4/2/2002 1:49:41 PM EDT
My father had a rather large German Sheppard. When my older brother was new to the house the dog tried to establish a pecking order. My Dad beat the dog so severely that when my brother crawled into the room the dog left. I had my Rottie test me once. Took him outside into the back yard and got the hose. Then I began to discipline him, evertime he growled, showed teeth, etc. he got a face full of water. After about 10 mins. he was a wet, whipped puppy. You "might" have a chance to condition this dog, but that is YOUR call. The dog does need to associate your child with your protection of it.
Link Posted: 4/3/2002 6:41:52 AM EDT
Wow. Thank you all for the input. I'll be checking out those links. I put in a lot 'Windshield Time' yesterday and didn't get a chance to interact as soon as I would have liked to. Looks like I have a bit of work to do here. Could be I mixed up the 'kinder and gentler' dog owner with being a WUSS. I will take the matter in hand and control it, one way or the other. For the harsher comments, I don't disagree. The kids want to keep the dog. I won't allow the dog to assert himself in any way ever again. The order will be established and reaffirmed. NOW. Should the dog not understand, he'll be outta here. Thanks again for the intelligent input; it's why I hang out here.
Link Posted: 4/3/2002 6:51:43 AM EDT
If I may help you in any way, please shoot me an e-mail with your phone number, and I will give you a call to help with ideas. I have a lot of experience with breeding and socializing American Pit Bull Terriers, and would be more than happy to help out in any way that I could! Eric (TylerDurden) AR15/Handguns STAFF
Link Posted: 4/3/2002 6:58:05 AM EDT
once a dog bites his master, you must kill it. make it bite you aggresivly and then kill it [beer] then get a beer.
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