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Posted: 3/18/2002 12:18:51 AM EDT
Link Posted: 3/18/2002 12:23:34 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/18/2002 12:24:08 AM EDT by deadeye47]
YUM! You eat good! [:D] The gas is just a bonus!!
Link Posted: 3/18/2002 12:28:52 AM EDT
Can anyone explain how boiling a chunk of meat with cabbage and potatoes for several hours, which would usually be a recipe for disaster, can produce such a fine meal?
Link Posted: 3/18/2002 2:57:55 AM EDT
I love corned beef and cabbage..........anyone have a good recipe they can e-mail me? Thanks......
Link Posted: 3/18/2002 8:22:34 AM EDT
Delicious! (and I love the gas too)
Link Posted: 3/18/2002 8:41:28 AM EDT
Mmmmmmmmm, haven't had corned beef and cabbage (don't forget the potatos (potatoes (canada)) in years.
Link Posted: 3/18/2002 9:50:00 AM EDT
Corned Beef and Cabbage = Gas + Trots
Link Posted: 3/18/2002 10:01:18 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/18/2002 2:01:18 PM EDT by Philadelphia_GunMan]
I'm like 90% Irish and I hate corned beef and cabbage. Maybe I've just never had it done right. However Sheppard's pie I could live off of.
Link Posted: 3/18/2002 10:03:22 AM EDT
Originally Posted By rkb3119: I love corned beef and cabbage..........anyone have a good recipe they can e-mail me? Thanks......
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Yeah, me too. I love the stuff.
Link Posted: 3/18/2002 1:32:35 PM EDT
Originally Posted By operatorerror: Can anyone explain how boiling a chunk of meat with cabbage and potatoes for several hours, which would usually be a recipe for disaster, can produce such a fine meal?
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My family's traditional recipe calls for simmering the corned beef brisket at least 1 hour for each pound it weighs, place it on a cooking tray, spread mustard on it, generously pat it with brown sugar, and bake in the oven at 375 for about another half an hour. Don't forget the soda bread.
Link Posted: 3/18/2002 1:40:03 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Boomer: My family's traditional recipe calls for simmering the corned beef brisket at least 1 hour for each pound it weighs, place it on a cooking tray, spread mustard on it, generously pat it with brown sugar, and bake in the oven at 375 for about another half an hour. Don't forget the soda bread.
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Sounds good! A guy at work does a variant of Boomer's recipe using a root beer glaze. Absolutely fantastic!
Link Posted: 3/18/2002 1:40:12 PM EDT
Hmmmm! Good eating for sure! Ranks right up there with green fried catfish and chili!
Link Posted: 3/18/2002 1:54:19 PM EDT
Corned beef and cabbage is a meal thats hard to beat. I'd eat it every week if I could. You add a good Irish beer to it and I'm in Heaven. CAPITALIST
Link Posted: 3/18/2002 1:59:12 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Big_Bear: I had the traditional corned beef and cabbage for dinner, and here it is six hours later and I still have gas. Had mine, and tonight we are having red flannel hash with the left overs!
Link Posted: 3/18/2002 3:11:23 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Boomer: My family's traditional recipe calls for simmering the corned beef brisket at least 1 hour for each pound it weighs, place it on a cooking tray, spread mustard on it, generously pat it with brown sugar, and bake in the oven at 375 for about another half an hour. Don't forget the soda bread.
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That's the exact same recipe my wife uses, MMM-MMM good! I probably had about a pound of each beef and cabbage as well as a generous helping of potatoes and carrots. We always buy the point cut instead of the more expensive flat cut. We tried the flat cut once and I didn't notice any difference in flavor or tenderness. A couple of days before St. Patty's day you can usually find point cut for about 45-50 cents a poound. Our bedroom looks kind of funny now. You know, with all the paint bubbled on the walls and all. [:D]
Link Posted: 3/18/2002 3:11:46 PM EDT
I heard on the History channel that the traditional meal was Irish Bacon and cabbage. Anybody know what Irish bacon is? I don't think it's pork cause they mostly have sheep.
Link Posted: 3/18/2002 3:13:47 PM EDT
Between the corned beef and cabbage and the Irish Car bombs I drank, I may have invented a new source of power. I'm going to go die now.
Link Posted: 3/18/2002 3:20:35 PM EDT
Link Posted: 3/18/2002 3:25:07 PM EDT
Had some last night. And of course enough for leftovers today. Good eatin for sure!
Link Posted: 3/18/2002 3:28:36 PM EDT
ARRGH! "Ya limp-wristed sissys complaining about gas and the squirt and the such after a fine Irish meal! I oughta knock ya up side your big fat head with me shileighly! Next year eat ya some hagass and quit yer whinin'!" (In my best Cork County Ireland-Irish accent!) My uncle served a 2-year mission in Ireland back in the 70's. The food stories that he told me are just unbelievable! It only confirms what granny tells us every year about Irish food and the such. I love Ireland, corned beef w/ cabbage/taties, & St. Patty's day because of my families roots and all, but let me be clear, I have just three words for you all: God Bless America(and the food that we eat)! [;)]
Link Posted: 3/18/2002 5:02:18 PM EDT
I DESPISE CORNED BEEF AND CABBAGE! Why? Because when I was a kid my dad insisted on making the damned stuff so often that I swear we ate it more than people do in Ireland. Blah!!!!
Link Posted: 3/18/2002 5:29:56 PM EDT
Corned Beef and Cabbage is an American invention, not traditional Irish fare. However, this makes for a good recipe: "Irish Boiled Dinner" Fresh Brisket (is traditional) or corned beef (rinsed of spices). Dredge meat in flour, put in a dutch oven with some hot oil (enough to lightly cover the bottom of the pan). Brown on all sides. Pull the meat out, and brown 1 chopped onion and 3 or 4 minced cloves of garlic. Once they are browned, return the meat and turn the heat down low. Open 4 bottles of Lager style beer (dark beers are too strong for this recipe). Pour 2 over the meat, add enough water (beef stock instead of water gives a better flavor) to cover by about 1". Drink the remaining beer. Add a couple of bay leaves, chopped scallions (about 1/4 cup), 1/4 cup chopped fresh parsley (or dried will work) pepper and salt to taste. Simmer (just under a boil) for 1 to 1 1/2 hour per pound. One Hour before the meat is done, add about 5 or 6 good sized carrots, in 1/2" thick slices, a couple of chunks of turnips (traditional, but I hate the damn things, so I don't use them). Add a bunch of small peeled potatoes, or chunks of larger potatoes. (I personally use canned New potatoes--they aren't traditional, but taste great in this dish--about 3 cans whole new potatoes, drained will work.) Open another bottle of the beer and drink it to cleanse your taste buds for dinner. At 45 minutes to go, take a small head of cabbage, cut it into 1/8ths, and put it in the pot, cover and finish cooking--stirring every 10 minutes or so. Take the last bottle of beer from the six pack, and toast the death of Cabbagehead. Pull the meat out, slice and serve with a good sized plate of the vegi's. Goes good with beer. If you must use a dark beer, I have a recipe for beef braised in Guiness that is quite good. AFARR
Link Posted: 3/20/2002 1:44:52 PM EDT
Originally Posted By AFARR: Corned Beef and Cabbage is an American invention, not traditional Irish fare. However, this makes for a good recipe: "Irish Boiled Dinner" Fresh Brisket (is traditional) or corned beef (rinsed of spices). Dredge meat in flour, put in a dutch oven with some hot oil (enough to lightly cover the bottom of the pan). Brown on all sides. Pull the meat out, and brown 1 chopped onion and 3 or 4 minced cloves of garlic. Once they are browned, return the meat and turn the heat down low. Open 4 bottles of Lager style beer (dark beers are too strong for this recipe). Pour 2 over the meat, add enough water (beef stock instead of water gives a better flavor) to cover by about 1". Drink the remaining beer. Add a couple of bay leaves, chopped scallions (about 1/4 cup), 1/4 cup chopped fresh parsley (or dried will work) pepper and salt to taste. Simmer (just under a boil) for 1 to 1 1/2 hour per pound. One Hour before the meat is done, add about 5 or 6 good sized carrots, in 1/2" thick slices, a couple of chunks of turnips (traditional, but I hate the damn things, so I don't use them). Add a bunch of small peeled potatoes, or chunks of larger potatoes. (I personally use canned New potatoes--they aren't traditional, but taste great in this dish--about 3 cans whole new potatoes, drained will work.) Open another bottle of the beer and drink it to cleanse your taste buds for dinner. At 45 minutes to go, take a small head of cabbage, cut it into 1/8ths, and put it in the pot, cover and finish cooking--stirring every 10 minutes or so. Take the last bottle of beer from the six pack, and toast the death of Cabbagehead. Pull the meat out, slice and serve with a good sized plate of the vegi's. Goes good with beer. If you must use a dark beer, I have a recipe for beef braised in Guiness that is quite good. AFARR
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"You da man!" I will certainly try this, maybe Harps in the boil and Guinness on the side.
Link Posted: 3/20/2002 4:25:16 PM EDT
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