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Posted: 3/22/2002 4:32:48 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/22/2002 6:04:09 PM EDT by bushmaster1]
i saw an n.o.s type kit for an atv fourwheeler like a banshee. i was woundering if anyone knows were to get one?
Link Posted: 3/22/2002 5:15:46 PM EDT
This should get you pointed in the right direction... [url]www.nitrousinfo.com/buy.html[/url] OR... [url]www.nitrousexpress.com/atv.htm[/url]
Link Posted: 3/22/2002 5:35:53 PM EDT
Do you drag your banshee? I remember the yearly ice drags in WI on frozed lake Winnebago. I would stud up my YZ250 and drive around the beer tent and show-off. I can imagine the problems in adding a NO2 kit to a 2-stroke motor. Especially a tweaky 350 twin Banshee. Im not sure on the specifics but, I'm sure a jetting change is in order and perhaps a different piston and compression ratio. I would guess that you can plan on performing a pre-mature rebuild (cyl re-plate, piston, and rings) after the juice lets loose. Whats the protocol for a NOS bolt on?
Link Posted: 3/22/2002 5:48:51 PM EDT
I'm pretty sure all the 2-stroke kits are "dry" systems... Meaning there is no fuel enrichment system... They just inject straight Nitrous into the intake... My experience with nitrous is extensive with race engines on leaded race gas... Same rule of thumb applies though... Start out rich on the fuel side and conservative, don't get greedy... High octane race gas is a must, and retard your timing a few degrees... This will keep you out of trouble... Only way you will melt down a motor is if you run lean, or detonate...(poor fuel or too much timing) I'd suggest contacting the kit manufacturer for specific applications and advice... Just thought I'd throw in my $.02...
Link Posted: 3/22/2002 6:04:30 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/22/2002 6:04:48 PM EDT by Boomholzer]
Originally Posted By Dragracer_Art: I'm pretty sure all the 2-stroke kits are "dry" systems... Meaning there is no fuel enrichment system... They just inject straight Nitrous into the intake... My experience with nitrous is extensive with race engines on leaded race gas... Same rule of thumb applies though... Start out rich on the fuel side and conservative, don't get greedy... High octane race gas is a must, and retard your timing a few degrees... This will keep you out of trouble... Only way you will melt down a motor is if you run lean, or detonate...(poor fuel or too much timing) I'd suggest contacting the kit manufacturer for specific applications and advice... Just thought I'd throw in my $.02...
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I am pretty sure they are dry also. The jetting (fixed) would determine the fuel (premix) richness realtive to air. Therefore I imagine you would have to "rejet" to a bigger main and pilot jet. 2-stroke MX and banshee motors are funny when it comes to compression ratio. It is quite variable over RPM. My yz-125 varies over 3points across the usable RPM range. Operating temperature also a a great effect on the compression ratio, being lower when the motor is cold. Spark timing is ofcourse adjustable but, not as easy as a mechanical V8 distributer. I believe "blk boxes" are available to retard the ignition (spark) in such applications.
Link Posted: 3/22/2002 10:11:00 PM EDT
Have a nitrous on my Banshee through Trinity Racing(ph800-458-3101). Here's some pics of the machine and the nitrous system located under the seat. [img]http://mediaservice.photoisland.com/auction/Mar/20023224667961764539743.jpg[/img] [img]http://mediaservice.photoisland.com/auction/Mar/20023221820275485365541.jpg[/img]
Link Posted: 3/23/2002 10:26:27 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/23/2002 10:26:57 AM EDT by kato4moto]
Originally Posted By Boomholzer: 2-stroke MX and banshee motors are funny when it comes to compression ratio. It is quite variable over RPM. My yz-125 varies over 3points across the usable RPM range. Operating temperature also a a great effect on the compression ratio, being lower when the motor is cold.
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Now someone correct me if I'm wrong, but IIRC compression ratio varies ONLY in two-stroke engines that have power valves. The Banshee, lacking that feature (though the RZ350 upon which it's based does have it since it has a battery to run the electronically controlled valves in that application), should not fluctuate when it comes to compression ratio. Again, that's only IIRC and my $00.02. [:)]
Link Posted: 3/25/2002 7:10:34 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/25/2002 7:12:43 AM EDT by Boomholzer]
Originally Posted By kato4moto:
Originally Posted By Boomholzer: 2-stroke MX and banshee motors are funny when it comes to compression ratio. It is quite variable over RPM. My yz-125 varies over 3points across the usable RPM range. Operating temperature also a a great effect on the compression ratio, being lower when the motor is cold.
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Now someone correct me if I'm wrong, but IIRC compression ratio varies ONLY in two-stroke engines that have power valves. The Banshee, lacking that feature (though the RZ350 upon which it's based does have it since it has a battery to run the electronically controlled valves in that application), should not fluctuate when it comes to compression ratio. Again, that's only IIRC and my $00.02. [:)]
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Variance in compression ratio due to operating temperature is easy to explain. The piston and cylinder have differnt expasion coeffieciants relative to temperature. i.e. one expands faster than the other (piston). A MX bike piston is actually slightly tapered. As is heats up due to friction and combustion events (always hotter on top than bottom) it becomes a uniform slug. Yes, I believe it is due to the power valve and you are correct. However, Im having a hard time explaining why. I once thought that RPM had some effect on piston ring seating and that would explain the CR variance but, that sounds like a poor aurgument. Power valve either mechanically or electrically actuated simply adjust the visible (as seen by cylinder) exhaust port size. Compression ratio is defined by: CR = ( V1 + V2 ) / V2 CR is compression ratio V1 is cylinder volume at exhaust closing V2 is combustion chamber volume Perhaps when the power valve (often two parallel rods with a flat side that rotate to exposes that flatside between themselves, effectly making a larger "hole" ot poer diameter) opens, it changes V1. In a non-power valved 2-stroke, I did't think changing the exhaust port (or intake for that matter) had any effect in compression ratio. The same for port distance.
Link Posted: 3/25/2002 12:18:58 PM EDT
After blowing my 2.0 16V (VW) engine using nitrous, I would be scared to ever use the stuff again. It had forged pistons too $$$$. It seems that tuning the engine's fuel/air ratio while on Nitro wrecks havoc on an engine.
Link Posted: 3/25/2002 1:44:30 PM EDT
[url]http://www.magnumforceracing.com/nitrous_oxide_systems_motorcycles.asp#Fogger%20Nitrous%20Systems%20for%20Motorc­ycles%20and%20ATV's[/url] Nuckles. [smash]
Link Posted: 3/25/2002 2:18:00 PM EDT
So what exactly are you going to do with that nitrous? I hope you don't inhale. [;)]
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